Dexter Campbell

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Gods & Generals
Gods & Generals
Doesn't matter if you ever see the movie, this soundtrack will grab you and hold on. It's emotional without ever being "in your face," as some epic orchestrations have been. It haunts you.
Much to my surprise, Bob Dylan's song is both fitting and well-done, and I was never a Dylan fan. The etherial quality of Mary Fahl's performance in "Going Home" simply has to be heard.
The music videos are a wonderful bonus. Overall, though, the orchestral pieces portray the sadness of a nation tearing itself apart, and it's powerful in a way far exceeding the typical epic style music. Mark O'Conner is one of the best fiddle players in America; here, as in The Patriot, he is key to the music's overall beauty.
This one's a keeper.
Super Hero Compression Sport T-Shirt Fitness Tee Gym Running Cycling Top
Super Hero Compression Sport T-Shirt Fitness Tee Gym Running Cycling Top
Update: The seller contacted me and apologized for the sizing issue. They're in the process of refunding me and have sent me new shirt, hopefully one that fits. I'll write more once I see that I've been refunded and when the shirt arrives. I'm pleased that they're being proactive about this.

I ordered the small Captain America Winter soldier compression shirt from the this retailer and I was very happy with it. It fits perfectly and is a very good quality compression shirt. I thought I would be getting a similar product with the small Endgame uniform shirt but I was very wrong. The small shirt is gigantic - I would say closer in size to a large. It doesn't fit, even after being washed. Also the fabric isn't very comfortable. It seems itchy in comparison to the Captain America shirt. I would not recommend the Endgame product.
Rin-Ne, Vol. 3
Rin-Ne, Vol. 3
No Rumiko Takahashi series would be complete without at least one love triangle, and apparently her latest series is no exception. "Rin-Ne Volume 3" introduces a new character who has a major thang for Sakura, and provides a little urgency in the romantic tension between Sakura and Rinne -- as well as causing some professional problems for Rinne.

There's a new transfer student at the school: Tsubasa Jumonji, a childhood friend of Sakura's who is still carrying a huge torch for her. He also happens to be a professional exorcist -- and when Rinne tries to help a ghost pass on, the boys end up locked in a huge romantic/professional rivalry. Rinne in particular is shaken by the possibility that Sakura is going to date Tsubasa (although he denies it).

First they end up clashing during a double-date with a ghost. Then when Rinne goes hunting for a ghost with a massive bounty, he discovers that Tsubasa has a connection to a bathroom ghost named Hanako, whom he exorcised as a small child. Now Hanako wants revenge -- and she is borrowing power from a terrible source.

And during the school festival, Rinne learns that a malevolent damashigami (evil shinigami) has switched faces with the school's hottest boy, and is using it to spirit away all the girls for his own ends. To save them, he'll use the most extreme means available. And finally, boys at the school are being found beaten up with their faces covered in ink, apparently because of a faceless ghost!

The big centerpiece of "Rin-Ne Volume 3" is the introduction of Tsubasa, who's the third point of a Rinne/Sakura/Tsubasa love triangle -- he's like a more ruthless, romantic, goofier version of Rinne, and Takahashi makes us like him even if we're rooting for Rinne. Even more important, he seems to be lighting a fire under Rinne, even though the young shinigami is still in complete denial about his feelings.

He also introduces a rather different dynamic to Takahashi's story, since now our hero is in constant competition and Rokudo is kind of worried ("EMERGENCY! Sakura-sama's walking home all friendly with a boy!"). But Takahashi doesn't lean too hard on the love triangle -- the focus is still firmly on ghosts and their troublesome problems.

She also packs this manga with all sorts of weird attacks (toilet paper, Bibles and a girly-looking wand) and hilarious moments ("I'M IN THE RED," Rinne says, crying tears of blood), as well as some rather impressive magical battles. And there's the one thing required of most manga: Rinne ends up spending most of a chapter running around in a maid costume... and he looks darn good.

