Cecilia Ortiz

Joined 10 months ago

Cecilia's Favorites
Head First Python: A Brain-Friendly Guide
Head First Python: A Brain-Friendly Guide
Head First Python: A Brain-Friendly Guide by Paul Barry. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 172 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
KISS Javascript: read, type and run
KISS Javascript: read, type and run
KISS Javascript: read, type and run by Fabio Quintilii Leoni. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Functional Architecture with React and Redux
Functional Architecture with React and Redux
Functional Architecture with React and Redux by Cristian Salcescu. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce, Jim Killavey, et al.. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 665 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
The Last Alchemist
The Last Alchemist
The Last Alchemist by Erik Hamre. Rated 4.2 out of 5 stars, with 644 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
Harry Potter i wiezien Azkabanu
Harry Potter i wiezien Azkabanu
Harry Potter i wiezien Azkabanu by J.K. Rowling. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 5 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
The Partner: A Novel
The Partner: A Novel
The Partner: A Novel by John Grisham, Frank Muller, et al.. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 1866 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Java Programming, Loose-Leaf Version
Java Programming, Loose-Leaf Version
Java Programming, Loose-Leaf Version by Joyce Farrell. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Java Programming(Chinese Edition)
Java Programming(Chinese Edition)
Java Programming(Chinese Edition) by WANG WEN ZHOU SU. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Java for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series)
Java for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series)
Java for Programmers (Deitel Developer Series) by Paul J. Deitel and Harvey M. Deitel. Rated 3.6 out of 5 stars, with 9 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Dive Into Python
Dive Into Python
Dive Into Python by Mark Pilgrim. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 53 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Python programming' category.
PHP Programming Solutions
PHP Programming Solutions
PHP Programming Solutions by Vikram Vaswani. Rated 2.3 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Pro Oracle SQL (Expert's Voice in Oracle)
Pro Oracle SQL (Expert's Voice in Oracle)
Pro Oracle SQL (Expert's Voice in Oracle) by Karen Morton. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 11 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills
Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills
Multisensory Teaching of Basic Language Skills by Judith R. Birsh, Suzanne Carreker, et al.. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 15 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the R programming category.
A Julia Developer's Notebook: 150 Dotted Grid Pages customized for Julia Programmers and Developers with individually Numbered Pages. Notebook with ... format: 6 x 9 in (A Dev NB Blue and Orange)
A Julia Developer's Notebook: 150 Dotted Grid Pages customized for Julia Programmers and Developers with individually Numbered Pages. Notebook with ... format: 6 x 9 in (A Dev NB Blue and Orange)
A Julia Developer's Notebook: 150 Dotted Grid Pages customized for Julia Programmers and Developers with individually Numbered Pages. Notebook with ... format: 6 x 9 in (A Dev NB Blue and Orange) by 2 SCRIBBLE. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Julia programming category.
Bash in easy steps
Bash in easy steps
Bash in easy steps by Mike McGrath. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 2 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Shell programming category.
Design pattern in Typescript: come ragionare per creare il design ottimo a partire dai requisiti di progetti reali: Il processo per creare un design semplice ... + 2 progetti reali (Italian Edition)
Design pattern in Typescript: come ragionare per creare il design ottimo a partire dai requisiti di progetti reali: Il processo per creare un design semplice ... + 2 progetti reali (Italian Edition)
premessa: come anche l'autore consiglia, bisogna avere un minimo di familiarità con i concetti dell'OOP e della nomenclatura di programmazione . Detto questo l'autore riesce con un linguaggio scorrevole e comprensibile ai più ad esprimere concetti che normalmente richiedono studi complessi mediante l'uso di esempi e riferimenti.
Raggiunge secondo me l'obiettivo in toto ed è da considerarsi secondo me un valido supporto per gli sviluppatori facendo luce sui design pattern ormai indispensabili ai colloqui e anche per migliorare il design del software.
Complimenti.
How to Stop Living Paycheck to Paycheck (2nd Edition): A proven path to money mastery in only 15 minutes a week! (Simple Personal Finance Books) (Smart Money Blueprint)
How to Stop Living Paycheck to Paycheck (2nd Edition): A proven path to money mastery in only 15 minutes a week! (Simple Personal Finance Books) (Smart Money Blueprint)
I would imagine this is a great book for certain kinds of people. The problem is that the information and the tips in this book are geared towards the lowest common denominator. If you have no or next to no previous financial education then this is probably an excellent book for you to start with. If you already understand the basics of budgeting, and what a budget is, then it might not be worth your while to read through this entire book.
There are a few small things I got out of the book, here and there. But ultimately I could tell that I wasn’t the target demographic for this book. I also didn’t like the last chapter where the author kind of broached the idea of “money scripts” but then didn’t mention what a money script was or how it impacts one’s ability to budget and save money. It either shouldn’t have been included or should have been written differently.
If the idea of budgeting is foreign to you, if you’ve never tried it before, if you’ve never taken any accounting or finance classes, this book will probably help you elevate your game a thousand. But if you’ve had even an elementary financial background and are having problems budgeting for reasons other than you go to happy hour every day, then you’ll probably be better off with another book.
This book spends a lot of time essentially saying “be honest and transparent with yourself about where you spend your money and why you do it. Then plan to do better.” It’s a worthwhile message for everyone, but this book isn’t just for anyone.
Gravitas: Communicate with Confidence, Influence and Authority
Gravitas: Communicate with Confidence, Influence and Authority
I picked this book up in Waterstones one afternoon. It grabbed my attention because improving gravitas sounded pretty appealing, especially as i had to prepare for a best man speech and some work related public speaking. I'm not low on confidence by any means but i wanted to optimise the way i carry myself generally and public speaking has always been a weak point. I had some horrible moments at school and uni when i just completely choked. i tend to ramble, mumble and read from a sheet.
This book get's straight to the point, teaching you exercises to improve your confidence and gravitas immediately, gradually building up to a level where i personally felt confident to deliver the speech. Learning the psychology helped me with my nerves because it made me more aware of what was going wrong, why it was going wrong and how to rectify it. I like the quotes from famous public speakers and you soon begin to understand that gravitas is something that can learned, like those speakers themselves have been taught.
This book is very well written because i get bored easily and it kept me engaged. Every time i read a chapter i learned something new. Another thing i like about the book is that it's not just preparing you for a speech, it's arming you with the life skills to communicate with people more effectively and leave a lasting impression. I can honestly say, have changed my mindset and given me greater impetus. If you read one book this year, Gravitas would be my personal recommendation.
Mind Mapping: Improve Memory, Concentration, Communication, Organization, Creativity, and Time Management
Mind Mapping: Improve Memory, Concentration, Communication, Organization, Creativity, and Time Management
`Mind Maps' offers exactly what it promises - it helps you to improve various parts of your brain functioning, for example, memory, concentration, organization and more. As someone that is self-employed, I want to be as efficient and effective in my work as possible, which is why I bought this book.

