Esme James

Joined a year ago

Esme's Favorites
The Communist Manifesto
The Communist Manifesto
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx, Friedrich Engels, et al.. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 2628 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
2 Books! 1) The Notebook 2) At First Sight
2 Books! 1) The Notebook 2) At First Sight
2 Books! 1) The Notebook 2) At First Sight by Nicholas Sparks. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol.1): Leaves of Grass, Siddhartha, Middlemarch, The Jungle, Macbeth, Moby-Dick, A Study in Scarlet, ... The Way We Live Now, Sister Carrie...
180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol.1): Leaves of Grass, Siddhartha, Middlemarch, The Jungle, Macbeth, Moby-Dick, A Study in Scarlet, ... The Way We Live Now, Sister Carrie...
180 Masterpieces You Should Read Before You Die (Vol.1): Leaves of Grass, Siddhartha, Middlemarch, The Jungle, Macbeth, Moby-Dick, A Study in Scarlet, ... The Way We Live Now, Sister Carrie... by Walt Whitman, George Eliot, et al.. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
PHP: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners
PHP: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners
PHP: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners by MG Martin. Rated 3.7 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Essential PHP for Web Professionals
Essential PHP for Web Professionals
Essential PHP for Web Professionals by Christopher Cosentino. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 7 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Investors and Managers
The Essays of Warren Buffett: Lessons for Investors and Managers
I enjoyed this book. Warren Buffett stands for something far greater than himself or the wealth he has generated. He is in what he does rather countercyclical, rather old fashioned, and fabulously good.

These essays introduce us to Buffett's way of thinking and doing business. There's a lot to learn from both aspects. Some of the book is rather technical, but most is straightforward enough, and I found many places where he made me think. I think our world at many levels- individual, corporate, government would be better if we adopted many of Buffett's ideas.

Buffett is an example of thinking from the ultimate to the proximate. He makes decisions for the long term, based on value. He cannot be bothered chasing the ups and downs of the market. It's like trying to stand still on a rolling wave. Prices go up, prices come down, the long investor treats them both the same and focuses way beyond the short term. Buffett is interested in the fundamental value of a business- does it provide worthwhile goods and services? Does it do it well? Is it well led and well managed? Is this likely to continue through time? Can he understand the value that the business offers to its customers and shareholders? If he can then he's likely to invest. In this he's exemplifying the principles of The Three Rules: How Exceptional Companies Think, and revenue before cost. It's not that he doesn't see cost- it's that he puts cost within the context of value, and more especially the context of value over time.

He's scathing about short term speculation, complex financial instruments, short term thinking, responding to mood. His comments about buying cheaply are sharp. Something may well be cheap for a reason- and trying to make it better will likely be a losing struggle. If something is unintelligible it's probably concealing a lie, and an untrustworthy person behind it. If a manager is promising that they will make the numbers, sooner or later they will be tempted up the numbers. We live in a short term appearance world and pathologies such as probophilia (as described in Between Health and Illness: Explorations in and around medicineafflict too many institutions.

Buffett is an example of a man who knows what he is doing, why he is doing it, and what outcome he wants. He's a straightforward, honest guide to the benefits of thinking long term, and to the benefits of thinking about what value is and where it is to be found. He challenges the modern world with its immediacy, its distractions, its fads, its madnesses of crowds. He takes us back to a much slower paced world, and we'd be better if we learned from him. He teaches us to look for true value and the long term.

There's much in this book about good personal and corporate governance, about discernment and about living life well. Readers will learn a lot from Buffett's patterns of thought and action.
What Would Steve Jobs Do? How the Steve Jobs Way Can Inspire Anyone to Think Differently and Win
What Would Steve Jobs Do? How the Steve Jobs Way Can Inspire Anyone to Think Differently and Win
I recently read this book and What Would Drucker Do Now?, written by Rick Wartzman and also published by McGraw-Hill. Initially, I suspected that both were (or will become) part of a "What Would X Do?" series that might also include Sun Tzu, Socrates, Machiavelli, and Von Clauswitz or, within the domain of business, Henry Ford, Albert Sloan, one or both of the Thomas Watsons, and Walt Disney. It turns out, the two "What Would" books share little in common, except for the quality of their content and of their authors' presentation of it.

Peter Sander devotes the first two chapters of his book to essential background information about Steve Jobs and Apple, then explores the meaning and significance of the book's title in several different ways. Here are two. First, what he characterizes as "The Steve Jobs Leadership Model" in Chapter 3, one that consists of six "steps" or elements. He also includes a suggestion by Jean-Louis Gassée, former Apple VP: "Democracies don't make great products - you need a competent tyrant." Jobs was certainly both and that is hardly a head-snapping revelation. The historical details of the model have been known for decades. The same competent tyrant who visited Xerox PARC with Steve Wozniak in 1979 also introduced a series of "insanely great" Apple products 25-30 years later. For better or worse, Jobs really was literally "one of a kind."

Hence the importance of Sander's second approach: A series of "What Would Steve Jobs Do?" sections at the conclusion of Chapters 4-9 in which he suggests lessons to be learned from Jobs in six subject areas: Customer (Page 103), Vision (124-125), Culture (153-154), Product (171-172), Message (190-191), and Brand (205-206). Almost anyone who reads this book can follow the advice provided (e.g. "Thank about customer pain and what causes it") but few - if any - can do so in ways and to the extent Steve Jobs could...and did. Most of the admonitions will serve as reminders rather than as revelations. Fair enough.

For those who wish to know more about Steve Jobs, there is no shortage of other sources, notably Walter Isaacson's biography. I also highly recommend Adam Lashinsky's Inside Apple and Leander Kahney's Inside Steve's Brain.
Moonshots: Creating a World of Abundance
Moonshots: Creating a World of Abundance
Okay--I'm going to start by saying that this book makes me a bit angry.

And it's not for the reasons you may think: it's because this is SUCH an important book, and it's not being taught to the masses, and heralded in schools (well, of COURSE not, as they are as Jain puts it, 'too invested in the status quo' to have a book as innovative as this in their system).

This book is literally having a billionaire/genius/philanthropist in your ear, letting you know where the world is going, how to capitalize on that and how we can ALL make this a better place for humanity.

It tells you what the future looks like. It's like the Wayne Gretzky quote about skating to where the puck will be...yet the rest of mankind is happy going through life in a trance, content with incremental changes...without knowing about the tsunami of massive change that is already happening all around us.

As impressive as this book is in telling us what will happen and how life will change, the most important aspect of the book is that the reader gets a glimpse into HOW the mind of Naveen Jain works. He is, without a doubt, the most optimistic, positive, possibility-oriented person I've ever experienced--

And this book is like a roadmap to that mind.

It lets us know not what to think, but the possibilities of HOW to think.

It's amazing, it's groundbreaking, and as dense as society is right now, I don't think the brilliance of this book will be discovered until many years later. It's almost too much to handle, as the folks in mainstream media, more concerned with who is marrying who, and what somebody said about someone else can't get their collective minds around such important ideas.

Thank you, Naveen for writing such an important book.

P.S. The picture is an example of how I've marked up and highlighted this book. It's amazing. It's the textbook to the future.