"Rin-ne Volume 3" adds some tension to Rumiko Takahashi's supernatural series, as well as some typically weird ghostly matters -- and it promises to get even better now that Tsubasa's here.
The Outlaws of Mesquite
The Outlaws of Mesquite
Sorry folks. but although I read everything L'Amour has written with enjoyment, I am not particularly fond of his Short Story "Fill in" attempts to keep the ball rolling. As each of us have periods where /when our thought patterns do not function normally, I believe the Short Story's are holdovers from his periods of doing the Hopalong Cassidy series, and some of the add in Short Stories, especially those related to Boxing,seem more like something Micky Spellan or Shell Schot would have dreamed up. Just my opinion, and I realize not all wear the same size shoes. One of my favorite;s in his written word is "The Walking Drum", for it took me to places I have never been, and to some I had never even heard of, but three other of his fan's found it boring,
Buddha, Vol. 6: Ananda
Buddha, Vol. 6: Ananda
Book 6 of Osamu Tzuka’s 8 volume version of Buddha, sub titled Ananda is like book 5, something of a let-down. Taken as part of a longer sequence this is a mid-way slump like I have experienced in many another long book. Having achieved Godhead status as the Enlightened One Buddha will be challenged by Ananda. Ananda is the child of humans. His parents were hunted down and murdered for the crime of belonging to a now defeated nation race. He is placed under the protection of an evil demon spirit. She intends to use her foreknowledge that Ananda is fated to confront The Buddha and the price of her protection is that Ananda should defeat The Buddha.

Is it really a spoiler to mention that a human (even with a demon backup) against a godhead is not a fair fight?

Mostly this book is about Buddha meeting and collecting his inner circle of followers. This is a fairly traditional sequences of set piece conversion stories. Tezuka pretty much follows conventions with a few details making them his own.

There are his usual anachronisms. For a change almost all are confined to spoken ones and almost all serve to help keep a link between ancient and modern worlds. The level of art work is not as beautiful as some of the earlier books, but there are still many pages that are beautiful.
This is a very violent world so we can expect the killings and tortures to continue. The Buddha does get to share his wisdom, but the emphasis on the themes of Let it be and accept what you have ring hollow. The logic of these philosophies only work if you accept that life can only be lived in extremes. Indeed, the entire series to date could be re focused on the need to be moderate while taking care when you may be tempted to compromise principals.

A mid-section slump is not rare in this volume of labor. I already own Volume 7 and will certainly finish this version of Buddhism lite.
The Fugitive Trail
The Fugitive Trail
Zane Grey writes a five-star story of a girl named Trinity Spencer, so named because a family named Spencer finds her abandoned near the Trinity River in Texas, which flows mainly north and south and goes west of Dallas. She grows to young womanhood in the Spencer home near Denison (barely on the Texas side of the Red River), and falls for the weaker of two twins, the Lockheart brothers.

The weak brother joins an outlaw gang and helps rob a bank in Denison; Bruce, the strong one, talks the weak one into letting him take the fall, Trinity overhears the conversation, drops the weak Lockheart, and rides a stagecoach west, the direction she thinks Bruce went. She eventually reaches a ranch owned by a man named Melrose, who turns out to be her true father; she plans to stop there for a time. Bruce shows up, and the remainder of the book is about the love between Bruce and Trinity, about an effort by Bruce to be someone else, about the Texas Ranger hunt for Bruce, and about a fight in which Bruce, a group of cowboys, and a group of Texas Rangers take on a bunch of cattle rustlers.