The book really does start from the beginning, so even if you're a complete beginner and have never tried mind mapping before, you can still get involved easily. Going back to the basics, the book tells the reader exactly what a mind map is and ho w to create and accessorize one. It then goes on to say how such techniques could be useful; in taking notes, lectures and presentations, gathering research and assembling information, collecting thoughts and developing solutions, and much, much more.

I was also surprised to note that there is even a section on writing; fiction and non-fiction with details on structuring paragraphs, getting specific, and so on. This was definitely an added bonus - I hadn't been expecting this information, but I certainly found it useful.

I eagerly absorbed all the information given on planning, making lists and setting goals - all of this is useful in the work that I do. And the better I do the planning, lists and setting goals, the more I'll achieve. I suspect even the information on group mind mapping will be helpful in the future, when I work on my next co-project.

What I liked best was the fact that the book is sympathetic towards different learning met hods, and how different people are. It helped in this respect by providing information on varying types of mind maps - so there's something in there for everyone.

Rounding up with details of mind mapping software and apps, I came out feeling like a veritable expert on mind maps. I just have to put the knowledge into practice now! Overall, I feel this book will definitely help me to become more efficient in my work. The easy to understand instructions and writing style ensure that anyone can read it and learn about mind mapping techniques without feeling intimidated.

So, if you're interested in mind mapping, grab this book and you'll find a method that's right for you.
Katerina
Katerina
Before "Katerina," I was aware of James Frey, not for the right reasons, and not that I had any real opinion of those reasons, but I had never read any of his work. Then I read a few reviews saying that "Katerina" might have been the worst thing published this year -- which made me pay attention. You can't buy that kind of publicity.

The plot is simple: a series of mysterious Facebook messages stirs the memory of a middle-aged writer, someone who had once been great but made mistakes and now was getting by, heck was doing better than most, but hadn't been inspired in a long time. The memories bring him back, back to when he was lost kid who had picked up Henry Miller's "Tropic of Cancer," gotten wowed by its prose, and moved to Paris to soak up all the art, beauty and energy of that magical city. His hope is that by doing this he can become a writer himself; but not just any writer, a writer who, in his own words -- "burns the world down."

The problem is, Paris is... Paris. So he drinks. Drinks a lot. Drinks more than Ernest Hemingway, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Hunter S. Thompson and Charles Bukowski combined. And when he isn't drinking he's dealing with the after-effects of drinking. Which doesn't stop him from sleeping with a handful of beautiful Parisian women. And falling in love. And writing a whole bunch of garbage. Which is the heart of the story, and the source of the mysterious Facebook messages.

If this all sounds slightly narcissistic, I mean... it is. And yet the book serves as a kind of wish-fulfillment fantasy; our young narrator puts us in Paris with him, all unbridled energy, ambition and libido. He drinks and has sex and writes and reads and drinks and has more sex and writes and reads and fights and has even more sex and drinks and has sex again and drinks and drinks and drinks and has sex one last time and then drinks and drinks and drinks some more. The self-loathing does become a bit tiring and the plot is little more than a gap year abroad -- the cartoon version -- and still, you can't put the thing down. Or, at least I couldn't. You just don't see books like this anymore.

In the end, what I liked most was the narrator's naivety. Here is a dumb kid who, even as an adult, wants to be a legend. And isn't afraid to say so. He self-loathes and self-destructs, but never loses that tender sincerity, that undying spirit, that life-long search for the next great romance, rarely found in life itself, but undeniably present in books, art, music!

And that is what "Katerina" ultimately is — a rekindling of that flame, a rediscovery of a time long forgotten, when romance was real, and to one particular young author, everything was possible.
The American Axis: Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich
The American Axis: Henry Ford, Charles Lindbergh, and the Rise of the Third Reich
Das Thema ist wirklich sehr wichtig, durch welchen Personenkreis kurz nach der Machtergreifung Lenins in Russland die gefälschten Protokolle in den USA, England, Deutschland und Frankreich verbreitet wurden und mit Hilfe welcher Organisationen. Dem Autor ist also dafür zu danken, den Blick darauf geworfen zu haben.

Leider kommt ihm kein Verdacht gegen die maßgeblichen Personen wie Boris Brasol, Casimir Pilenas, Dr. Harris Houghton, Natalie De Bogory und Mary Karadja, welche professionelle Agenten der USA, Englands und Russlands gewesen sind und Kontakte zu den Büros der Dienste hielten, etwa dem United States Department of War angehörten, dass sie ihre Rolle nur im Auftrag der Dienste gespielt haben und gar keine Antisemiten, sondern eben Agenten waren.