P.P.S. I got the Audible and hardback versions, so I can listen, then go back and take notes. It's that impactful.
The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford
The Making of Black Detroit in the Age of Henry Ford
The Making of Black Detroit is a wonderful book, even if the title is somewhat misleading. Beth Tompkins Bates examines the relationship between automaker Henry Ford and the African American in the years between the two World Wars. By the end of World War I, the Ford Motor Company had become a beacon for black migrants. Whatever his motives, Ford chose to open up jobs to black workers even when his competitors would not. Bates then carefully demonstrates how the relationship changed over time: how black workers moved from a position of loyalty (feigned or real) to a position of assertively standing up to Ford by working to bring the United Autoworkers into Ford's plants; Ford was vehemently anti-union and apparently counted on the presence of loyal black workers to keep the union out. Bates' work, however, suffers from some of the flaws of many academic texts: repetitive writing, jargon and an overuse of acronyms. And the title: Several monographs written in the last 30 years or so have described the "making" of Black Detroit (most notably Richard Thomas' Life for Us Is What We Make It), but Bates really doesn't address the development of the African American community. Her work more accurately could be titled African Americans and the Shadow of Henry Ford. This work, however, still will be of interest to those students of African American history, urban history and labor history.
New Morning
New Morning
Following on from June 1970's self-indulgent and often derided "Self Portrait" double album (funnily enough hindsight has many loving it to pieces) - critics and the public alike went nuts for the supposed 'return to form' of October's "New Morning". The British pummelled it into the No. 1 slot when it was issued slightly later in November of 1970 - and no self-respecting Bob Dylan "Greatest Hits" or "Anthology" is complete without "If Not For You".

Some have even said that "New Morning" is as good as 1975's meisterwork "Blood On The Tracks" - which in my mind is stretching credulity and the obvious audio truth way past its limit. "New Morning" is a solid Dylan album only with some moments of greatness. And re-listening to it in 2017 on this fabulous Remaster hasn't changed my opinion on that. Here are the Winterludes...

UK released May 2009 - "New Morning" by BOB DYLAN on Columbia 88697347002 (Barcode 886973470022) is a straightforward CD Remaster of the 12-track 1970 album and plays out as follows (35:50 minutes):

1. If Not For You
2. Day Of The Locusts
3. Time Passes Slowly
4. Went To See The Gypsy
5. Winterlude
6. If The Dogs Run Free
7. New Morning [Side 2]
8. Sign On The Window
9. One More Weekend
10. The Man In Me
11. Three Angels
12. Father Of Night
Tracks 1 to 12 are the album "New Morning" - released 21 October 1970 in the USA on Columbia KC 30290 and November 1970 in the UK on CBS Records S 69001. Produced by BOB JOHNSTON - it peaked at No. 7 in the USA and No. 1 in the UK.

Given that the original single-sleeve LP was so staggeringly boring to look at - the new 8-page inlay comes as a blessed relief. It's made up mostly of in-studio photos - Bob at the microphones - reading lyric sheets - the boys in the band discussing what to do next with Producer Bob Johnston. Al Kooper plays Keyboards, Guitar and French Horn - David Bromberg plays Electric Guitar and Dobro - Buzzy Feiten plays Electric Guitar - Russ Kunkel is on Drums with Maeretha Stewart guesting on "If Dogs Run Free" on Background Vocals. There's no new liner notes per say.

But at least we get that stunning GREG CALBI Remaster - a man whose had his mitts on McCartney's "Band On The Run", Paul Simon's "Graceland", Supertramp's "Crime Of The Century" and "Breakfast In America" and even John Mayer's Remastered catalogue. Calbi has turned in another winner - these Dylan remasters are all jobs well done it has to be said.

The photograph on the rear cover is a youthful Bob in early 1962 with one of his Blues heroes – the barnstorming big-lunged Victoria Spivey – famous for misery raunchy tunes like "Furniture Man Blues" and troublesome fools like "Dope Head Blues" (see my review for the 20CD Box Set "Roots & Blues"). Though in hindsight – it's an odd photo to feature here with precious little on the album resembling Blues Music except maybe some of "One More Weekend". Word has it that the "New Morning" project was going to be another double set – a sort of Part 2 to "Self Portrait" combining covers that moved him in his youth with new material (some of those outtakes have turned up on the "Bootleg Series" of CD reissues) - but perhaps because of the backlash to "Self Portrait" that idea was paired down to the single LP we now have made up entirely of BD originals.

The album opens with "If Not For You" – a hooky-as-Hell love song Beatle George Harrison had debuted to the world only weeks earlier on his 3LP Box Set "All Things Must Pass" on Apple Records (the opening song). People love this song to Dylan's wife of the time - perhaps because that weird organ sound Al Kooper gets harks back to his 60ts sound on "Highway 61 Revisited" and that thinny Harmonica back even further to "Freewheelin' Bob Dylan". And despite it’s rather slight feel BD sings - "...without your love I'd be nowhere at all..." and you can't help but think he actually means it this time (Olivia Newton John would lodge her first chart hit in February 1971 with "If Not For You" on Uni Records – No. 25 USA). "Day Of The Locust" feels like a great Bob Dylan song - while "Time Passes Slowly" was reputedly amongst the first three tunes recorded for an abandoned musical version of "The Devil And Daniel Webster" called "Scratch" (the other two were "New Morning" and "Father Of Night"). I have a very sweet cover of "Winterlude" by England's Steve Gibbons which he did for his 1998 CD "Bob Dylan Project" – Gibbons doesn't change its strangely casual nature and "...this dude thinks you're grand..." lyrics. We go early-morning smoky barroom Jazz for the spoken "If Dogs Run Free" that features scat vocals from Maeretha Stewart. As he'd veered away from 'Bob Dylan' – fans naturally went nuts and slagged off the song as derisory and all things unholy – but I've always thought it kind of brill. One man's heaven is...

Side 2 opens with the very Van Morrison sound of "New Morning" – acoustic guitars and lingering organ – marital bliss clearly keeping him happy (skies of blue – so happy just to see you smile). The album’s other biggie for me is "Sign On The Window" – a ballad with lyrics that I still can’t figure out – three’s a crowd – down on Mean Street – a cabin in Utah – catch rainbow trout. Whatever you read into the forlorn sad words – I love his piano playing while the band plays catch up and that impassioned vocal is the strongest on the whole record. "One More Weekend" is a slippin' and slidin' Bluesy trollop of a song – the band finally sounding like a cohesive unit as they boogie in that Bob Dylan way (great Remaster). Some people enjoy "The Man In Me" but those girly vocals feel forced to me - I much prefer the simpler almost Gospel spoken song "Three Angels" with its 'concrete world full of souls'. The album finishes on the piano and voices rumble of "Father Of Night" - a sound Cat Stevens would tap on his "Foreigner" album in 1973. The one-and-half-minute song is also an indication of his emerging beliefs - gorgeous audio as he sings of "...father of air and father of trees...that grows in our hearts and our memories..."

Good - great - ordinary - different - the same – I love it – I don’t love it - it's Bob Dylan. Even now his enigma eludes me...and would we have it any other way...
The Complete Album Collection Vol. One
The Complete Album Collection Vol. One
I started buying Bob Dylan CDs in the early 2000s and very quickly collected every album in his catalog available at the time. Once you get into Dylan, you feel compelled to hear everything he ever did, so this boxed set is a great option for new fans. But what about those of us who already own a handful or even all of the CD masters or remasters released previously? Is this set worth buying? Is it a needed upgrade? Well, for the most part YES, but let me give you some details.