The book tells the location of the Melrose ranch relative to Llano Estacado and the Brazos River, but it's hard to understand; I think it's somewhere near a north-south line between Dickens and Clarendon, east of Lubbock and Amarillo. The story's as good a western as I've read, ever. David Carlyle, "Another Land."
Terminal Man
Terminal Man
The Terminal Man is a book that Stephen King convinced me to read. I read King's short story called "The Woman In The Room." The story is in King's collection Night Shift and briefly mentions how, according to Crichton, putting wires in people's heads can be a very bad scene. It took me a few years to get to it but I finally did and enjoyed it but not as much as I thought I would. Still, insane scientists and doctors terrify me and experimental surgery is some scary stuff. To show you what I mean, the corny scene from the film Batman and Robin in which Bane is created always gives me chills. You can understand then, if you have seen that humorously aweful film, how this book would effect me. It was a bit short though and, again for Crichton novels, it was anticlimactic in my opinion. A good read nonetheless though, especially for Crichton fans.
Lost City: A Kurt Austin Adventure
Lost City: A Kurt Austin Adventure
I have enjoyed all of Cussler's Pitt and Oregon novels. They are exciting, surprising and well written. I began this series with the first book written and have read all that follow up to Lost City; I'll not be reading more, this was my last effort to like this series. The writing is tedious, the characters are always the same and the female is always the ultimate beauty and love interest of Austin. All I know of Austin and Zavala are that they are womanizers and miraculously get in and out of unbelievable situations all for the apparent motive of getting the girl and not "saving the world" as other more intriguing Cussler novels. It's undoubtedly perfect for some, not for me...give me more science and action! FYI...I am a female suspense/action reader in the order of Clancy et al and will continue to read Cussler's books; hoping to find other plots, action and characters as good as those in the Pitt and Oregon novels.
Black Crags
Black Crags
In this well-written tale a doctor is called to a top secret military facility to help deal with an outbreak of some kind of sickness. The only thing is that he's not really a doctor and curing the disease is not really one of his priorities.

I enjoyed this tale. It had a flavor reminiscent of a classic Alistair MacLean story and could almost serve as a spiritual successor to his novel Ice Station Zebra. The story takes time to build and it is perfectly upfront with the reader in letting you know that there is more going on here than just what's on the surface.

The characters are distinct and well drawn. I had no problem remembering who was who (which was important as the plot grew in complexity- more on that in a minute.)

The action is solid without being fake or overdone. The protagonist is not a superhero and he would be the first to admit that he's probably in over his head.

There are 2 things that I wasn't crazy about. One is that the plot has so many false turns, red herrings, and smoke and mirrors that by the end of the story things seems to have gotten a little over convoluted. I had a little bit of trouble understanding all the protagonists actions after the final reveal was made. I may reread this some day just to get the details straight in my head. (This "complaint" is probably more a reflection of my mental abilities rather than the author's writing abilities.)

Furthermore a few of the plot points are... improbable. Part of the fun of fiction is that the plot doesn't always have to be grounded in reality 100% but this story sometimes strained my my ability to suspend disbelief. It is fairly common for this type of story however, so I really don't hold it against the author. These "complaints" I have made are strictly for the author's sake (if he is interested in feedback,) and should not be considered a deterrent to reading the story. Despite any nitpicking I found this to be an excellent story.

Highly Recommended, especially for readers who enjoy spy stories full of deception, as well as fans of Alistair MacLean's novels such as Ice Station Zero, Puppet On A Chain and Where Eagles Dare.
Von Bullerbü bis Lönneberga: Die schönsten Geschichten von Astrid Lindgren
Von Bullerbü bis Lönneberga: Die schönsten Geschichten von Astrid Lindgren
Eine schöne Sammlung von Astrid Lindgren Geschichten. Es sind einige Kurzgeschichten dabei, aber auch Auszüge aus Büchern wie Ronja Räubertochter, Kalle Blomqvist und natürlich Pippi Langstrumpf. Die Auszüge werden mit einem kurzen Text eingeleitet, der den Kontext zur ganzen Geschichte darstellt.
Einige Kurzgeschichten und Auszüge sind für Kinder ab drei Jahren geeignet (z. B. Pelle zieht aus, Ich will auch Geschwister haben). Je nachdem, wie lange ein Kind schon zuhören mag und kann und natürlich abhängig vom Wortschatz sind zumindest inhaltlich gut dreiviertel der enthaltenen Geschichten auch für so kleine Ohren gut geeignet.
Aber auch für größere Kinder, die schon lesen können, gibt es noch spannende Geschichten zu entdecken,wie Kalle Blomqvist oder Mio, mein Mio.
Zu den wunderschönen Geschichten kommen die tollen Zeichnungen, die viele Seiten zieren. Ein echtes Schmuckstück im Bücherregal, das uns hoffentlich lange Zeit begleiten wird!
Spinners Lake: Book Five in the stunningly heartwarming Gibson Family Saga
Spinners Lake: Book Five in the stunningly heartwarming Gibson Family Saga
Had to choose a book from a limited selection and took book 1 of the Gibson saga, Salem Street. Worked my way through all five now, as they are riveting good stories. A bit of continuity mishaps here and there - the youngest child born to John has a name change, and people's ages slip back and forth a year or two. Some of the happenings are a bit unrealistic - John the lay preacher had no hesitation in impregnating his very young housekeeper without marriage - would cause a scandal now never mind then. Loved reading about Annie but found her somewhat annoying - her habit of marrying for money as well as love, and her obsession with style, not to mention the put-downs her final hubby endured! In the last book she comes over as a bit shrewish. Money seems to answer a lot in this series. There is also a dubious theme that nice men, even if married can "visit ladies in Manchester" and still turn out to be the hero . In spite of some of these annoying niggles, a great family story, and now I am left wondering how William and his siblings got on. I felt sure that the little lad was going to die of Asthma and was so relieved when he was still alive on the last page! Would love a sequel, but am getting into the Irish sisters series where there is a link through runaway Mark. Easier to read than Cookson, I found, as she is prone to massively long portions of direct speech which I find detracts from the stories.
Time Trap (The Somerset Series Book 2)
Time Trap (The Somerset Series Book 2)
Christopher and Arianna's breathtaking romance continues in Time Trap, the worthy sequel to Time Twist.

