Cameron Reyes

Joined 2 years ago

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Rich by Habit: Learn the Success Habits of the Rich with Proven Ways to Change Bad Habits, Create Rich Habits, and Change Your Life (Habits of Successful People)
Rich by Habit: Learn the Success Habits of the Rich with Proven Ways to Change Bad Habits, Create Rich Habits, and Change Your Life (Habits of Successful People)
“Motivation is what get you started. Habit is what keeps you going.”
This is an amazing book which could help people in many ways. Basing it from the title, the main aim of this book is to help us be as successful financially like Mark Zuckerberg and Steve Jobs, but I know this book can help change one's life not only financially but also in a lot of different aspects. Rich by Habit discussed how we can change all the bad habits dragging us down and start making the good habits which will allow us to achieve whatever goals we set, losing weight could be one. I definitely have learned a lot from this book, not only did it gave me knowledge, but it also gave me motivation to let go of the bad habits, known and unknown (before I read this book and realized it was a habit dragging me down), and start changing my life now. Great and helpful book!
Jeff Bezos: La Fuerza Detrás de la Marca: Introspección y Análisis de la Vida y Logros del Hombre más Rico del Planeta: Visionarios Billonarios, Volume 1 [Visionary Billionaires, Book 1]
Jeff Bezos: La Fuerza Detrás de la Marca: Introspección y Análisis de la Vida y Logros del Hombre más Rico del Planeta: Visionarios Billonarios, Volume 1 [Visionary Billionaires, Book 1]
Me ha gustado del libro en la forma en que el autor lleva la historia. Aportando de su conocimiento e inspiración en cada tema. Expresa de forma clara las diferentes formas y marcos mentales que tuvo Jeff y nos ayuda a nosotros a situarnos y ver donde estamos ahora. Para así movernos al próximo nivel en nuestras vidas. Recomiendo para todo aquel emprendedor que no desee ser promedio.
Natty Dread
Natty Dread
This was an album of great transition for Bob, he had split with his childhood friends and original Wailers, Peter Tosh and Bunny Wailer. Bob's influence over the band was becoming more and more pronounced and Tosh and Wailer decided that is not the direction they wished to go. The revamped band was now, for the first time, known as "Bob Marley and The Wailers" as opposed to just "The Wailers" thus solidifying Marley as the primary leader of the band.

Bob truly took charge of the overall focus and direction of the group and wrote all the songs. In an interesting twist of fate and one of the best business moves in music history, he assigned the credits for many of his songs to his close family memebers and friends as a way to make sure they were taken care of financial, certain charities he believed in and supported were funded and as a way to avoid contractual obligations to his former publishing company, Cayman Music.

Although this is a transition album of sorts, it sports some of his most memorable songs and one in particular that would be one of his defining moments, "No Woman, No Cry" which would gain much fame due to his incredible live performances of the record. He would introduce the "I-Threes" a female vocal group that included his wife, Rita Marley, Marcia Griffiths and Judy Mowatt. Their vocals addeded a wonderful compliment to Bob's on songs such as one of my personal favorites on the album, "Them Belly Full (But We Hungry)". The writing on this album seems very personal and almost takes you on a journey through Bob's life in Jamaica and some of the obstacles he had to overcome.

This record is also a canvas for Bob to infuse some of his Rastafarian beliefs and he does a marvelous job of this on songs such as "So Jah Seh" and the title track "Natty Dread". This album is almost like Bob saying "Here I Am, The Real Me" and he gives us a fairly detailed revelation of where his heart was and where his and the bands focus was now going to be. I believe this to be one of his most profound works and it's one of my personal favorites. It's only years after it's release and in particular after his death that I think many truly appreciated this album for it's greatness.

There are many wonderful songs beyond "No Woman, No Cry" that make this a truly wonderful album and it gives it's listener a front row seat into some of the many tragic situations going on in his homeland and, indeed, many of the places dear to his heart such as the other island nations, Africa and United States. Bob Marley was a revolutionary in every since of the word and he would spend the remainder of his tragically short life fighting for the cause, "Revolution".
No Direction Home: The Soundtrack (The Bootleg Series Vol. 7)
No Direction Home: The Soundtrack (The Bootleg Series Vol. 7)
After a long career which has famously been `Bootlegged' many times, Bob Dylan has now decided to do what the fans have wanted all along and started to release previously archived material - unreleased demos, live recordings, stuff that never made it onto albums etc - in a series of official Bootleg albums. The first three volumes were a good mixture of alternative versions and live numbers that never made it to albums and included many important and interesting recordings, such as the original Blood on the Tracks sessions. The fourth volume was the infamous Manchester concert from 1966, recorded at a time when Dylan was accused of being a traitor to the folk movement for his electric album Highway 61. So far so good, these were recordings well worth owning, especially the visceral '66 concert. But for volumes 5 and 6 somewhat uninteresting live recordings were released, that led me to feel as though material was now being released for the sake of it and to cash in on avid fans (such as myself) who will buy anything released by his Bobness.