15 albums in this 42 album set were newly remastered for The Complete Album Collection in 2013. IMPORTANT: These newest remasters were done to Dylan's 1970s, 80s, and 90s releases, albums like Self Portrait, the previously unreleased Dylan 1973, Hard Rain, Street-Legal, Bob Dylan At Budokan, Saved, Empire Burlesque, Good As I Been To You and others. The classic 1960s albums ARE NOT newly remastered and all use the previous 2003 or 2005 remasters that most of us already own. So, the good news is that you aren't missing out on some amazing, true-vinyl-mix of John Wesley Harding or anything like that if you don't buy this boxed set. If you are a casual fan, just stick with your mid-2000s copies of Blonde on Blonde and Highway 61, there's no need to get this set unless you want to complete your Dylan discography (which I highly recommend). But if you already own all the mid-2000s remasters and older CD masters of the 1970s-90s material like I do, then you will be looking at the 2013 remasters to make up a lot of value.

My experience with the 2013 remasters has been mostly positive; however, I will offer some minor caveats for those who are on the fence or are worried about the $200 price tag. The good news is that there are some really great 2013 remasters included here. I also finished buying my Dylan collection before the 2009 remasters of Before the Flood, New Morning, The Basement Tapes, and Dylan & The Dead, so I will count those towards my list of new upgrades with this set (these all sound great). As for the 2013 remasters, Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid and Self Portrait really do sound more dynamic than the old original CD masters. "Knockin' on Heaven's Door" and "Alberta #1" have never come through my system with such presence or clarity. The 1976 live album Hard Rain really does sound significantly better, with Dylan's vocals pulled out from the muddy mix of instruments that they were buried in before. Some of the distortion remains on his louder vocals, but this could be left over from the original recording. Street-Legal actually uses the original mix of the LP (the CD apparently used an alternate mix all along), but I can't really say if it is superior to the older CD issue.

I guess the only negative criticism I could offer is that albums like Saved and the remastered mid-1980s to early 1990s releases don't really sound that much better than my old CD issues. I do hear some slight improvements to the overall dynamics or separation of instruments in these albums when comparing tracks in iTunes on my Bose speakers, but if you pressed me, I would have to admit that their remastering was perhaps not a necessary upgrade. But they are a welcomed one nonetheless!

For audiophiles who are worried about brick-walling, the Loudness War, or drastic changes to the original sound of Dylan's LPs, you have nothing to fear. I know that some people have had issues with over-driven distortion or "bad sound" from the special edition Harmonica USB files, but I haven't come across anything like that on the CDs. All of these albums show at least an 11 or 12 rating on the Dynamic Rage Database scale, which is quite good.

Even though I already owned these albums, I feel that the 2013 remasters are good enough to warrant a re-purchase of the whole catalog. I also neglected to get Dylan's four latest albums, so it was nice to round out my collection (even though the Christmas album is pretty cringy). Let me know if you have any questions!
OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 11 Developer Complete Study Guide: Exam 1Z0-815, Exam 1Z0-816, and Exam 1Z0-817
OCP Oracle Certified Professional Java SE 11 Developer Complete Study Guide: Exam 1Z0-815, Exam 1Z0-816, and Exam 1Z0-817
This is a very large book, coming in at 1200 pages, but that is because it is the author's 815 and 816/817 books combined. The authors highlighted how to use the book to study for the 815, 816 or 817 exams, so it is easy to use, but if it's too much for you, they are also sold separately.

I'm not finished with the book yet, but I like what I read so far. I started by looking at the security chapter. I really liked that Hacker Harry and Security Sienna characters were used to teach security. It made what could have been a dry chapter a lot more fun.

If you are taking a Java certification, I highly recommend this combined book or the two separate ones.
AutoFocus Full HD Webcam 1080P with Privacy Shutter - Pro Web Camera with Dual Digital Microphone - USB Computer Camera for PC Laptop Desktop Mac Video Calling, Conferencing Skype YouTube
AutoFocus Full HD Webcam 1080P with Privacy Shutter - Pro Web Camera with Dual Digital Microphone - USB Computer Camera for PC Laptop Desktop Mac Video Calling, Conferencing Skype YouTube
Like a whole lotta people these days I found myself in quarantine with a need for a web cam. My HP laptop was equipped but I PREFERRED (didn't NEED) something better. This cam had the specs I want at an agreeable price. The ESTIMATED delivery time was a little disappointing, but I decided to take a chance. First, the delivery time changed - for the better - TWICE after I placed the order. It was finally SCHEDULED to deliver...tomorrow. So it still arrived a day early! So full marks to the folks at Amazon for that!

The first thing I tried out of the box was to thread, ever-so-gently, the included tripod onto the camera. That was a no-go. As noted in several other reviews the threads are just not a good match. I tried using a proper 35mm camera tripod and it would not thread on either. This isn't important for me because the camera is where it will be, on top of my monitor.

The adapter/brace/arm thingy, whatEVER, does a very nice job of keeping it on the top ledge of the monitor. It isn't heavy enough to even consider things like scratching the monitor and it is rubber lined anyway. So, mounting - very good. The camera is light and it is 'held' on the monitor by GRAVITY. So keeping this in mind, it's not going anywhere under normal use. It MAY get brushed off the monitor if someone is dusting carelessly around it.

The camera is in a ball and socket mount. It moves easily, but not so easily that it will 'flop' around. If it's not level (or the monitor isn't) it's easy to adjust the camera in it's mount slightly to get it "right". This also applies to centering the subject (you most likely) in the middle of the frame.

I plugged it into a USB port and fired up the WinX Camera app. I saw the camera light up and the next thing I saw was me - on screen. There ARE focus and brightness adjustments under advanced settings but neither was necessary. I had three desk lamps and overhead lighting on and I was very well lit.

I tried snapping a still of myself and it did a very nice job @ 1920 x 1080.

It arrived just in time for a WebEx video teleconference and when I joined, there I was. It used it's own internal mic to pick up my voice and used my Soundsticks to play audio from other meeting participants. IE, it worked right the first time with no settings or tinkering. It is truly plug and play. The sliding lens cover was an important (for me) included option and it works like the camera - as it should and easily.

I have no reasons for any criticisms - on day 1. I would recommend both the camera and vendor highly.
Ulysses' Gaze
Ulysses' Gaze
...and you'll be rewarded. Several of the reviewers below expressed problems with the pacing of this film -- one even went so far as to charge that Angelopoulos has created a 'pale imitation' of a Tarkovsky film with his long shots &c. While I could definitely see some parallels with Tarkovsky's work (the aforementioned long shots; the interplay between past & present, dream & reality; the non-linear progression of the story), I would hardly denigrate the director's efforts as a 'pale imitation'. I won't doubt for a moment that Angelopoulos admires and has been inspired by Tarkovsky's work -- but this is a director with his own vision, not one he has derived from the creativity of another artist.

The cinematography is breathtakingly stunning throughout -- and the long shots with which some viewers evidently find fault are in my opinion perfectly in tune with the flow and rhythm of the film. Too many people get used to the choppy, hurry-up-and-get-to-the-point techniques of Hollywood -- when something deeper, with more of an artistic foundation comes along, they have trouble relating to it. There are subtleties at work here -- masterful brushstrokes on film -- that must be taken in with an open, attentive mind. The small and the large combine into the cohesive whole that is this film -- sit back and let them do their work, don't try to guess where the film is going next or wonder how it's going to arrive there.