Casimir Pilenas war ein britischer Agent und in die Belagerung der Sidney Street verwickelt gewesen, die durch Churchill seinerzeit eine große Aufmerksamkeit bekam. Vor allem aber war Charles Cleaves Daniels, der die Kampagne von Ford mit den Protokollen dirigierte, der Bruder des zum Ende des Weltkriegs amtierenden Josephus Daniels, Secretary of the Navy, ein Freund des späteren Präsidenten Roosevelt, der damals sein Assistant Secretary of the Navy war.

Boris Brasol wurde später als sowjetischer Agent erkannt, der in den USA mit der Pushkin Society und deren General Viktor Yakhontoff verbunden war, auch ein ehemaliger zaristischer Offizier, der zum pro-sowjetischen Propagandisten wurde. Ein FBI-Report von 1942 meldet den Verdacht unter den Exilrussen in den USA, dass Boris Brasol ein Informant der Sowjets gewesen ist, der als ihr angeblicher Gegner deren wirkliche Gegner zu unterwandern und zu zersetzen beauftragt war.

Da hätte es einen kritischeren Blick auf diese lächerlichen gefälschten Protokolle und die Motive ihrer Verbreitung in der Welt gebraucht. Hatten sie möglicherweise den Zweck, wegen des russischen Bürgerkriegs die Weißrussen, die Anhänger des Zarismus, als Antisemiten anzuschwärzen, die dann von England und den USA auf keinen Fall unterstützt werden durften? Kann sein, dass der Autor den Gedanken nicht wagen durfte und all diese Agenten in ihrer professionellen Rolle für echte Antisemiten halten sollte, aber dafür kann ich nur drei Sterne geben.
Pendulum: The story of America's three aviation pioneers--Wilbur Wright, Orville Wright, and Glenn Curtiss, the Henry Ford of aviation
Pendulum: The story of America's three aviation pioneers--Wilbur Wright, Orville Wright, and Glenn Curtiss, the Henry Ford of aviation
Pendulum is written for the serious student of early aviation history. Unlike most stories that focus on the Wright brothers' struggles before Dec. 17, 1903, this book delves into what happened AFTER Kitty Hawk.
In 1908 Glenn Curtiss won the Scientific American Magazine trophy for the first public flight in America. It was he, not the Wright brothers, who received instant fame and glory. He built and sold civilian airplanes while they focused on a single sale to the American, British or French Army.
The book explains how early chronicles touted Glenn Curtiss, not the Wrights, as the pioneer of aviation. Thousands of Curtiss JN-4 "Jennys" were used to train WW-I pilots. Today the pendulum has swung to the opposite extreme. Few people know of Curtiss, inventer of the flying boat and father of naval aviation, but everyone has seen the photo of Orville Wright's famous "First Flight" at Kitty Hawk.
In a sometimes dry account, Jack Carpenter meticulously compares step-by-step progress of the three men, with more rare photos than any other book. He tells how they were influenced by Alexander Graham Bell, inventer of the telephone, and Henry Ford, the father of mass produced automobiles.
Having studied the lives of all three men, I think Pendulum is the only book that gives an unbiased account of the bitter patent lawsuit that delayed the growth of American aviation for 10 years.
Dangerous Charisma: The Political Psychology of Donald Trump and His Followers
Dangerous Charisma: The Political Psychology of Donald Trump and His Followers
The title of Jerrold Post, MD and Stephanie Doucette’s book, “Dangerous Charisma:The Political Psychology of Donald Trump and His Followers,” intrigued me. Given Dr. Post’s background as a 21 year veteran of the CIA with a specialty in political personal profiling I was expecting for a deep and revealing exploration. Broken into three multiple chaptered sections: I) The Charismatic Leader, II) The Political Psychology of Trump’s Followers, and III) Trump’s Impact; the book is organized well and written in a highly readable fashion. The first section is quite good in establishing: the topic of ‘personal political psychology;’ what charismatic leaders and how they arise developmentally; and how Donald Trump’s family, upbringing and adult life fit within this rubric. Dr. Post raises the classic psychology/psychiatric diagnosis issue of the ‘Goldwater Rule’ - the American Psychiatric Associations prohibition on making diagnosis at a distance of public figures, and makes it clear that despite this rule he feels compelled to use his expertise to comment on our 45th President. My expectations were still quite high. But then the second section fell completely flat. It was chuck full of disturbing facts about the President (and his followers), but with the exception of utilizing the Presidents own books and written word (which few others have done effectively), there is little new information here that hasn’t been covered multiple times in other works. Insights into the President’s psychological profile is not particularly insightful not deep, leaving me wanting much more. Surprisingly the authors don’t even refer to other mental health professionals who have more significantly broken with the Goldwater rule to provide insights about the President (e.g., Dr. Brandy Lee’s “
The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump: 37 Psychiatrists and Mental Health Experts Assess a President” and Justin Frank’s “Trump on the Couch: Inside the Mind of the President”). This is a huge oversight that could have strengthened the authors discussion. Unfortunately both of the books cited here are more insightful than Post and Doucette’s book. The last section of the book is decent, maybe stronger then the section section but not as strong as the first. Moreover, the books conclusions are flat feeling to this reviewer. Overall a decent book, easy engaging read, but not a lot of new stuff, despite the promise of more. 3 of 5 stars.
Bob Dylan for Easy Piano
Bob Dylan for Easy Piano
Easy to play and gives me the opportunity to improvise with both hands. (Only thing is that I cannot remember what I played the last time) It's the melody and the chords that are important for me. Otherwise playing pieces as they are is pretty simple, at least as I see it. Unfortunately I do not recognise most of the pieces. Not the book's fault but nevertheless. I should have read the contents more closely.
Hard Rain
Hard Rain
It is what it is, "Hard Rain". Maybe messy. Maybe magnificent. Maybe messily magnificent. Despite its remastering for the "Complete Works" box set, there are still a few problems with the somewhat muddy sound, for me. On the other hand, there is definitely an ad hoc energy about it. Personally, I prefer the "Rolling Thunder Bootleg Series" from the same period, by far. This does catch an artist and a band just "going for it" in a slightly shambolic but enthusiastic manner though. It is raw and edgy and, as many have commented in the years since it was released, Dylan was going through a bit of an angry, relationship breakdown period and this undoubtedly affected his gritted teeth, committed performance. Of course, it is a vitally important album, chronologically, in Dylan's career. More so than its musical worth, probably.