This seventh volume in the series addresses these issues, and presents us with another 2 discs of important material that really adds to your Dylan collection. Chronologically it covers the period from 1959 and a rather muddy recording which doesn't sound much, but was in fact the first recording made by the legend. It then follows his career for 7 years up to Highway 61 Revisited. The transformation in his style and ability in the time is astonishing. It tells the story of his progression through a series of previously unreleased recordings - demos, alternative versions, songs cut from albums and live recordings. An interesting way of doing things, and much better for the avid Dylanologist that charting his progress through the usual best of route. The material here is genuinely new, interesting and worthwhile. Especially cuts of songs that were dropped from albums before release, some of these are so good that you wonder why they were dropped. It's a real testament to Dylan's genius, and a very essential purchase for any Dylan fan.
Bob Dylan for Clawhammer Banjo
Bob Dylan for Clawhammer Banjo
This is a book full of excellently done tabs for Bob Dylan in clawhammer banjo. The way the songs are tabbed out don't make it seem like the songs were "forced" into the necessary pattern for clawhammer style, they're all in standard tunings (G, D, Double C, and all along the watchtower is in D minor), and different rhythms that are great fun and fit inductively to the natural "bum ditty" groove of clawhammer. Rather, the tabs make it seem like the songs were meant to be played this way. Most tunes are easy enough for the intermediate player to work through, and to entertain fully the advanced player. Playing claw hammer banjo can get a little repetitive when all you're playing are folk tunes that all sound quite similar, and I found this book to be a great change of pace while staying true to the clawhammer style. I can't recommend this book enough for anybody who likes to play clawhammer banjo.
Bob Dylan
Bob Dylan
I don't know why I bought this particular CD (Hallmark, for Heaven's sake!) instead of the CD on the Columbia label. Hallmark seems especially antithetical to Dylan's early works. Never mind...this is a wonderful and historically important album. I bought the record back in the '60s after first buying and getting hooked on "Another Side of Bob Dylan." The songs on that album were written mostly by Dylan, whereas only about half of the tracks on his first release were penned by him. the CD notes credit the traditional song "House of the Risin' Sun" to the blues singer Dave von Ronk, whose version I still think is the best one ever recorded. However, von Ronk did not write the song and no one knows who did.

The actual Highway 51 is familiar to most Midwesterners from Wisconsin and Illinois. Back in '63, I found it to be the quickest drive from Little Rock to Kenosha, though speed traps along the way were a challenge (and expensive). But never mind the songs' subjects; Dylan's style was a radical departure from anything the folk singers of the time were writing and singing. Although Donovan's first album, "What's Bin Did and What's Bin Hid" (featuring his first hit "Catch the Wind"), was compared favorably to Dylan's work, the resemblance is difficult to hear (perhaps it was just the fact that he, too, played guitar and harmonica). In any case, I loved that album and learned to play a few songs on it. To my ears, Mark Knopfler's sound on Dire Straits' first album compared most favorably with Bob Dylan. It fooled me the first time I heard his voice. I thought, "Is this Dylan?" The voice was a little different, but Dylan's voice has changed many times over the years.

In the songs on this album that were written by Dylan, we get to hear the formative period of all that came later, at least up until 1966 and "Blonde on Blonde" and even "John Wesley Harding" (1967), which brought us "All Along the Watchtower" and "The Wicked Messenger"). Though there is a certain continuity from this first album through all that followed, it can be difficult to hear without listening to them all in chronological order. However, it's neigh impossible to see how Dylan's recent albums of 2015 to '17 (as well as "Christmas in the Heart") have anything to do with any of his earlier output. These, for whatever they are worth, seem more of a self-indulgence, though I like to listen to his Christmas album during the holiday season.

Anyone who loves Bob Dylan's body of work should become familiar with this album. It represents the seed from which it all grew.
Playlist: The Very Best Of Bob Dylan
Playlist: The Very Best Of Bob Dylan
I must confess I bought this cd for the song , Make you feel my love , perhaps perfected in voice by Garth Brooks but nonetheless written by the genius of Dylan . I read some review that said this song had weak lyrics .....you could have fooled me I think its romantic genius but on to the cd content . Any self respecting child of the 50,s and 60's probably has some fond memories and recordings of those early Dylan inevitable masterpieces like Blowin in the wind or Like a rolling stone but this playlist does the unexpected , it brings us full circle from those humble folk beginnings that made him our musical prophet to the very roots of it, blues and soul .....You'll have to decide if all the songs in between are the very best of....
Legendary Broadcasts: 1969-1984 by Bob Dylan
Legendary Broadcasts: 1969-1984 by Bob Dylan
A collection of five live TV performances. Of the five shows, three are important for any Dylan fan: "The World of John Hammond Show" in '75 features the performance debut of "Hurricane" and it does not disappoint. The Saturday Night Live show in '79 debuts three songs from his gospel album "Slow Train Coming." (Kind of humorous to hear Dylan forget some of the words of "Gotta Serve Somebody" and instead repeat the lines about "You may be rich or poor..." for a second time.) The third show is the one that is indispensable--the '84 Letterman Show. Three songs with a three piece Latino punk band named The Plugz. Incredible energy--this version of "Jokerman" is priceless. This was the only performance of Bob and the Plugz. It is rough, sloppy--and utterly magnificent. According to the band members, there was some talk of Bob and the Plugz doing some more work together, but it never came to fruition. 'Tis a pity--it boggles the mind to consider what might have been during Dylan's mid '80's fallow period had he done more work with this band. Sound quality is quite acceptable for a non-official release. If it becomes available again, snap it up!
Piña Colada Scent Professional Air Freshener Pads - Remove The Worst Smells with These Heavy Duty Pads (60 Pads Per Pack) (Piña Colada Scent)
Piña Colada Scent Professional Air Freshener Pads - Remove The Worst Smells with These Heavy Duty Pads (60 Pads Per Pack) (Piña Colada Scent)
I felt I needed to write my experience with this product to give customers more information to make a decision. I was excited I had found a cinnamon scented auto air freshener that some people gave good reviews. I could not give this a good review. I opened the package and took one out and it smelled somewhat strong. I put in my car with windows up and used the car later on. I could not even smell any cinnamon at all. I only smelled the bad smell I was trying to get rid of. I would not recommend this product at all, it is total waste of money and time. I am returning this item in search of a product that really works.

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