Keitel offers up a marvelously natural performance -- a review I read nailed it in part when it mentioned that Keitel doesn't so much 'deliver' his lines as become a vehicle for them. I got the feeling throughout the film that he was drawing his performance from a place very deep within himself, giving himself to it completely, allowing Angelopoulos' vision to animate his work. As a result, he is completely believable in his role as the exiled Greek filmmaker simply identified in the credits as 'A'.

Eleni Karaindrou's soundtrack (and the work of the great violist Kim Kashkashian in particular) complements the film perfectly. She has worked with Angelopoulos in the past, and continues to do so -- her music stands well on its own merit.

Not having seen this on the theatrical screen, I can't speak to the quality of the transfer -- and I must admit to having been disappointed by Fox-Lorber DVDs in the past -- but I thought the colour-drained look of many scenes in the film was perfect. Angelopoulos has stated that he 'feels' a film with all of his senses -- that translates into the exprience of viewing it as well...at least for me.

Highly recommended.
Venom
Venom
Movie critics have a though job, I get it. They have to watch lots of movies and not for pleasure, but as a job. They can't just relax and have fun, they need to sit down and analyze every bit of a movie: script, acting, effects, lighting, music, dialogue, etc. They also have to compare with films of different genres and with the actors and directors previous efforts. There's a lot of work and baggage, and it's understandable when they demand more from a film. On the other hand, this process means they simply don't see films the way the general public does, and this disconnect sometimes means they'll be harsher on a film than they need to be. Sometimes this will be out of handling different expectations, and sometimes, being human as they still are, it'll be out of pure unfairness.

In the case of Venom, it seems to be a combination of both. The film seems to be almost universally reviled by critics while almost universally loved by audiences. While being completely fair I'll admit many of the complaints about this movie are completely legitimate, I still believe the treatment is receiving by critics is still preposterously exaggerated. I've ranted about this before, but it seems critics have simply grown accustomed to the Marvel Cinematic Universe's formula, and anything that strays from it in any direction is automatically judged harsher, whether it deserves it or not. And Venom absolutely doesn't. Yes, it's campy. Yes, it doesn't take itself too seriously. Yes, it doesn't have any messages and it doesn't deal with any current socio-political issues. What does Venom offer in place of all that? Simple, primal and unbridled FUN.

Venom is the story of Eddie Brock, a reporter who believes in doing the right thing, even by using unconventional methods, and even if it means telling the truth about powerful people. Is because of this that he decides to investigate on a rich industrialist who's secretly kidnapping people and experimenting on them. This gets him in serious trouble, and having no good deed going unpunished, he loses his job, girlfriend and apartment. But when a scientist grows a conscience and tells Brock about the secret experiments the industrialist is doing by merging humans with parasitical sentient goo life form known as "symbiotes", he decides to pay a visit and inadvertently becomes host for one of these creatures. Hilarity ensues.

The symbiote merging with Eddie calls himself "Venom". It's an intelligent creature that needs to feed and has less scruples about killing than Eddie does. With Eddie they form a symbiosis: the alien will augment Eddie's strength, agility and resilience while Eddie provides the alien with sustenance until he can find his companions. Having no choice, since he's being followed by people who want him dead, Eddie complies, but now finds himself bond to a creature that could cause the deaths of millions. Meanwhile, another symbiote named "Riot" is traveling the planet in search for the rest, and he has even less respect for other forms of life. Will Eddie be able to control Venom or convince him to join his side or will Venom and Riot unite against humanity?

Here's why Venom resonates so much with audiences: the story is simple to follow, the main characters are likable and, unlike other films in recent years, it doesn't try to beat messages into the audience's heads. Expect no attempts at political agendas or social issues; every bit of dialogue is in service of the story or the characters. But the main reason is that both main characters are just really fun to watch. Eddie and Venom form basically a buddy cop movie, with two different personalities clashing and being forced to work together.

They're also bloody hilarious. I complain a lot about movies in the MCU using humor as an excuse for plot development, having every character being a snide wise-cracker and ruining legitimately tense moments for the sake of a joke, but this one doesn't fall into those pits. The humor is relegated to Eddie and Venom's relationship, so not all characters feel the same, and tense moments are not punctuated by jokes, so the tension isn't lost.

Yes, I'll say that there are a bunch of plot holes and perhaps the story is too overly simplistic for those who expect something more, but if you're willing to just relax and have fun, this movie does the job very well.

How does it work as an adaptation? People complained a lot about the movie not being R-Rated and Spider-Man not forming part of the origin story, an I say that those people simply have no idea what they're talking about. Venom has always been goofy in the comics, this isn't a new development, and Spider-Man's involvement is unnecessary, since the character is strong enough to thrive on its own. Yes, having Venom show up in a Spider-Man movie would be benefitial... for Spider-Man's character. But Venom can perfectly work on its own without Spidey. That being said, I would very much like to see the characters clash in the future. We'll have to see, since it's still not clear if Venom and Spider-Man even exist in the same universe yet.

Bottom-line: if you're expecting elaborate plots, social messages and/or a serious tone this is the wrong place. But if all you want is fun, Venom will do the job perfectly.
Warcraft
Warcraft
Not ever having played the game I had zero " gamer bias" to contend with...so I count myself lucky there. As a huge fan of the Sword & Sorcery genre I don't have any reservations recommending this movie to any lover of the genre. Of course if you are a huge J.R.R. Tolkien fan the characters called Orc's may bother you a bit , but I doubt it because anyone that is truly a fan of the Sword & Sorcery genre has come to realize the name & characters of " Orc's" have saturated the genre & these particular Orc's are extremely awesome in both appearance & as a sympathetic warrior race driven from their home planet & deceived by a malevolent Warlord who is bending the entire race to his will with a terrible dark magic. I don't want to give away to many spoilers for those that haven't seen the movie & are as ignorant of the game as I am. That brings up another point you certainly don't need to be a fan of the game to enjoy this highly fast paced Sword & Sorcery action adventure!!! It is visually stunning with awesome fight scene's including good use of magic as a weapon & for defense. This is no B-rate low budget film to bulk up the genre but a top notch Sword & Sorcery flick worthy of any collection!!! It was so fast paced I had to watch it twice once when everyone was awake & again later when I was alone to fully take in all the beautiful cinematography, great fight scenes & fun fantasy escapist storyline. Yes there is a lot going on in this very fast paced thrill ride of a movie & so much to see its worth owning because you will probably see something new every time you are ready to watch it again. I think the acting was great especially when you factor in that a lot of the acting is done against green screen with nothing to act off of. Gamer or not this is a great addition to any movie library!!!
The Train Boy
The Train Boy
This was another one of Horatio Alger's stories. ItI just found. was fun reading another one of Alger's stories that
Susan Lewis Bundle: Missing/ The Mill House
Susan Lewis Bundle: Missing/ The Mill House
I bought this bundle having read Never Let Me Go which i really enjoyed. It seems that Susan Lewis has improved a lot since these were written. I found missing to be really lame. It had the potential to become a really good story had she incorporated the missing child into the story. As it stood it was dull. I kept waiting for it to take off but just as i thought it might, it ended. I didnt realise it was a short story. Am just reading themillhouse and will persevere with it but not sure how good it will be.
The Case of the Drowsy Mosquito
The Case of the Drowsy Mosquito
Brilliant. I have been slowly going through the Perry Mason novels. Whilst they are always fascinating and well written, these two novels in one paperback are particularly intriguing. In neither does Perry Mason go through the usual court scenes. Both are written during WW2 and in them we see Perry and Della working more as detectives than as a lawyer and his secretary. We also see more of the relationship between them. The stories also show something more of the relationship between Mason and Tragg, the LAPD lieutenant. The actual book was printed in 1976 and was formerly the property of a library. In good condition with period advertisements.
Dragon Ball (VIZBIG Edition), Vol. 2: Strongest Under the Heavens (2)
Dragon Ball (VIZBIG Edition), Vol. 2: Strongest Under the Heavens (2)
I will openly admit, I'm the hugest Manga fan. There is tons that I grew up with as a kid (Ghost in the Shell, Ranma 1/2, Gunsmith Cats, etc.) that I enjoyed, but the standard fare of today (DragonBall Z, Naruto, Bleach, One Piece) does not generally appeal to me. However my kids have always eaten that stuff up.

