Ghost Hawk

Ghost Hawk

Posted by jack_miller | Published 7 months ago

With 106 ratings

By: Susan Cooper, Jim Dale, et al.

Purchased At: $8

From Newbery Medalist Susan Cooper, a story of adventure and friendship between a young Native American and a colonial New England settler.

On the winter day Little Hawk is sent into the woods alone, he can take only a bow and arrows, his handcrafted tomahawk, and the amazing metal knife his father traded for with the new white settlers. If Little Hawk survives three moons by himself, he will be a man.

John Wakely is only 10 when his father dies, but he has already experienced the warmth and friendship of the nearby tribes. Yet his fellow colonists aren't as accepting of the native people. When he is apprenticed to a barrel-maker, John sees how quickly the relationships between settlers and natives are deteriorating. His friendship with Little Hawk will put both boys in grave danger.

The intertwining stories of Little Hawk and John Wakely are a fascinating tale of friendship and an eye-opening look at the history of our nation. Newbery Medalist Susan Cooper also includes a timeline and an author's note that discusses the historical context of this important and moving novel.

Interesting to read some of the negative reviews as the book is well-conceived from a fictional standpoint. After all, how much history do we have from a Native's perspective from the time period of the pilgrims and Roger Williams?

So not to give anything specific away, this is a story from a 1st American's viewpoint on the first settlers in the Massachusetts area. The author takes liberty with how characters may have responded to one another and it definitely puts the Europeans in a bad light. However, I am almost certain that her insight is as accurate or more than the white accounts we have been spoon-fed for over 300 years. I really appreciate how she wrote the settler's language as well as the Natives curiosity as to what they were saying it sounded authentic.

Overall, I highly recommend this book to 5th grade teachers with higher level readers and it makes for a great read aloud. In fact, it's great for adults who want an easy read and have an open mind to think of this time period in a whole new way.

- anson_ruiz

Ghost Hawk begins with the birth of Little Hawk, a member of the Pokanoket tribe of Massachusetts at the time of the arrival of the first white people. It follows his life until his death by a white man’s bullet at age twelve and then follows the story of John Wakely of about the same age until his death many years later by the bullet of a Native American. Throughout this time John and Little Hawk are friends, first meeting for a few times before Little Hawk’s death, after which John meets and is guided by Little Hawk’s spirit. It is powerful fiction in a historical setting. The story captures the conflict between the Native Americans who understand themselves as of the land and the Europeans who understand land as something you buy and sell. Sadly by the end of the story, the Native Americans find they must succumb to selling the land to continue to exist. This is also the sad tale on both sides of what happens when culture are more committed to building stronger walls rather than greater trust.

- caylee_morgan

I thoroughly enjoyed the realistic storyline describing early Colonial relationships and developing conflicts with the native Americans. It is easy to understand why interactions became difficult and misunderstood due to language, religion, and political agendas. Not so realistic perhaps was the longterm interracial relationship between the narrator, a native who was unfairly killed by a European settler, but lived on as a ghost, and his white colonial friend. Still it worked and I recommend this book for those interested in early American history.

- bentley_johnson

Only in the mind of the brilliant Susan Cooper could a story like this be steeped properly to be served up to the reader in such a magnificent way. Taking us back into the time in American history that has become more legendary than factual, Ms. Cooper crafts a tale of time and place with action that is expertly whispered into our consciousness with beauty, respect and the possibility of the sad truth of the time. Ghost Hawk honors the mythic traditions of the First People and invites us to witness this time in a way that compels the reader to question what they thought they knew; possibly opening the mind's door just enough to find time to venture out further into artifacts that might contain more stories from those times. A masterful novel for all ages.

- brenna_sanders

Not one of her best books, but it's still okay. The Dark is Rising series is her BEST WORK.

- londyn_alvarez

The story is close to home for me, as most of it takes place in Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts. I love learning about Native American ways, and the author does a great job of it.

- aleah_davis

Good little book. I enjoyed the reading. It is also a good bridge for teaching a American Indians unit

- eloise_hughes

This is a wonderful peek into the lives of Indian tribes who coped with the white settlers on the east coast. It gives the perspective of the Indian, and truly they were to be pitied.

- joseph_jackson

Beautifully written, evocative and at times almost unbearably moving. This book is a rewarding read for both middle grade, YA and adults. I loved it. The story of Little Hawk's experience of the English settlers, some with bigoted interpretations of their own religion, and their interactions with the indigenous native people is an ongoing parable of the past and present. Susan Cooper brilliantly shines a light on a troubled period of history through the eyes of her believable, sympathetic and convincing characters, both English and Native. Uplifting in parts, troubling in others. She leaves us with many questions. I walked around thinking about this book for days after I finished reading it. Another classic by this immensely talented and sensitive author.