It is worth noting that the tracks are taken from two concerts - Fort Collins Colorado and Fort Worth, Texas (the performances from the latter are asterisked below). So, there is not the continuity of a single show. This adds to the disorganised feel of the album. Another observation is that Dylan wore a biblical style head-dress for the Fort Collins show of the sort worn by children in nativity plays. His appearance was, intentional or not, very Messiah-like.

TRACK LISTING

1. Maggie's Farm
2. One Too Many Mornings
3. Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again*
4. Oh Sister*
5. Lady Lady Lay*
6. Shelter From The Storm
7. You're A Big Girl Now
8. I Threw It All Away*
9. Idiot Wind

"Maggie's Farm" is rocking and ramshackle, full of unrestrained vitality. "One Too Many Mornings" is enhanced by some excellent violin from Scarlet Rivera. "Stuck Inside Of Mobile With The Memphis Blues Again" is done vibrantly, with a catchy bass line from Rob Stoner. Dylan is on fine form, vocally, on this too, doing the wordy song justice, thankfully.

"Oh Sister" again features that lovely violin and a strong delivery from Dylan. "Lady Lady Lay" is a bit muffled, sound-wise, with a bit of background hiss. Maybe it was chucking it down at the time. "Shelter From The Storm" is given a slightly reggae-ish makeover on its verses and it positively bristles with an almost punky anger as Dylan spits and bellows out the lyrics. It is a radical re-working of the reflective number we all know from "Blood On The Tracks". It is quite visceral in places.

"You're A Big Girl Now" has a fetching guitar backing and Dylan's delivery is suitably respectful of the sombre, plaintive original. Nice piano on it too. One of the album's best interpretations. "I Threw It All Away" is the only live performance of it that I have. Unfortunately it is a slightly grating, at times, delivery of one of "Nashville Skyline"'s best songs. Dylan's voice is jarring, as is the unnecessarily clashing guitar sound. Then, of course, there is "Idiot Wind". For many, this is the definitive performance of the song. As far as I know it is the only official live cut of the track. It is certainly the only one I have. It is a snarling, incredibly wired rendition of the song, and by far the best track on the album. Not only is an irked Dylan "up for it" but the band are too. When he sings "I can't feel you anymore..." he sounds close to tears. All his raging glory, indeed.

Overall, despite its cultural importance, for me it is nowhere near his best live work. For a lot of people it is, though, and that is fair enough. I can sort of see why, but I can never get past the less-than-perfect sound.
Legendary Broadcasts: 1969-1984 by Bob Dylan
Legendary Broadcasts: 1969-1984 by Bob Dylan
A collection of five live TV performances. Of the five shows, three are important for any Dylan fan: "The World of John Hammond Show" in '75 features the performance debut of "Hurricane" and it does not disappoint. The Saturday Night Live show in '79 debuts three songs from his gospel album "Slow Train Coming." (Kind of humorous to hear Dylan forget some of the words of "Gotta Serve Somebody" and instead repeat the lines about "You may be rich or poor..." for a second time.) The third show is the one that is indispensable--the '84 Letterman Show. Three songs with a three piece Latino punk band named The Plugz. Incredible energy--this version of "Jokerman" is priceless. This was the only performance of Bob and the Plugz. It is rough, sloppy--and utterly magnificent. According to the band members, there was some talk of Bob and the Plugz doing some more work together, but it never came to fruition. 'Tis a pity--it boggles the mind to consider what might have been during Dylan's mid '80's fallow period had he done more work with this band. Sound quality is quite acceptable for a non-official release. If it becomes available again, snap it up!
Deadpool 2: Super Duper Cut (Unrated Version)
Deadpool 2: Super Duper Cut (Unrated Version)
After the success of the first Deadpool movie, the wise cracking fourth wall breaking hitman gets a sequel. Which will not make a lot of sense to those who haven't seen the first film. If you haven't, why are you reading this? Go and watch it. Then come back.

After the end of the first film, can Wade and Vanessa live happily ever after? Would they have a movie if so? Fate leaves Deadpool looking for purpose. The X Men might not be the answer. A mysterious boy with special powers and a time travelling killer called Cable [Josh Brolin] might be...

Sequels are tricky things. People want the same. But different. But there's enough mileage and flexibility in this format to allow for enough variety to make it click. And when you're throwing gags at the screen at such a rate, most are likely to connect.

It's a little stronger plot wise than the first film. It is of course not going to have the freshness and originality of that, but there is still enough great fun and good jokes to make it an entertaining watch. With a bigger cast some characters don't get as much to do as you might like, but Josh Brolin makes a very good Cable, Zazie Beetz is a superb Domino and really deserves her own franchise. And Peter's pretty cool too.

There are some bad reviews of this out there, so it might be a matter of subjective opinion. But if you loved the first film, give this a go. As to whether you should watch to the end of the credits, didn't you learn anything from what you were told at the end of that one????

The disc begins with the fox logo, but then goes into the menu with no ads or trailers.