Just when I believed all was settled between the hero and heroine, duty and honor forces Christopher to make one last trip into the past. His character is so noble, and yet his very nobility can be his blind spot. Which ... is my very favorite kind of male lead in a romance.

Arianna is understandably horrified when he is gone.

The villain from the first book is back and bad as ever, but the author gives us someone even more manipulative and horrible to love to hate in this sequel.

I loved the courage Arianna has a chance to show. I love the clever ways Christopher works to repair the past, even at great risk to himself. The love he has for Arianna is the stuff swoons are made of.

Jeanie Davis has such a way of creating palpable danger, and at the same time showing depth of concern between her characters, that I am quickly becoming a huge fan.

I can't wait to read book 3!
Clifford's Thanksgiving Visit
Clifford's Thanksgiving Visit
My 4 year old son and I enjoy books together and he already knows how to read pretty well at the age of four. We got this book because thanksigiving draws near but this book was not enjoyable at all. We like other Clifford books but this is not one of them. It's also ridiculous that Clifford's Mom who shows up in this story is a mini version of him and was able to fit on his nose. It's ridiculous how he pushes a train with people out of a tunnel just so that he can get out: "He couldn't turn around, so he pushed the train back to the station." That's quite reckless and rude. It's silly how he jumps on top of the high city buildings on his way to visit his mother. In the end, this thanksgiving story is really only showing one page that is actually about Thanksgiving where Clifford and his mini-sized mother eat dog food and a few heaps of a turkey. That's just not what I expect of a Thanksgiving story. It's a nice idea that Clifford wants to see his mother on Thanksgiving but the story line could have been a lot better and positive instead it was very disappointing. I am sending this back.
Fire-Tongue
Fire-Tongue
I read this after having burned through a number of other Sax Rohmer ebooks, and it wasn't my favorite at all; I much preferred his Fu Manchu novels.

The story is standard pulp fare -- detective, mysterious murder, dark secrets, enigmatic villain, beautiful ingenue, etc. So far, so good. Like other Rohmer books, there are some elements which presage the Indiana Jones movies (especially, here, Temple of Doom).

This particular pulp potboiler has several problems, though.

1) The writing is comically bad. The keynote might have been when the protagonist declares this the "biggest case of my career" when we have literally no idea who the villain might be, but there were many other sharp contenders (an honorable mention must go, for example, to "You are out after one of the big heads of the crook world").

2) the plotting is painfully predictable. When an elderly man visits the protagonist, announces he thinks people are trying to kill him, begs for assistance, and then decides to tell Our Hero about it all later that day, over dinner, instead of, you know, right then in his office like he came there to do. . .yeah. We all know about how long that guy's going to live (exactly long enough to choke out an Enigmatic Phrase over the soup). By itself, that kind of thing wouldn't be so bad, but, well, there's another problem:

3) The misogyny and racism. The best example of this work's misogyny might be this two-line exchange between the protagonist and the ingenue: ""Why do you insist on treating me like a child?"/"Perhaps because I enjoy doing so". The real kicker, though, is the books' casual racism; lines like "The manicurist incident indicated an inherent cruelty only possible in one of the Oriental race" are all too common, and whenever the heroes take an oath it's "on [their] honor as a white man," etc. On the one single occasion where a caucasian does something reprehensible, the narrator takes care to note "the prominence of upper jaw singularly reminiscent of the primitive Briton . . . utter stupidity and dogged courage are the outstanding characteristics of this type."