- malachi_evans

bought this book for my son (10 yrs) and he loved it so
much he didn't want to stop (even to go skiing and he loves that).

the vocabulary isn't that difficult, but it is good to teach your kids the history of New England without them realising it.

it's quite sad that someone gets killed for no reason at all, but in the end it is satisfying and soothing.

recomended age: 11yrs

- ellis_torres

This story is superb. It has parallel lives within it, with a faux finale and final triumph. Much research has been done by Cooper to ensure that historical accuracy has been achieved. Identification with those events enables the reader to follow events further in more detail. This story would be a fantastic individual, family and group read. It is difficult to say much more, without giving too much away, but this was a massive competitor for being favorite within our group this year.

- estelle_price

Really enjoyed this one! As a secondary school teacher I try to read a lot of the Carnegie nominees. Ghost Hawk reminded me of a lot of my own childhood favourites (especially The Hollow Tree by Janet Lunn) and I really appreciated Cooper's daring narrative choices. Very interesting, and a good introductory perspective for British kids into what life was like in colonial America.

- messiah_ross

Interesting to read some of the negative reviews as the book is well-conceived from a fictional standpoint. After all, how much history do we have from a Native's perspective from the time period of the pilgrims and Roger Williams?

So not to give anything specific away, this is a story from a 1st American's viewpoint on the first settlers in the Massachusetts area. The author takes liberty with how characters may have responded to one another and it definitely puts the Europeans in a bad light. However, I am almost certain that her insight is as accurate or more than the white accounts we have been spoon-fed for over 300 years. I really appreciate how she wrote the settler's language as well as the Natives curiosity as to what they were saying it sounded authentic.

Overall, I highly recommend this book to 5th grade teachers with higher level readers and it makes for a great read aloud. In fact, it's great for adults who want an easy read and have an open mind to think of this time period in a whole new way.

- orlando_evans

Ghost Hawk begins with the birth of Little Hawk, a member of the Pokanoket tribe of Massachusetts at the time of the arrival of the first white people. It follows his life until his death by a white man’s bullet at age twelve and then follows the story of John Wakely of about the same age until his death many years later by the bullet of a Native American. Throughout this time John and Little Hawk are friends, first meeting for a few times before Little Hawk’s death, after which John meets and is guided by Little Hawk’s spirit. It is powerful fiction in a historical setting. The story captures the conflict between the Native Americans who understand themselves as of the land and the Europeans who understand land as something you buy and sell. Sadly by the end of the story, the Native Americans find they must succumb to selling the land to continue to exist. This is also the sad tale on both sides of what happens when culture are more committed to building stronger walls rather than greater trust.

- emma_smith

I thoroughly enjoyed the realistic storyline describing early Colonial relationships and developing conflicts with the native Americans. It is easy to understand why interactions became difficult and misunderstood due to language, religion, and political agendas. Not so realistic perhaps was the longterm interracial relationship between the narrator, a native who was unfairly killed by a European settler, but lived on as a ghost, and his white colonial friend. Still it worked and I recommend this book for those interested in early American history.

- martin_watson

Only in the mind of the brilliant Susan Cooper could a story like this be steeped properly to be served up to the reader in such a magnificent way. Taking us back into the time in American history that has become more legendary than factual, Ms. Cooper crafts a tale of time and place with action that is expertly whispered into our consciousness with beauty, respect and the possibility of the sad truth of the time. Ghost Hawk honors the mythic traditions of the First People and invites us to witness this time in a way that compels the reader to question what they thought they knew; possibly opening the mind's door just enough to find time to venture out further into artifacts that might contain more stories from those times. A masterful novel for all ages.

- reed_watson

Not one of her best books, but it's still okay. The Dark is Rising series is her BEST WORK.

- lexie_brooks

The story is close to home for me, as most of it takes place in Rhode Island and southeastern Massachusetts. I love learning about Native American ways, and the author does a great job of it.

- kelsey_foster

Good little book. I enjoyed the reading. It is also a good bridge for teaching a American Indians unit

- cooper_mendoza

This is a wonderful peek into the lives of Indian tribes who coped with the white settlers on the east coast. It gives the perspective of the Indian, and truly they were to be pitied.

- stevie_foster

Beautifully written, evocative and at times almost unbearably moving. This book is a rewarding read for both middle grade, YA and adults. I loved it. The story of Little Hawk's experience of the English settlers, some with bigoted interpretations of their own religion, and their interactions with the indigenous native people is an ongoing parable of the past and present. Susan Cooper brilliantly shines a light on a troubled period of history through the eyes of her believable, sympathetic and convincing characters, both English and Native. Uplifting in parts, troubling in others. She leaves us with many questions. I walked around thinking about this book for days after I finished reading it. Another classic by this immensely talented and sensitive author.

- vienna_foster

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