Pushing Daisies: Season 1 [Blu-ray]

Pushing Daisies: Season 1 [Blu-ray]

Posted by jack_miller | Published 7 months ago

With ratings

Purchased At: $2.24 (40 used & new offers)

I took a chance on this show because its soundtrack includes one of my favorite songs, Birdhouse in Your Soul, sung by Ellen Greene and the incomparable Kristin Chenoweth, and because of its outstanding ratings... so many people love it! Now having watched the first season, I TOTALLY understand why! The premise is so creative, and it's presented in a quirky, charming, engaging, and delightful way. It's a dark comedy, but there's also a distinct lightness to it which is so engaging.

When I first watched it, it honestly reminded me of My Name is Earl, another show I LOVED, even though the two are wildly different from each other in tone and content. I think it reminded me of Earl because it is so utterly unique and unlike (almost) anything I'd ever seen before, and because of its rapid-fire, witty dialogue, its saturated color/aesthetic, and its wonderful music- although Pushing Daisies' music is decidedly more orchestral than Earl's. It's also very much like Monk in that each episode focuses on figuring out how and why someone has died as only it's unique protagonist can do- in this case, Ned asks the deceased people themselves and, with the help of Chuck and Emerson, builds on the clues they provide. Perhaps best of all, it truly feels like watching a Dr. Seuss movie with its lush colors- especially orange and green, its narrator, and its candy coating of whimsy. What other show can be described as talking to the dead with a candy coating of whimsy? None. If this sounds wonderful or even just intriguing to you, I highly recommend watching! It's an excellent show!

- eli_turner

I am a retired Hollywood sound editor—I did M*A*S*H for 6 years—so I know quality television. PUSHING DAISIES blew me away from from the first 12 minutes. It was feature-film quality all the way around. Those first 12 minutes set the tone for the whole show—superb cast, excellent script, laugh-out-loud funny, pathos, cinematography, art direction, editing, visual effects, even stop-frame animation! As I kept watching I was thinking, “there’s no way they can keep this quality going on a weekly basis”—but they did. The clever (and at time tongue-twisting) dialogue. The sets—the carpets match the drapes—AND the bedspreads!—and the Technicolor brilliance of the color!—the almost non-stop music which adds enormously to the charm, and of course the beautiful chaste romance in the middle of a very black comedy! There are so many excellent details that are only revealed on repeated viewings—why are there bees? Why are there circles everywhere? Why are the double names—The Darling Mermaid Darlings, Charles Charles, Travel Boutique Boutique Travel? The odd mix of cars, from a Toyota Prius to a 1940’s sedan on the same street? A key character “who is the only detective named after a poet and a fish.” And I love the coroner.....who seldom says more than “Hmmmmmmmm.....” There are so many delights in this show that you can watch it over and over and over.

Plus, speaking as a filmmaker/editor, it’s the ONLY TIME I’ve EVER seen a key plot point and a key joke being a CAMERA MOVEMENT! I just about fell out of my chair on that one!

Everything about this show is truly top drawer, and it was like getting to watch a screwball comedy each week with delightfully odd characters in a universe that, as one reviewer said, “is a Technicolor world at right angles to our own.”

- david_thompson

This is by far my favorite show that I have ever seen. The main storyline about the lives of Ned, Chuck, Olive, and Emerson is original and intelligent, and it balances the humorous and the sympathetic very well. The characters are loveable, funny, and adorably imperfect, and they are brilliantly acted by some superb actors. The chemistry (romantic or otherwise) between Ned and the other main characters is spot on to me. Additionally, the episodic storylines of various death investigations are ingenious and hilarious. The situations border on the absurd but in the best way possible as part of the over-the-top, fairy-tale presentation of the show. Visually, the show is interesting and often unexpected.

The show deserved every one of the seven Emmy Awards it got (in addition to the other awards), and the ratings and cancellation seem to be more a reflection of the American public's desire for unoriginal, clichéd, unintelligent crime dramas and hospital dramas and celebrity dance-offs than a reflection on the brilliance of Pushing Daisies.

- mario_miller

Where do I start with this underrated and wonderfully written show? It's clearly a show that was ahead of its time and the writing was superb, to say in the very least. Unfortunately it was aired at the wrong time and cancelled mainly due to the writers strike that occurred during the same time as the 2nd season came around. I'm guessing that the reason it didn't come back like other shows was probably, at least in my own opinion) that this show was too intelligent for the mainstream reality/cliche' situation comedy/competition/talk show/game show viewer's IQ. Seriously, how does the junk like Two and a Half Men stay on the air when this was so much better and extraordinary in its genre?
I could go on and on, but what's the point? The only thing that I have left to say is that if you are going to buy the box sets make sure you get them on Blu-Ray. The picture is phenomenal and well worth it even though they don't come with any extras.