It's possible to defend that sort of thing by saying Rohmer was a creature of his era, but even at the time he was writing, Rohmer was decried for the rampant racism in his books; one of the later Fu Manchu novels, published shortly before WW2, features the protagonists attempting to save a Hitler analogue and thereby foil Fu Manchu's plot to prevent a world race war.

Regardless, though, for a modern reader, this kind of thing is fairly painful to read. In his Fu Manchu novels, it's worth working past the racism just to read the iconic descriptions of the Fu Manchu character. Here, though . . . well, there's no Fu Manchu here, and without that iconic character, what's left is just racist pulp. Skip this one, and grab the Fu Manchu series instead.
HARRY POTTER Official Licensed Character Wand Necklace Wand
HARRY POTTER Official Licensed Character Wand Necklace Wand
This product is displayed specifically in a "Ollivander's" gift box. I purchased this item for a friend's birthday and instead received it in a dinky clear plastic bag with a flimsy backing; the wand was even poking through the bag at a strange angle. I thought I was purchasing a quality replica wand-necklace; instead it looks like I purchased a low-rate bargain necklace from Claire's (or something to the like). When ordering this product, I saw no indication that it would not come with the displayed box. I'm rather disappointed about the presentation of the necklace and cannot even open the plastic packaging to inspect if the necklace is even made from quality metals (without further ruining the packaging––which I found to be crumpled and part of the top is even creased). One of the reasons I had bought this product was for the Ollivander's box; as it really made the gift something special rather than a mass-made product thats made rather obvious with the hook-hole at the top.
Silver Dream Racer
Silver Dream Racer
I liked this movie since I first saw it too many years ago. I had an old VHS copy that was in poor shape that I would watch whenever I needed a little cheese. You know, bad dialogue and questionable plot. I always liked the music and the racing wasn't bad, although much slower than the real thing. I knew there was another "european" ending and this DVD has it. I wish I had never seen it. The other ending takes a tolerable bit of entertainment and turns it into crap. I would guess that the makers didn't know how to end it so they did this.What a waste. Unfortunately both endings are here but you have to watch the european version as the American endind is just tacked on afterwards.
Half-Blood Academy 3: Magic Fury: an academy reverse harem fantasy romance
Half-Blood Academy 3: Magic Fury: an academy reverse harem fantasy romance
Excuse me while try to gather my thoughts... This one took an unexpected turn, and now I'm dying to find out where the story goes from here. How long until the next one? If it isn't coming out tomorrow then it's too far away for my nerves to handle. I try to be patient with my authors because I know that genius doesn't happen over night, but this wait just might kill me.

This isn't a story that can be read before reading the other books in the series, so please start with book 1, Magic Trials. I also recommend buying the entire series all at the same time so you won't have to wait to dive into the next one. Also, these stories might have the word "academy" in the title, but they aren't really for younger readers. There is a lot of hot, graphic action between Mari and her men. Please know what you are diving into before picking these up.

There were a lot of surprises in this one. People I thought could be trusted can't. People who I thought were pure evil might not be. Situations I thought I had figured out took a sharp left turn. Everything about this one was a surprise, other than the relationships between Marigold and her men (for the most part), and those between her and her friends. I'm still not totally sure who can be trusted, but I am fairly sure of who can't be. That's one of the things that keeps me coming back to Meg's books. She does a fantastic job at keeping me guessing as to what is truth and what is lies hidden in truths. I also love the way her characters are both so strong and so insecure at the same time. I saw a meme that sums up her stories completely. It said something like, "Knowing it could hurt and doing it anyway is brave. Also, knowing it could hurt and doing it anyway is stupid." This is what I think about when I'm inside Marigold's head. She is both brave and stupid, depending on the outcome of her actions. It makes her a believable and relate-able character. She is stubborn, headstrong, brave, loyal, and generous. She is also insecure, slow to forgive, and selfish. Shed wants to stand on her own feet and protect those around her, but she also is very afraid of being alone again. She is a handful, and might bring chaos wherever she goes, but she does it all with good intentions (mostly). It is a good thing that she has 4 mates because I don't think there is any one man, real or fictional, that could handle all of her many sides. And the more they try to protect her the more she will fight to escape. I can't always tell who is in the driver seat in their relationships.