Although the box just says English for subtitles and languages, I checked the disc, and it's actually:

Languages: English. English audio description. Russian. Ukrainian.
Subtitles: English. Russian. Danish, Swedish. Finnish. Estonian. Latvian. Lithuanian. Ukrainian.

Extras: A three minute long gag reel. If you've seen one gag reel, you've seen them all. People doing silly dances and pulling faces and the occasional outtake that raises a slight smile. This is no different.

Deadpool's fun sack 2: contains a stills gallery. This is pretty funny with an interesting collection of items and posters and worth a look.

And videos. Roughly forty mins in total, which can be watched individually or all together.

No good deed. [featuring...you'll see....]
Wet on wet.
Brazil comic con tattoos.
Deadpool meet cable.
Red band [ie same as above with strong language] Deadpool meet cable.
The trailer.
Red band trailer.
Final trailer.
Red band the final trailer.
Imax psa.
Celine Dion singing ashes video.
Behind the scenes of ashes.
Eur missing a country.
Deadpool takes over Manchester united.
The first ten years.
Welcome to the party pop video.
Deadpool two thanks you.

Some repetition seeing the trailers in a row, but a lot of fun in the above. It doesn't have the apology to David Beckham one though, if you were looking for that.
O Monte Cinco (Portuguese Edition)
O Monte Cinco (Portuguese Edition)
In "O Monte Cinco" (the Fifth Mountain), Paulo Coelho develops the biblical story of Elijah,into a fictional narrative of romance, success, tragedy, crisis of faith, and resumption of belief, against a backdrop of war, invasion, devastation, and reconstruction.
if that plot summary makes it sound formulaic and hackneyed, what sets "O Cinco Monte" apart is Coelho's prose style.

I read "O Monte Cinco" in Brazilian Portuguese, which I never studied, (my college major was Spanish literature). However, I was able to visualize almost every situation in the book, without a dictionary, because of the power and immanency of Coelho's imagery. For that quality alone, if any novel cried out for a screen adaption, it is this one.
Tucker: A Novel
Tucker: A Novel
Could there be any question that Louis L’Amour is possibly the best-known and most popular westerns writer of all time? I have read lots of books in my life – many of them westerns – and enjoyed most of them. But darned, if I want to treat myself, I can almost always come back to a Louis L’Amour western and not be disappointed.

Off the top of my head, I can suggest several reasons for this.

The first, of course, is that while he may not be the world’s greatest Writer, he is a terrific Story-teller, who knows how to catch the reader from the very beginning. Take the first sentence in the first paragraph of the first chapter of his novel, Tucker: “When I rode up to the buffalo wallow pa was lying there with his leg broke and his horse gone.”

In only 19 words, all but one less than 3 syllables, he has set up the story, introduced the characters, complete with back story, and raises questions in the reader’s mind as to, “What is going on here? What is coming next?”

The second is that he respects the myth and legend of the west. His protagonist, Edwin “Shell” Tucker is a hero, but he is a hero because he remains true to himself and his goal: Not to gain revenge but to recover money entrusted to him by his friends back in his hometown. He is afraid, but he doesn’t stop. He is not invulnerable; he is shot more than once, but survives and keeps on going.

The third is that he also respects the true history of the west, warts and all. Yes, it was a beautiful land that was surely ravaged by the men moving west, but those same men also faced almost unimaginable hardships to make come true their dreams of land, home, and future for themselves and their families.

The final and perhaps most interesting is that L’Amour weaves in philosophy – quite quotable philosophy – into the story.

Here are some thoughts about being a man:

• “You never know how tough a man is until you’ve tried him.”

• “A man was what he did, how he shaped up at work, or against trouble.”

• “The thing that shows the man is his willingness to accept responsibility for himself and his actions. Only a tin horn blames what he is on his folks or the times or something else besides himself. There have been good men and great men in all periods of history, and they did it themselves.”

• “A man should stop ever’ now and again and ask himself what he was doing, where he was going, and how he planned to get there. And the hardest thing to learn is that there aren’t any shortcuts.”

• “The fact was staring me right in the face that a man may run all his life and get nowhere.”

• “If you can read, you can learn. You don’t have to go to school to get an education, although it is the best way for most of us, and anyway, all school can give you is the outline of the picture. You have to fill in the blank places yourself, later.”

A good thought to end on: If you can read, you can learn.

As well as giving yourself a treat.
Dragon Ball Z, Vol. 21: Tournament of the Heavens
Dragon Ball Z, Vol. 21: Tournament of the Heavens
In the latest Strongest Under the Heavens tournament, Trunks and Son Goten demolish their opposition in the youth bracket without even trying, and fight one another in the final – but who will get to go up against Hercule? And will he be revealed as the charlatan he is? In the adult tournament, the usual suspects get into the finals as well as some new characters like the mysterious Shin and Kibito. But this tournament becomes truncated as finally Buu (here written as Boo) appears!

It says a lot about his skills as a storyteller and artist that Akira Toriyama can take minor characters like Kuririn and Videl, make them the focus of the book, and still make it as gripping to read as if it were Goku vs Vegeta. Those are the only two who have matches in the tournament – the others qualified but having them fly off to meet a separate, bigger threat shows how much they’ve outgrown this setting. It’s also a notable volume for being the first time a female character – Videl – has had a starring match in the series. She gets the crap beaten out of her but still.

Goten and Trunks are adorable as they try to sneak into the adults’ tournament standing on each other’s shoulders hidden under a costume as Mighty Mask – and yet nobody’s the wiser! The people in the DBZ world are the most gullible, brain-dead people ever. They see characters flying, firing fireballs, and changing their hair colour instantly, right in front of them, but they still insist everything’s “a trick”. It’d be like if the people in the DC or Marvel universes didn’t acknowledge that Superman or Spider-Man were real! At a certain point, you’ve gotta make the surrounding world acknowledge the superheroes in it.