THAT SAID, my youngest, 10, is now just getting into manga, and is always looking out for stuff to read. I knew DragonBall Z has been popular and enduring, and generally understood it to be okay for kids, so we bought him the first volume of the original DragonBall (this series) at the bookstore one day. He read it for a short period and came out of his room declaring that it was not appropriate. :) I read the book to see what was in it, and indeed there was a heavy emphasis on humor about pervy old men, and men/boys that are obsessed with panties. Probably in Japan, at the time, this was normal acceptable humor, but in 2017 United States, it's definitely questionable. Short story long, I did enjoy the book and read through the whole volume 1.

Which brings me to this book - I enjoyed the first book enough to purchase this one on Amazon. However I was disappointed with where the story went (or didn't go, really). The first book was a great adventure where they traveled all over on a quest looking for Dragonballs having many different encounters. This book had way more emphasis on fighting. I guess that is a popular genre in manga, but I found it to be tedious!!! More than half of this book is dedicated to just the the tournament. It gets very decompressed to the point where one fight takes place over the course of, I don't know, maybe 8 chapters. I think there are single punches or kicks that might take a couple chapters to complete!!! (possible exaggeration on that last one). So, it just wasn't for me.

After the tournament it picks up a bit, but then they found another excuse to drag more fights on for several chapters. Ended up being a chore to get through the end, which was totally not the case with the first book. By the time I was done, I decided not go on to vol. 3 since I think this is pretty much the direction that this book is going in.
Roald Dahl's Colours
Roald Dahl's Colours
Lovely book. Bright colours, lovely pictures. 2 year old granddaughter loves it.
Samurai 8: The Tale of Hachimaru, Vol. 1 (1)
Samurai 8: The Tale of Hachimaru, Vol. 1 (1)
The legendary author/artist returns for perhaps another great series? Samurai 8!

This is the first volume of many.... I'm not sure how long he plans to make this but hopefully long enough.

The beginning is pretty slow honestly, but when the action and plot kicks in man it gets lit 🔥🔥🔥

If this does good hopefully it will get an anime adaptation later on the road... I mean children of wales (great manga series btw) got one and that isn't as hardly popular as this, so no doubt it will get one maybe after he is 100 chapters deep.

I honestly don't buy much manga, only children of whales and boruto is what Im collecting the rest I read online, but I figured I wanted to jump into this new series to support my boy kishi becuase naruto holds a special place for me so hopefully this one will too.

Highly recommended buying it. Of course I am also still supporting the boruto manga and anime as well as that is ongoing still.
Naruto, Vol. 51: Sasuke vs. Danzo!
Naruto, Vol. 51: Sasuke vs. Danzo!
Here are the chapters included in Volume 51:

474 A Hokage's Decision...!!
475 Madera's True Worth!!
476 Sasuke vs. Danzo...!!
477 Do Not Speak of Itachi!!
478 Sasuke's Susano'o!!
479 The Izanagi
480 Sacrifice
481 The Death of Danzo!!
482 Just One More Time...
483 Master and Student Reunited!!

After months of waiting for the newest Naruto manga, it's finally here!

In the last volume (50), Sai had just returned to tell Naruto, Kakashi, and Yamato THE TRUTH behind Sakura's recent visit--and what she had been unable to say: that Naruto's old comrades were planning to "off" Sasuke, themselves. Sasuke had simply become too much of a liability, and his actions were starting to have repercussions on the relationship between Konoha (their home village, called The Village Hidden in the Leaves in the Naruto anime), and the rest of the ninja world. It's a situation that will soon come to war, if left unchecked.

As Naruto mulls over this news in silence, Gara, Tamari, and Kankuro show up with news of their own. They explain what happened at the Hokage summit--and who has been named Hokage of Konoha.

Meanwhile, in another place, Madara Uchiha facilitates the battle between Sasuke and Danzo. Madara knows the depth of Sasuke's hate for Danzo because of what the man did to Sasuke's brother, and Madara is eager to test Sasuke's abilities. During this battle, Danzo reveals an extremely powerful secret weapon--a forbidden jutsu that we've never glimpsed, before now--and boy, is it a doozie! But it takes a terrible toll on its user. So as the battle between Sasuke and Danzo rages on, we're left wondering if Danzo will be able to overcome Sasuke before his jutsu takes its final toll. And as we see Sasuke sacrifice one who is loyal and committed to him, we must wonder if Sasuke has gone too far down the path of vengeance to ever come home.

As we reach the end of volume 51, we see first-hand how far Sasuke has truly fallen. Kakashi and Sasuke face off, each ready to kill the other. And as Sasuke stands with a wild look in his eyes and hate in his heart, Kakashi realizes that this scene is much like that of the Third Hokage standing against his own student, Orochimaru--in a battle that left both student and teacher destroyed.

I've been reading along, expecting to learn that Sasuke's fall toward evil was only a front--and that he actually had a much nobler plan beneath it all. But at this point, it appears that Sasuke really IS as evil as his actions seem to indicate. But Masashi Kishimoto has a special skill with plot reversals, so there's still hope. Not to mention, it would be a huge disappointment for Sasuke's fate to be revealed in black and white--once and for all, with no hope of salvation. This is not the path of greater conflict--and conflict is what creates interesting story. So...I'm biding my time until volume 52 comes out in September, and hoping for "the best".

Volume 51 is hard-hitting and full of action. It definitely does not disappoint!
The Possession (The Anomaly Files Book 2)
The Possession (The Anomaly Files Book 2)
I'm not sure what to say about this book. It's an odd story to say the least.

It starts off very slow with the four characters from The Anomaly Files looking into odd walls that have existed for decades around a town in Northern California. The setup is interesting enough to google the facts that are being presented about similar walls existing around the world. Nolan's (the on screen talent of the Anomaly Files) ex-wife Kristy, a journalist, is also in the same town looking into a missing teenager.

The story jumps between the walls being documented/researched and the possible abduction of the teenager. It's a slow setup and about 1/3 of the book the teenager comes back from the "abduction". It now becomes about the teenager and witchcraft, attempting to tie in why the walls exist. With dream-like sequences and jumps between characters stories, the book becomes a jumbled mess that is hard to follow or even care about.