My word of advice to anyone before jumping into this book is make sure you have a chunk of time set aside to read it. You won't want to put it down until you finish. It's action-packed, full of steamy, passionate mate time, and will leave you with your heart in your throat. Prepare for a massive book hangover, and indulge in some chocolate because Cookie/Rosebud/Lamb/Buttercup is about to take you on a wild ride.
Ching Ling Foo: America's First Chinese Superstar
Ching Ling Foo: America's First Chinese Superstar
Ching Ling Foo is an extraordinary figure in Chinese and Western history, travelling throughout America twice on long tours and to the UK, Europe, Canada and Australia more than one hundred years ago. What makes him special were his skills as a magician, his leadership capability over a troupe of Chinese artists and his business acumen. This was a time when a relatively small group of talented family members and artists from China could entertain the West with what was the best in the world at the time. Foo managed and profited from a theater program that could be described as a Cirque de Soleil from China. Ching Ling Foo also entertained local dignitaries and wealthy families as he travelled, hosting dinners and cooking Chinese cuisine with his travelling chefs. Foo had his challenges with unscrupulous business tour managers, venue owners, unions and the US immigration department, but he managed to overcome all obstacles.

Author Samuel Porteous has completed painstaking research on Foo’s two decades of touring, from the Omaha World Fair in 1898 which brought him to fame, to his final world tour which ended soon after WWI began. The book includes almost 200 illustrations from period publications and 856 footnotes that support this story of the acknowledged top magician in the world, and a good friend of Houdini. It was the time of vaudeville, and Foo included some vaudeville style acts in his show, along with his delightful daughter Chee Toy. At Foo’s peak, he was making US$2,500 a week, a sum unheard of at the time and three times the other top entertainers in the United States. This financial success and popularity led to frequent copying of Foo’s act by Westerners masquerading as Chinese magicians, using many of the same techniques and illusions. Ching Ling Foo challenged “Chung Ling Soo”, his most worthy imitator, to a battle of magic in London.

Foo also produced, directed and shot the first major documentary in China, at great risk. It focused on the Wuchang Uprising, which led to the downfall of the Qing dynasty. He included this film in his shows in China. We now rely on film and television as the primary way in which we learn about other countries, cultures and entertainers. It is interesting that Foo was an innovator in the new film media, and at the same time he was the world's best on tour. Foo and his entourage enjoyed life in the US, renting local Packards, dining out and going to other popular shows. Foo frequently toured alongside top western artists. Ching Ling Foo was truly "America's First Chinese Superstar", and this book is a great way to learn how Chinese relations with the West have flourished in the past.
AGPtek Baby Musical Mobile Plays Twelve Tunes
AGPtek Baby Musical Mobile Plays Twelve Tunes
Before i bought this product i read some of the reviews first, and i would say that it was kinda true about the sounds its too loud so i put a tape on half of the speaker so it will lessen the noise, i think it has 12 different songs and i was kinda disappointed because it was too short, i think it will only play 2-3 mins each of its songs, but what i love in this product is that you can hit play and stop button, if your baby is awake and wants to play you can just press the green button i think and if your baby is sleepin just hit the red button to stop, i have the manual mobile crib so for me to save money i just bought this product so i will never get tired of turning over and over again if it stops. Overall i like this product because it affordable and i would likely to recommend this product to all parents.
No Secrets
No Secrets
This is not to say that the cover of "No Secrets" isn't plenty interesting. There are certainly a couple items on it which are easy on a guy's eyes, like Carly's sensuous upper and lower lips, plus those millions of gorgeous teeth. But to loosely paraphrase the great Bo Diddley, it's what's inside that counts, and what's inside is superlative. Not one subpar track.