This volume’s (thankfully) a good read after quite a few duds. It’s a classic Dragon Ball-type book with great martial arts action in a tournament setting and I really liked it. That and the Buu storyline kicking off sees the series returning to form. Here’s hoping it keeps getting better and the series ends on a high!
Witch & Wizard: The Manga, Vol. 3 (Witch & Wizard: The Manga (3))
Witch & Wizard: The Manga, Vol. 3 (Witch & Wizard: The Manga (3))
The final manga(if you can call it that) is quite simply: Closure. there are some pages that will grab your attention more than others;especially the first 7 or so, but if you've read other mangas like this than you know the song and dance.

Artwork: decent to above average...not saying this is bad.the artist illustrating the book keeps things on a good level of overall quality including backgrounds,sizing of side effects and text bubbles and facial/character designs.one noteworthy thing i would like to say is that for an American(?)/western artist, it handles the feeling of showing motion a bit better than most works.

Story: taken from a book and put into a manga-like format the story took(most likely) the major points of the plot then ignored the rest; at the cost of most of the book's possible originality. the book along with the other 2 beforehand, follow standard formula with 'magic is actually real' plots: a finds out secret from loved ones, loved ones are taken/disappear, villain tries to take over the world,yata yata. the story as it is good,but they really should have allowed more bits and pieces from the book(reading book) carry over to the manga,even if it took the artist a bit longer to finish and the price to go up a little bit. as it is though, its good but not fantastic.

Aside from a slight amount of melancholy, the manga is enjoyable,and a decent way to spend some quiet time alone. it is visually sound and while not completely original,does have it charm..though a bit corny. with my personal praise for the artist and my overall enjoy both with this particular book and the series as a whole: I recommend.
Gerber Baby 2-Pack Sleep 'N Play
Gerber Baby 2-Pack Sleep 'N Play
I am writing this review now because tonight I found a hole in the all over cloud printed one. I received my order less than a month ago. Normally I don’t like to leave negative reviews because I know that there can be some manufacturing errors etc. with production of items but I’m rather sad because I loved this sleeper on my daughter! She’s 4 months old, only weighs 13lbs (so not chunky enough to cause a hole) and she admittedly has a lot of clothes but this sleeper is the first one to not make it. Normally I buy Carters or Wonder Nation sleepers from Walmart and I haven’t had any issues until now. I’m rather bummed but I do think they fit well and they look cute so I will give them that- plus the blue one with the clouds on it is still hole-free.
Sas les trois veuves de hong kong
Sas les trois veuves de hong kong
Ce qui m’a plu: comme d’habitude le dépaysement, le dosage entre violence, sexe, amour, nostalgie
Ce qui m’as déplu? Pas grand chose...
Timeline: A Novel
Timeline: A Novel
*****SPOILERS*****
Early on the characters start out going into painful details about quantum mechanics that, even as a serious Sci-Fi fan, I found tedious and booing. Then they make a SERIOUS, and rather stand-out point that time travel is impossible and they are actually traveling into alternate universes... OK!! I can get with that! The fact that alternate universes would exist in different time periods (they travel to an alternate universe which exists in the 1300s.) seemed very strange, but I was willing to go with it. I mean it IS fiction, I'll go with your unique twist on how alternate universes exist. But when a person who traveled to an alternate universe was able to leave a "Help Me" note in a pile of old parchments in the 1300s which is found in THIS universe, it took a turn that made NO Sense at ALL.

After that, the book just goes on and on and on in the 1300s and nothing actually happens.. it's a game of tag. Run. Hide. Get Captured. Escape. Run. Hide. Get Captured. Escape. Get into a fight. Run. Hide. Get Captured. Escape. Just trying to waste time in the book (about 50% of it) until the machine automatically returns home.

I powered through the last 3/4 of the book just waiting to get to what I expected was a Twist ending discovering that the scientists misinterpreted the "Alternate Universe" theory and they WERE actually traveling back in time.... but no. The characters returned home from the alternate universe only to check out the grave of one of their party members who stayed behind... which, AGAIN, WOULDN'T EXIST IN THIS UNIVERSE.

Characters: Not interesting
Story: Not interesting
Sci-fi: Nonsensical.
The Rubber Band/The Red Box 2-in-1 (Nero Wolfe)
The Rubber Band/The Red Box 2-in-1 (Nero Wolfe)
In my opinion these are not as good as the first two books Rex Stout wrote, especially The Red Box. It seems like Stout was still trying to establish characteristics for the main characters. There are several points that I'm glad he dropped or changed.

The Rubber Band is about a woman who tries to collect on a forty year old obligation. A murder occurs involving one of the people from the original group to whom the debt is owed. The biggest problem is locating the man who incurred the debt all those years ago. Another murder is committed so the number of people who can potentially recognize someone from forty years ago is greatly reduced. It takes clever detective ability on Wolfe's part to figure out who the murderer is and the circumstances surrounding the original aspect of the case.

The Red Box begins with a model dying after eating a poisoned chocolate. The question is whether she was the intended victim. There is shuffling around with first one person being Wolfe's client then another. It seemed to me there were areas of repetitions and unclear action. Two more people die. I read most of the stories in the Wolfe saga before this one so I'm not sure how I would have felt if I had read this book in the order it was written. There were inconsistencies in character that detracted from the story for me. There was an unexpected twist with a surprise at the end. The mystery of the story made this a good book.