The author (Rutger / Smith...whoever) shoehorned the characters from the first book in the series (?) into a this confusing story that eventually becomes about guilt from the characters past.

It honestly took me two weeks of reading other books in between to finish the last 50 pages. This was the one book this summer that I was looking forward to and it ended up being very disappointing. If there are more books in this series to be published I'll be waiting for other reviews before purchasing. No more preorders for this author.

I was looking for an adventure story, but got a Lifetime/Syfy original instead.
Jede Menge Quatsch-Geschichten: Von Astrid Lindgren, Christine Nöstlinger, Dietl Erhard, Boie Kirsten, Maar Paul. Mit vielen lustigen Spieletipps
Jede Menge Quatsch-Geschichten: Von Astrid Lindgren, Christine Nöstlinger, Dietl Erhard, Boie Kirsten, Maar Paul. Mit vielen lustigen Spieletipps
Das Buch startet mit den Quatschgeschichten. Ich persönlich war schon nach zwei Seiten genervt.
„Der“ Franz sagt „der“ Gabi...
„Die“ Mama sagte...
Immer Artikel vor den Personen. Habe die dann beim vorlesen einfach weggelassen, dann fand ich nur noch die Geschichte langweilig. Aber manche mögen es wohl genau so wie gedruckt. Mein Sohn zum Beispiel und für den ist ja das Buch.
Es ist sehr groß bzw. dick, da hatte ich mich verschätzt. Ich hoffe also nun auf die folgenden Seiten.
Guter Einband, schnell geliefert. Würde das Buch allerdings nicht empfehlen.
Curse
Curse
I thoroughly enjoyed this book of paranormal suspense and mystery, especially as the events take place in upstate, New York, a location to which I am always drawn. It is a fairly well-written book, with a tightly woven plot. Although the author's knowledge of criminal law seems a bit sketchy, it does not unduly detract from the mystery within. Moreover, the main character Anna Young, around whom much of the plot revolves, is a very interesting, enigmatic character.

In Sandburg, a small, economically depressed hamlet, nestled in the Catskills region of New York State, a miserly slumlord named Henry Deutch is found dead of a heart attack. Anna Young, who along with her mother had been evicted from one of Henry's rundown apartments, eventually leading to her mother's death, is not shedding any tears over his demise. After all, she was heard to have sworn a blood oath of revenge against him for being the catalyst to her mother's death, and she is not sorry he is dead. In fact, before his death, she was seen casting spells and performing rituals that had disconcerted Henry.

When Henry dies amidst unusual trappings, the politically ambitious local prosecutor, Paula Richards, claims that Anna is responsible, having frightened him to death. She has her arrested, and Del Pearson, the young public defender, is assigned to represent her. Little do they know that the forces of evil are girding for battle. Anna, a practitioner of the Wiccan religion, is not surprised at the forces that are gathering. It is a battle for which she is well-prepared.

Readers of paranormal suspense will enjoy this book.
Monsieur Grincheux (Collection Monsieur Madame) (French Edition)
Monsieur Grincheux (Collection Monsieur Madame) (French Edition)
Ces petits livres m'ont accompagnés durant mon enfance et aujourd'hui à 30 ans, je suis nostalgique de les lire à mes petits.
Ils sont une valeur sûre et toujours appréciés par les enfants.
On les choisit selon son humeur du jour, et il y a toujours une petite morale dans l'histoire.
Ce ne sont pas de longues histoires du coup même les enfants en bas-âge arrivent à suivre et restent attentif au cours de l'histoire.
Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte.
Bäume. Betrachtungen und Gedichte.
Ich liebe Hermann Hesse, ist mein Lieblingsdichter, also fand ich auch dieses Werk einfach super. Vorallem es wird soo schön hingebungsvoll und zärtlich über die Bäume und ihre majestätische und für den Schreiber so menschliche Natur gedichtet und in schönen wahren Kurzgeschichten berichtet !!
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban 3-1 (Compact Paperback Edition) [In Japanese]
Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban 3-1 (Compact Paperback Edition) [In Japanese]
アメリカで日本語を学習している中級・上級の学生のために、ルビ付のバージョンを探していました。ついにペガサス文庫を発見しました。感謝にたえません。
I was looking for a copy of Harry Potter series in Japanese with "furigana." I discovered this Pegasus edition has all the kanji accompanied by furigana. I hope to adopt it for my teaching upper-division Japanese language reading.
Return Engagement (Settling Accounts, Book 1)
Return Engagement (Settling Accounts, Book 1)
I find Turtledove's writing forced and his characters flat. His alternate history , told through the eyes of his characters lacks the sweep of other authors in this area. Frankly there are a number of self published authors who do this type of book better and it makes you wonder why publishing houses choose one writer over another.
Stars and Stripes in Peril (Stars & Stripes Trilogy (Paperback))
Stars and Stripes in Peril (Stars & Stripes Trilogy (Paperback))
Having read both "Stars and Stripes Forever" and "Stars and Stripes in Peril", I must say Harry Harrison's second volume in his alternate history trilogy is certainly better than the first book. Much of what was wrong with the first book is not present in the second text, and "Peril" definitely has more to offer in terms of entertainmen value. However, "Peril" also from many of the same flaws that plagued "Forever", and is still far from perfect.
The valid complaints of implausibility that were aimed at "Forever" probably won't be directed at "Peril". Harrison pretty well established his divergence in "Forever"(as clumsily as that was), and "Peril" simply picks up in the new history that Harrison has created. Harrison begins "Peril" with a brief recap of the events of "Forever" in the form of a "memoir" by General Sherman, introducing new readers as well as reminding old readers.
Harrison is also very effective at keeping the action in one self-contained book. Though it is the second book in a trilogy, there are really no dangling plotlines that a reader will be plagued by until the next book.
Further, Harrrison's plot is extremely entertaining overall. Britain, still steaming over her loss in the first novel, plans to attack the U.S. through Mexico. At the same time, the U.S. is still dealing with several unresolved issues of the brief War Between the States, as the South is forced to adjust to the emancipation of the slaves,a more low-key analog to Radical Reconstrucion in our time line. With British invasion seemingly unavoidable, America looks to take the war to England's backyard.
"Stars and Stripes in Peril", as stated, is an entertaining read overall, but it does suffer many of "Forever's" faults. Harrison uses a third-person omniscient narrator to tell his story, which I must admit is not my favorite means narration. What is worse, while Harrison uses this method to further his plot at a rapid pace, he does so at the expense of characterization and effective sub-plots. The reader is allowed briefly into the minds of nearly every character that appears int his novel. The end result, however, is that no single character develops any actual depth, and the reader does not care one way or another who lives or who dies.
Another problem is Harrison's clear optimism with regards to America's relationship with the world. In "Stars and Stripes Forever" America cheerfully lets Canada go on her merry way, with no expansionist intent whatsoever, flying in the face of history. In "Stars and Stripes in Peril" America comes into possession of what can only be called an overseas empire, and again, Harrison, despite history, has his Americans let it go. While certainly idealistic, it just doesn't hold water.
Finally, though another conflict with Britain made sense for this book, Harrison certainly leads the reader to believe that the final book will feature the ultimate conflict between America and Britain. I must say that this idea has lost a great deal of luster. I would rather see new challenges to America's rising power in the world, rather than see yet another volume of America trounce on Britain yet again.
Ultimately, Harrison tells and entertaining yarn, that, much like a summer blockbuster film, gets a great deal of mileage out of a cool, larger-than-life concept. Taken in this way, it works just fine. Taken any other way, and it begins to wither. Still, I will read the third book when it comes out, and I am vaguely curious to see how this history could play out over time. For all of its flaws, it is, as I said, a cool concept.
Horrible Harry and the Dragon War
Horrible Harry and the Dragon War
Great Series, I have read every book in this series at some point in time to my K or 1st grade classes. They are only about 65-75 pages long, and every one teaches a lesson about how things are not always how they first appear. Horrible Harry has a reputation for getting into trouble, but he has a great heart and is always looking out for others. As a primary teacher, I highly recommend this series. They are at a 2nd Grade reading level and a Chapter Book that all beginning readers are proud to be reading.
Chronomancer and the Time God: Death of a Paradise
Chronomancer and the Time God: Death of a Paradise
“Surely you don’t take that seriously,” he said. “The Chronomancer is just a myth.”