Let's begin with the big smash, "You're so Vain." When my grandchildren have grandchildren, they'll be still debating who this song was about in chat rooms, dorm rooms, and taverns across America (which I am confident will be greater then ever). You'd think after almost 40 years I'd be tired of this song, but it's held my interest as much as it did when it first was released, as much as it did on a frigid Chicago night in January, 1973, when all five Chicago rock stations played it -- simultaneously.

But there is far more to this album than the monster hit. "The Carter Family," which is not about our 39th President, tells the story about how one feels a great loss after someone who one takes for granted moves on. "His Friends are Always Fond of Robin" is a great song about unrequited love. There are many Carly Simon songs which move me almost to tears; this is one of them, and one which makes it difficult for me to continue driving safely when it's playing, so if you are in New Jersey, and see a charcoal 2011 BMW 535 pulled over to the side of the road, it's probably not because of engine trouble or being out of gas. Note that forty years ago I was less than fond of this cut. Things have changed, and it's not the song. Carly gets better and better when you put a few miles on your internal odometer.

Another track which elicits much the same reaction is "Embrace Me, You Child," which is about Carly's somewhat unrequited love for her father, Simon & Schuster co-founder Dick Simon, whom she never really got to come to terms with (he passed away much too young in 1960, when Carly was her mid-teens, and had been seriously ill for several years before that).

Then there is "Night Owl" on which Carly really rocks. So if some of the previous cuts make my heart heavy, I can and do use the hated-by-many BMW iDrive knob to switch to that cut, my spirits instantly brighten, and the hammer goes down.

"No Secrets" was Carly's best-selling album. I don't consider it quite her finest body of work (I am particularly fond of "Hello Big Man" and "Letters Never Sent"), but Sandy Koufax had three seasons in which he won 25 or more games, going 25-5 in 1963, 26-7 in 1965, and 27-8 in 1966, all with a team with no hitting to speak of. This is comparable to Koufax's 1963 season, the one where the Dodgers swept the Yankees and the Great Mickey Mantle in the World Series. Not too shabby.
The Invisible Vegan
The Invisible Vegan
I am, by birth, with no fault of my own, a white person. I have recently started a plant based diet and love watching any documentary promoting it. The Invisible Vegan was at the top of my list. I have only watched 5 minutes of it, so I cannot rate i unfavorable. I am sure it deserve five stars. In the first 5 minutes I was introduced to a group of young women making plant based foods, mocking it as white people foods, and also saying it couldn't be white people food because it was so tasty. “It’s too flavorful for white peoples foods”.

Watching so many documentaries lately about food, I have come to understand that poor people are the ones suffering in food deserts and are only given the option of fast food which will kill them in the long run. But none of the documentaries mock other people and their race.

The last documentary I watched was about people in Arkansas and Kentucly who were suffering the invisible horror of their diet, and they were both white and black. Poor little kids who were so obese with no guidance and support. It was heartbreaking. Soul food to me, just like the music, has been awesome and I never felt a negativity hearing the term. But Soul food, German food, Italian food, fast food, Irish food, Polish food, street food, may all be part of the problem. But they can all be made to enjoy healthy, especially vegan. If you are going to make a doc about African Americans on a plant based diet, please don't mock the white man or woman who don't look at the color of your skin. We are not all racist.
SRXWO Knee Pillow for Side Sleepers, Knee Cushion/Leg Pillows for Sleeping On Side with Memory Foam Wedge Contour, Pregnancy Knee Support Pillow
SRXWO Knee Pillow for Side Sleepers, Knee Cushion/Leg Pillows for Sleeping On Side with Memory Foam Wedge Contour, Pregnancy Knee Support Pillow
I bought this for my husband as he sleeps with a pillow between his knees, but this pillow didn't supply the level of comfort he got from a normal pillow. The issue is that this cushion goes between your thighs, rather than between your knees, so your legs don't feel fully supported. I also tried it out to check if my husband was just being fussy, but I also found it very uncomfortable. This issue isn't specific to this brand, as the cushion is of a high quality, but to the design of all of the cushions.

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