- griffin_nelson

Delightfully creepy situation comedy. A young man named Ned (Lee Pace) owns a pie restaurant. But pie-making is not all he can do. He has the power to bring the dead back to life, with a touch. Unfortunately, if the revived one stays alive for longer than a minute, someone else dies, in place of the one who should be dead. So, what do you do with a talent like that?

The love of his life is Chuck (Anna Friel). They would love to draw closer together, but dare not, for she was drowned. By rights, she should still be dead. Ned revived her with a touch from his magic finger. Unfortunately, if he were to touch her again, she would return to being dead. Permanently, this time!

If that weren’t complicated enough, Olive Snook, the blonde young lady who helps out in the pie restaurant(Kristin Chenoweth) is in love with him.

Ned and Chuck get together with private investigator Emerson Cod (Chi McBride). They do good business solving murders. Ned revives the deceased for one minute, and they ask who the murderer is. Simple!

The series is done in a deliberately stylized manner, with a delightful voice-over by Jim Dale.

- opal_collins

Fantastic series and very difficult to find copies of the dvds anywhere, I bought both season 1 and 2 on different days but the seller sent both together, so it was a wonderful surprise to open the package and find not one but two dvds. Would definitely recommend both the seller and the series.

Unfortunately disc 1 did have a few issues with skipping but it only happened once per episode and I didn't miss an awful lot, so it wasn't too much of a problem.

- hunter_evans

Master piemaker Ned has a secret. He can bring people back to life. Any further physical contact from him, though, means dead for ever. More than a minute of life unfortunately means sudden death for somebody close by. This suits him fine, only a minute needed to learn the identity of their killers. His mate private detective Emerson can then catch the villains and claim the reward.

Ned needs to be extra careful when with his dog Digby and childhood sweetheart Chuck, both living anew because of him....

Lee Page and Anna Friel shine as the untouchables, real romance impossible for obvious reasons. A lively cast does full justice to OTT roles - especially the two aunts (ex-synchronized swimmers) and Ned's adoring waitress Olive (distraught on learning their saliva is incompatible).

Jim Dale narrates. Witty scripts. Vivid colours. Lush music. Many surprises and lots of laughs, including that hilarious brief allusion to Hitchcock's "The Birds". (Just one regret, apart from only nine episodes and no bonuses. Surely Ned could have found a better name for his diner!)

A fairy tale for adults, "Edward Scissorhands"-style? A bitter-sweet love story? Call it what you will. Simply salute a series that jumps on no bandwagon, preferring to offer something entertainingly and refreshingly different.

Great fun.

- guadalupe_white

It's as if early Tim Burton had written a TV series. Beautiful scenery, vivid colours, a story that's difficult to describe (it really is) and a premature end. I accidentally caught this on TV in the early noughties, thought it was brilliant and watched it until it simply disappeared. The writing has a lightness and with we rarely see in more heavy handed telegraphing series. Brilliantly cast, well played and directed. The verbal wit and balance of the macabre and comedy make it one of the series I wish had gone on.

- ayla_young

I took a chance on this show because its soundtrack includes one of my favorite songs, Birdhouse in Your Soul, sung by Ellen Greene and the incomparable Kristin Chenoweth, and because of its outstanding ratings... so many people love it! Now having watched the first season, I TOTALLY understand why! The premise is so creative, and it's presented in a quirky, charming, engaging, and delightful way. It's a dark comedy, but there's also a distinct lightness to it which is so engaging.

When I first watched it, it honestly reminded me of My Name is Earl, another show I LOVED, even though the two are wildly different from each other in tone and content. I think it reminded me of Earl because it is so utterly unique and unlike (almost) anything I'd ever seen before, and because of its rapid-fire, witty dialogue, its saturated color/aesthetic, and its wonderful music- although Pushing Daisies' music is decidedly more orchestral than Earl's. It's also very much like Monk in that each episode focuses on figuring out how and why someone has died as only it's unique protagonist can do- in this case, Ned asks the deceased people themselves and, with the help of Chuck and Emerson, builds on the clues they provide. Perhaps best of all, it truly feels like watching a Dr. Seuss movie with its lush colors- especially orange and green, its narrator, and its candy coating of whimsy. What other show can be described as talking to the dead with a candy coating of whimsy? None. If this sounds wonderful or even just intriguing to you, I highly recommend watching! It's an excellent show!