I have decided to read all the stories in the order they were written. I am an ardent Rex Stout fan and can enjoy these books all over again. I highly recommend all of Rex Stout's books, especially the Nero Wolfe series.
Anna and the King
Anna and the King
20th Century Fox certainly got a lot of mileage out of the story of "Anna And The King of Siam." First, there was the 1946 version with Irene Dunne and Rex Harrison. This inspired Rodgers And Hammerstein's magnificent musical version "The King And I", brought to the screen in 1956 starring Deborah Keer and Yul Bryneer. This incarnation stars Jodie Foster and Chow Yun Fat. For some reason, this beautiful 1999 version remains critically under-rated and vastly under-appreciated. The basic plot in all versions is fascinating fiction, based on certain "factual events," concerning the confrontational and complex relationship between British schoolteacher Anna Leonowwens and King Mongkut in 1860's Siam.
The casting of British Rex Harrison as the King Of Siam in the 1946 version is Hollywood preposterous. There's never any real emotional connection between Harrison and Irene Dunne. Deborah Kerr and Yul Bryneer played things more beautifully and brilliantly in "The King And I." The production is marvelous, if obviously studio bound. Here, Chow Yun-Fat is every bit as commanding and charismatic as Yul Bryneer. This King is more human and, as Chow Yun-Fat is actually Asian, probably more authentic as well.
"Anna And The King" plays less like "The King And I" and more like a David Lean epic ( I am mostly thinking of "A Passage To India") from a movie era gone by. While certain plot elements remain in all versions, this version takes the story in some surprisingly different directions. In terms of approach, the musical "The King And I" is about how Anna changes Siam. This "Anna And The King" is about how Siam changes Anna. Played by Jodie Foster, Anna is extremely high-minded and sure in her belief that "the ways of England are the ways of the world." Many of her smug beliefs and values are thrown back in her face after she meets King Mongkut and the people in his palace. By the time of the lavish "anniversary party", thrown mostly to impress the British, Anna is appalled by her country's prejudicial and unfriendly attitudes towards Siam. On a personal level, the King correctly guesses that Anna is so out-spoken and headstrong because she has not yet accepted the death of her husband Tom. She hides her pain behind a wall of "superior British strength." Still, she fights against several social and human injustices. Her manner does not sit well with the Prime Minister who says, "There has been much insult caused by this Englishwoman who thinks herself the equal of a man." A fascinated Mongkut replies, "No, the equal of a King."
There is nothing studio bound about this production. It was filmed on location in Maylaysia. Filming in Thailand was denied because any version of this story is considered controversial and disrespectful to the memory of King Mongkut, making it appear he was dependent upon advice and support from his British Schoolteacher employee. Ironically, the film confronts that issue head on. Anna totally over-steps her position when she tries to save the slave Tuptim (Bai Ling) and her lover Balet (Sean Ghazi) from death. The King can do nothing to save them because Anna has made it appear, in public court, no less, that he takes orders from her. Tuptim and Balet must die in order for the King to "save face" and command authority.
In addition to all this drama, there is added political danger. General Alack attempts a political coup by forcing a war between Siam and Burma. Alack kills the King's brother and several other innocent people, and he plans to kill King Mongkut and all of his wives and children. After the deaths of Tuptim and Balat, Anna prepares to leave Siam. This new danger, however, brings her back to the palace one final time.
Critics complained about Jodie Foster as Anna, and the film's length. I couldn't disagree more! At 2 hours, 26 minutes, the film IS long, but, for me, always absorbing and often heartbreaking. Jodie Foster and Chow Yun-Fat are both brilliant in the leading roles. DVD Extras include a Making of Documentary, 5 production featurettes, a music video, deleted scenes, and audio commentary by director Andy Tennant.
Rowling Revisited: Return Trips to Harry, Fantastic Beasts, Quidditch, & Beedle the Bard
Rowling Revisited: Return Trips to Harry, Fantastic Beasts, Quidditch, & Beedle the Bard
In his classic An Experiment in Criticism, C.S. Lewis posited that one of the criteria by which a book might be judged "good" was its ability to hold up and produce new insights under multiple readings. For example, the mystery novel that is never touched again once one knows "whodunnit" is not good literature, while the "old friend" one reads again and again (as Lewis did Jane Austen's novels, apparently annually) are worthy of attention, regardless of their status as "literature" by other tests. Pepperdine University professor James Thomas has proven again that J.K. Rowling's beloved Harry Potter novels, along with their three ancillary texts, count as "good literature" by this standard, with Rowling Revisited: Return Trips to Harry, Fantastic Beasts, Quidditch, and Beedle the Bard (Zossima, 2010). If you haven't taken a ramble with this delightful volume, you should, and if you have already, then perhaps a repeat trip to this book is in order!
Dr. Thomas, with his characteristic combination of quick wit and vast knowledge of literature, takes the reader on a rollicking ride through the seven Hogwarts adventures, Harry's much graffitied textbooks, and the mysterious book of fairy tales that includes the origin of the Deathly Hallows. In his return to the seven-volume story of Harry Potter, Dr. Thomas is re-returning, as he has previously analyzed the delightful discoveries to be made in coming back to the 4100-page story in seven sections. His Repotting Harry Potter is a delight, but his more recent insights here demonstrate that, for the astute reader, there is always more treasure to be found in a good book, no matter how many visits one makes to it. He points out many of the wonders he has noticed on more recent examination, including examples of Rowling's artistry and even her occasional discrepancies (though, gracefully, pointing out how these demonstrate that the novels were a work in progress, and that Rowling was still shifting and sifting her ideas as she wrote the books and their companion texts). But Dr. Thomas does not merely point out the nifty spots in the scenery as we travel along; he makes wonderful connections with history, literature, and the other books, demonstrating how interconnected the texts are to each other and to the larger literary canon. Though some readers may have already noticed a few of Dr. Thomas's discoveries, his connections with other great works of literature will astound and delight even the most careful reader, and everyone will see at least one new insight. I must confess that even after reading the Hogwarts Saga through completely at least ten times, I had never caught the knee-slapper of Uncle Vernon, who works at a drill company, picking out his most "boring" tie. I thought it was just a reminder of the Dursleys' thoroughly Muggle mindset rather than a hint of Rowling's linguistic playfulness to come.
Then, we get to revisit the much-annotated copies of Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. With news of a forthcoming film featuring the fearless Newt Scamander (sorry, Dr. Thomas takes great delight in Rowling's alliteration, so I think it is beginning to rub off on me), this is a great time to return to this wonderful, if slim, volume. Dr. Thomas walks readers through each entry, noting the literary depth found in each of Rowling's fun creatures. He notes how the fact that the volume appeared as the Hogwarts Saga was still in progress in evident in Rowling's on-going work with some creatures, whose importance or characteristics she was obviously still finalizing that that point. Dr. Thomas's work with this wonderful ancillary text will be much appreciated when Newt hits the big screen.
Quidditch through the Ages also gets a great return treatment, with plenty of thoughtful peeks into the popular Wizarding sport and its historical, athletic, and linguistic nods. Readers who delight in Quidditch, including those who play the Muggle version (I would sign up if there was actual flying, myself). There is enough alliteration in this section (and in the teams themselves) to spawn spontaneous spurts of sarcastic snorts (sorry), and some wonderful reminders that even in this "light" volume, Rowling outdid herself.
Some of the most fantastic insights into Rowling's artistry can be found in the section analyzing her last Hogwarts volume, the sometimes cryptic, often delightful Tales of Beedle the Bard. Even without Emma Watson's peculiarly lovely pronunciation of "figure" in "The Tale of the Three Brothers," the stories are wonderful, and, as Dr. Thomas notes, they draw on a rich literary and cultural history, in addition to creating wonderful links to the seven-volume story of Harry himself. Most haunting, of course, is the chance to "hear" Dumbledore's voice again, and that desire for connection to those we lose, in life or in literature, is part of what drives many of the stories, and perhaps, what makes us want to come back to books over and over again.
Even if one is not as astute a reader as the intrepid Dr. Thomas, re-reading is a chance for us to revisit the stories and characters we love, so that we never really leave them behind. This well-written, thoughtful, and always fun volume will delight, illuminate, and send readers back to enjoy all ten of the books that take us to the Wizarding world, again, and again.