A myth? A story? A legend? Enter the strange, mystical world of Zarethea and begin a journey that you will never forget.

James J Meadows, III weaves a new world of mysticism, magic, and sorcery through the voice of Alerhea, the beautiful bard, who brings the story to life for enraptured listeners.

Aliester, a powerful sorcerer and adventurer is mysteriously summoned to begin an epic quest in a surreal world where he will encounter assassins, mercenaries, priests, priestesses and monsters along with a handful of unlikely warriors. He has been chosen for a mission, the destiny of Zarethea hangs in the balance.

Zarethea is a strange, new enchanted world masterfully created by James Meadows. It is a world of wonder and magic, so effortlessly created through scenes and characters that readers will simultaneously feel as familiar as breath-taking and strange. I found myself drawn into the enchantment. This sphere where reality, mysticism, danger, and destiny meet in an ethereal world.

This is a place where appearances can be deceiving, truth and power can be corrupt, and where only courage, destiny, and the pursuit of truth can save the kingdom, Aliester and his (refreshingly) diverse companions.
Myth and mysticism fans will get lost in the characters and setting alone, but Meadows has crafted a compelling and urgent story that will leave you breathlessly turning pages, for long ago, “Zarethea was created by Rael, the god of time, and his consort Jessica, the goddess of peace. Rael embodied creation and destruction while his consort embodied sustainment and life. Together they forged the world. To guide and watch over the world, they gave birth to their five children, Xansees, Alhaszi, Samidin, Giana and Marchuk. For many years the gods walked among the people spreading their teachings and collecting followers. All seemed well on the surface. Below the surface, however, a storm was brewing…” Chaos, division, and war eventually destroyed the gods that walked in Zarethea. Rael, driven to fury, was shattered into pieces. Aliester is called upon to find and unite artifacts that may prove to be the key to Zarethea’s salvation ---- or destruction.

Aliester’s epic adventure takes him from decadent temples to dark and brooding forests where priests and kings, knights, monsters, and devious rulers seek to entice him, hinder his journey, or end his life.

This book is a showcase of the author’s talent. Readers will be mesmerized by a world incredibly unlike our own in essence, but nonetheless touching the heart, mind, and emotions common to our own.

As the story is finished the bard, Alerhea, leaves her listeners breathless and begging for more. James J Meadows, III does the same with this novel.
Wildest: India
Wildest: India
Despite all the following complaints, this is a really good nature documentary, the complaints I have are just reasons it is a "4 out of 5" and not a "5 out of 5". It just doesn't have quite the depth as really good wildlife shows do. Some animals only get a minute or so of screen time, lots of hunts are shot in separate angles so you never see the prey and predator in the same screen until after the kill, there are hardly any "den cams" or things like that. One unique aspect that I liked, although some might not, is that it included people in the area that had unique relationships with animals.
How to Build Real Hot Rods
How to Build Real Hot Rods
I bought a copy many many years ago when I started my first streetrod build, from the ground up...A Deuce 4 door sedan...I was about 35 at the time and as green as a baby to actual-factual info about "Rods, geometry, possible/usual points of failure" in general..Four years later after doing all the work myself except welding of the underpinnings/suspension and steering bracketry and the electrical wiring, I fired the engine that evening and test drove it around the airfield apron, near the hangar in which it was built...
The next day I sent a note to Tex Smith expressing my great appreciation for such a perfect instruction manual, so clearly written and user friendly....12 to 15 years later I sold the deuce when life dictated but since then always encouraged other younger folks to find a copy, (long-since out of print and mine lost in moves)......
I recently met a youngester wanting knowledge and info about the "olden days " of rodding so that he could build a street rod too...
I went to your site during a search and wound up buying two copies since they were offered at such a low price and all we needed was serviceable, legible copies............They both arrived, promptly and in Brand-New condition!...I could not be more pleased...
Thank you for this service,,,,,J B...
Vado a comprarmi le scarpe da tango (Italian Edition)
Vado a comprarmi le scarpe da tango (Italian Edition)
Sinora ho letto circa metà libro, vado avanti perché ho l'abitudine di non interrompermi a metà ma il libro lo trovo assai deludente: mi son fatto convincere dalle positive recensioni acquistandolo ma ora li considero 5,90€ buttati: una collezione di storielle scritte con mestiere, banali, vuote ed insignificanti; complessivamente un libro mediocre. Continuerò la lettura giusto per finirlo ma non credo che possa migliorare.
This Works Baby Sleep Pillow Spray 75 ml
This Works Baby Sleep Pillow Spray 75 ml
i wouldnt say it made him sleep better but it did get him to fall asleep faster, but i do use a baby tea to help him sleep better and that works really well so using both together feels like half the night time work has gone. just need to find a magic nappy now that will last all night.
one thing did concern me was the lavender in this as research suggests lavender for young boys isnt good.
ingredients for baby tea if anyone is dying for sleep Peppermint, Chamomile, Rooibos, Fennel and Licorice Root
Directions

Boil 8 oz of water and pour it over approximately 1 teaspoon of loose tea. Steep for 5 to 7 minutes. Allow to cool slightly before serving.
IMDb Movies & TV
IMDb Movies & TV
Well its brilliant,any thing you want to know about any film,tv show,dvd etc..its all here. Great app. Got to be a 5 star rating
Redmi Note 9 Pro Max (Champagne Gold, 6GB RAM, 64GB Storage) - 64MP Quad Camera & Latest 8nm Snapdragon 720G & Alexa Hands-Free | Extra Upto INR 1500 Off on Exchange | Upto 12 Months No Cost EMI
Redmi Note 9 Pro Max (Champagne Gold, 6GB RAM, 64GB Storage) - 64MP Quad Camera & Latest 8nm Snapdragon 720G & Alexa Hands-Free | Extra Upto INR 1500 Off on Exchange | Upto 12 Months No Cost EMI
Please don't buy it.