- marley_rodriguez

I am a retired Hollywood sound editor—I did M*A*S*H for 6 years—so I know quality television. PUSHING DAISIES blew me away from from the first 12 minutes. It was feature-film quality all the way around. Those first 12 minutes set the tone for the whole show—superb cast, excellent script, laugh-out-loud funny, pathos, cinematography, art direction, editing, visual effects, even stop-frame animation! As I kept watching I was thinking, “there’s no way they can keep this quality going on a weekly basis”—but they did. The clever (and at time tongue-twisting) dialogue. The sets—the carpets match the drapes—AND the bedspreads!—and the Technicolor brilliance of the color!—the almost non-stop music which adds enormously to the charm, and of course the beautiful chaste romance in the middle of a very black comedy! There are so many excellent details that are only revealed on repeated viewings—why are there bees? Why are there circles everywhere? Why are the double names—The Darling Mermaid Darlings, Charles Charles, Travel Boutique Boutique Travel? The odd mix of cars, from a Toyota Prius to a 1940’s sedan on the same street? A key character “who is the only detective named after a poet and a fish.” And I love the coroner.....who seldom says more than “Hmmmmmmmm.....” There are so many delights in this show that you can watch it over and over and over.

Plus, speaking as a filmmaker/editor, it’s the ONLY TIME I’ve EVER seen a key plot point and a key joke being a CAMERA MOVEMENT! I just about fell out of my chair on that one!

Everything about this show is truly top drawer, and it was like getting to watch a screwball comedy each week with delightfully odd characters in a universe that, as one reviewer said, “is a Technicolor world at right angles to our own.”

- castiel_patel

This is by far my favorite show that I have ever seen. The main storyline about the lives of Ned, Chuck, Olive, and Emerson is original and intelligent, and it balances the humorous and the sympathetic very well. The characters are loveable, funny, and adorably imperfect, and they are brilliantly acted by some superb actors. The chemistry (romantic or otherwise) between Ned and the other main characters is spot on to me. Additionally, the episodic storylines of various death investigations are ingenious and hilarious. The situations border on the absurd but in the best way possible as part of the over-the-top, fairy-tale presentation of the show. Visually, the show is interesting and often unexpected.

The show deserved every one of the seven Emmy Awards it got (in addition to the other awards), and the ratings and cancellation seem to be more a reflection of the American public's desire for unoriginal, clichéd, unintelligent crime dramas and hospital dramas and celebrity dance-offs than a reflection on the brilliance of Pushing Daisies.

- karlie_gomez

Where do I start with this underrated and wonderfully written show? It's clearly a show that was ahead of its time and the writing was superb, to say in the very least. Unfortunately it was aired at the wrong time and cancelled mainly due to the writers strike that occurred during the same time as the 2nd season came around. I'm guessing that the reason it didn't come back like other shows was probably, at least in my own opinion) that this show was too intelligent for the mainstream reality/cliche' situation comedy/competition/talk show/game show viewer's IQ. Seriously, how does the junk like Two and a Half Men stay on the air when this was so much better and extraordinary in its genre?
I could go on and on, but what's the point? The only thing that I have left to say is that if you are going to buy the box sets make sure you get them on Blu-Ray. The picture is phenomenal and well worth it even though they don't come with any extras.

- griffin_nelson

Delightfully creepy situation comedy. A young man named Ned (Lee Pace) owns a pie restaurant. But pie-making is not all he can do. He has the power to bring the dead back to life, with a touch. Unfortunately, if the revived one stays alive for longer than a minute, someone else dies, in place of the one who should be dead. So, what do you do with a talent like that?

The love of his life is Chuck (Anna Friel). They would love to draw closer together, but dare not, for she was drowned. By rights, she should still be dead. Ned revived her with a touch from his magic finger. Unfortunately, if he were to touch her again, she would return to being dead. Permanently, this time!

If that weren’t complicated enough, Olive Snook, the blonde young lady who helps out in the pie restaurant(Kristin Chenoweth) is in love with him.

Ned and Chuck get together with private investigator Emerson Cod (Chi McBride). They do good business solving murders. Ned revives the deceased for one minute, and they ask who the murderer is. Simple!

The series is done in a deliberately stylized manner, with a delightful voice-over by Jim Dale.

- bentley_johnson

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