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Baby Bandana Drool Bibs for Girls - Super Absorbent Organic Cotton Bandana Bibs - Baby Drool Bib - Teething Bibs - Handkerchief Bibs for Infant, Toddler - 8-Pack Bib Set - Bib Girl (Bloom)
Baby Bandana Drool Bibs for Girls - Super Absorbent Organic Cotton Bandana Bibs - Baby Drool Bib - Teething Bibs - Handkerchief Bibs for Infant, Toddler - 8-Pack Bib Set - Bib Girl (Bloom)
Arrived Nicely packaged. They are soft and beautiful, I wanted something other than the standard pink with silly characters and these are feminine and the print is perfect for the winter season.
Update: after having these for a few weeks I noticed that the way they are cut forced the bib into my babies face and mouth area actually causing her to drool more. they do a great job of absorbing the drool and keeping her dry but i am going through 3 of these a day vs 1 -2 of a different cut. I would need to sew them to keep them flatter on her chest and I just don’t have the time for it. They are being returned
The Unwritten Vol. 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity
The Unwritten Vol. 1: Tommy Taylor and the Bogus Identity
This is one of the most ambitious Vertigo series ever.
Mike Carey's and Peter Gross's meta-fictional opus has no smaller theme than showing how everything's a story, how stories are everything, how they're the only thing worth dying for. Nobody who's ever taken a fictional book, a scientific text, anything written or told, even a little bit seriously could really argue the point, could they? As comics and TV writer Brian K Vaughan put it, it's a wish-I'd-though-of-it premise that's simply brilliantly executed.
Tom Taylor is the real-life mode of his father Wilson's literary creation, boy-wizard Tommy Taylor. As clues seem to appear that he may be the fake son, events transpire that turn him from wretched con-man to messiah overnight. Resolving once and for all to get rid of the massive shadow cast over him by his literary counterpart, Tom Taylor sets upon the journey to find out what his father was up to, and what his real story is, facing ruthless enemies he never knew he had, armed solely with the literary geography knowledge imparted upon him by his father.
Much to his chagrin - and to the reader's delight, it must be said - he reluctantly finds out that there may be, let's say... more fiction to the truth than he'd ever wished for!
Ignoring the Harry Potter and The Who references here is not a problem, as the authors do a better job than Mrs Rowling with the first, and pay a humble, respectful homage to the second. In perfect Unwritten fashion, there may even be a nod to the fact that there's no way somebody would have seriously come up with Harry Potter if they had no propaganda plan behind it...
And that's how much the book gets you, because the level of conspiracy theory here is appallingly high, complex and clever. It is woven into the fabric of the story, thus of the book and of the world. See? There's really no getting rid of the premise once you sink your teeth into it.
Kudos to Mike Carey for coming up with this brilliant and for displaying an encyclopedic and caring knowledge of literature.
And since this story is told in comic book form, more power to the veteran artist - and occasionally writer, as well as pretty much a co-writer on the book - that he's teamed with here, the great Peter Gross. The extras in this volume show how aptly he adapted Mike Carey's prose in re-creating the book inside the book, that is the Tommy Taylor novels, in comic book form. You do have the impression of reading the book and reading a comic in which the book is just a story device at the same time, receiving maximum pleasure from both. No small feat at all! And aside from that, he simply is a very good, minimalist artist, who doesn't need to be flashy or showy to deliver solid, powerful storytelling and art.
These opening issues set a very high bar for the rest of the series and really put a lot at stake. Anyway, I'll be along for the ride and I'll be proud and delighted in being a part of this story. Will you?

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