It's not a quality mobile, it just like Redmi Note 4. No special features added in Redmi Note 9 Pro Max which can be differentiate with Note 4. Battery is not so good, it doesn't retain power long time. Other company's mobile are giving some special technology like Samsung M31 (6000 mah battery, Amoled Screen, sony camera lense and so many features) in lesser price. It is not a value for money, not a good product. Why the company has fixed so high price? The answer I would like to know
from company. After purchasing it feel nothing worthy with the set because I am still using Redmi note 4. Just looting with custom in the Covid 19 pandemic situation. No discount isoffered in credit card nor no cost EMI nor Exchange in flash sale. In the name of flash sale seller makes fool to us. This is my personal experience and opinion. If any body hurts, I feel sorry, but I revealed the truth.

You can get far better mobile with this price of ₹18, 500. Its a cheating with the customer because price is high but no quality improvement in comparison with Redmi Note 4. I feel better Redmi note 4 with lesser price than 9 Pro Max.
malu Luxury Padded Floor Chair with Back Support - Meditation Cushion w/Adjustable Fully Folding Backrest and Removable Gray Washable Cover - Portable - Easy Wash Nylon Bottom - Vegan Leather Accents
malu Luxury Padded Floor Chair with Back Support - Meditation Cushion w/Adjustable Fully Folding Backrest and Removable Gray Washable Cover - Portable - Easy Wash Nylon Bottom - Vegan Leather Accents
Needed a floor chair while I wait for my couch to come in. Needed something to last at least a month.
A lot of floor chairs on Amazon seem to be for children, which is my guess as to why many people report breakage on other chairs after a couple weeks. I don't have time for that, for I am not a child.

I'm 5'8" and weigh 150.

The Malu looked promising, so I spend the extra bucks on it. I've had it for three weeks now, and it holds up. I can rock back and forth on it without worry that it will break. The various position help for either working on my computer while sitting at my coffee table, all the way to reclining and watching a movie.

It's comfortable, lightweight, and my girl fights me for it so I wish I'd gotten another haha.

the only thing I would recommend to not rip the upholstery is to get off it when you're adjusting the back. if you push it all the way flat while sitting on the other end, the fabric stretches which I think would accelerate wear and tear.
Dali's Greatest Secret
Dali's Greatest Secret
Salvador Dali says at the end of this documentary that all his paintings were enigmas. While this movie provides a reasonable background on Dali’s life and his other paintings, the primary focus is on his difficulties in fulfilling a commission provided him: to paint “Vision of Hell” in conjunction with the revelation of the third secret of Fatima, set for 1960. Both Dali and Fatima have been “flakes of my life,” to use Leonard Cohen’s expression, and thus the documentary provided much of interest. Paul Perry, who has published several best-selling books on near-death experiences and the afterlife, directed this documentary which was released in 2017.

It was in high school that I first became enthralled with Dali’s paintings, particularly “The Persistence of Memory” and “Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonitions of Civil War).” We also studied his painting “The Sacrament of the Last Supper” in high school.

It was in grade school, in 1957, that I saw the religious documentary on Fatima and how three shepherd children on July 13, 1957, were visited by the Blessed Virgin Mary, who said she was delivering messages to them for all humankind. The third and final “secret” would be revealed in 1960. It was a long three years that I waited in eager anticipation for the “secret,” of which there were inferences it would involve nuclear war with the Russians and possibly, the end of the world. On February 08, 1960, “The Vatican” decided it would not reveal the “secret.” Although I did not know the word “chutzpah” at the time, in the more ecumenical spirit of today, it does seem appropriate to describe the attitude of those in “The Vatican” who knew better than the Blessed Virgin Mary herself. The “why” remains another enigma. And the refusal to reveal the message was one of the first stepping stones for me on the road that challenged the validity of the authority of the Catholic Church’s hierarchy.

This documentary is a mixture of old film and still pictures of key individuals and events associated with Fatima as well as Salvador Dali. There are also interviews with two surviving members of Dali’s inner-circle, Robert Descharnes, the photographer, and Amanda Lear. A young seminarian who wanted to promote the “message of Fatima” to young people, and what better way, he asked, than a commissioned painting by Dali himself, on the first “secret” of Fatima, the Vision of Hell? He proposed the idea to John Haffert, who played a key leadership role in promoting Fatima and the commission was arranged.

I was astonished to learn that Haffert’s efforts helped created a “Blue Army” of 80 million (!) who were followers of Fatima. (WHAT that precisely means was never really explained). John Kennedy was purportedly a “militant” member. The documentary gently suggested that Haffert left the organization in disgust after the third “secret” was not revealed. Wikipedia would tell me, though this documentary did NOT, for unknown reasons, that the third “secret” was finally revealed in 2000. It was a rather anodyne message of “repenting” and “world peace.” Naturally there were those that claimed that not all was revealed.

Dali was a showman, who promoted (and probably exaggerated) his eccentricities. He became quite wealthy, with a home in Port Ligat, Costa Brava, and a castle in Pubol. He was a frequent visitor to the Hotel Maurice in Paris where he left numerous surrealist touches. The painting, “Visions of Hell” was completed a year late (1961) but since there was no “secret” it did not matter. It incorporates escargot forks inspired by their use at a luncheon at the St. Regis hotel in NYC. The painting, probably worth millions, would spend 30 years under a bed in a convent, forgotten. It is now in private hands. How all this came about is not explained.

Frankly, I feel that “Soft Construction…” is a better idea what hell might be like than the escargot forks. Serendipity led me to Fatima in January, 1990, which was definitely not a time of peace as American and Allied forces had just invaded Iraq, and some military commentators were predicting Baghdad would become a “Stalingrad on the Euphrates.” (Remember?) I also remember the seemingly endless rows of tawdry tables selling rosaries, scapulars, cigarette lighters, and assorted piles of junks, all emblazoned with that magic word of devotion: Fatima. Even in my cynical frame of mind, it was depressing.

For the documentary, stirring some memories, filling in some lacuna, leaving others, 3-stars.
Wiley Wallaby Australian Style Regaliz, sandía, bolsa de 10 onzas
Wiley Wallaby Australian Style Regaliz, sandía, bolsa de 10 onzas
This was the worst tasting candy. I was so excited for this to arrive because I love both natural and artificial watermelon flavors and I love the red soft licorice made by this company. I ignored the reviews on here because I just had to try it. And it was worse than I could have foreseen. It’s hard to describe but just... really terrible blah taste. Just.. one bite and throw away the package bad.
Caramelos artesanales de jengibre, miel de azahar y ajo negro elaborados sin azúcar añadido (originales y buenos para la garganta, 3 bolsas de 100g, con stevia), de Losquesosdemitio
Caramelos artesanales de jengibre, miel de azahar y ajo negro elaborados sin azúcar añadido (originales y buenos para la garganta, 3 bolsas de 100g, con stevia), de Losquesosdemitio
Sind angenehm im Geschmack und sollen der Gesundheit zuträglich sein. Das mag auch alles stimmen.
Aber ich hatte etwas Besonderes und Leckeres erwartet und muss sagen, dass ich den Geschmack langweilig und ziemlich flach finde. Eine leichte unaufdringliche Knobinote und angenehme Süße, aber vom Orangenblütenhonig oder der "Köstlichkeit", wie in der Beschreibung steht, schmecke ich nichts. Hab sie auch 2x verschenkt. Die Beschenkten empfanden den Geschmack auch als "unspektakulär", hatte mir "mehr" erhofft. Nix für ungut, über Geschmack lässt sich ja bekanntermaßen nicht streiten. ;-)

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