Javier Walker

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You Don't Know JS: Scope & Closures
You Don't Know JS: Scope & Closures
You Don't Know JS: Scope & Closures By: Simpson, Kyle There's a story behind this purchase, but it hasn't been written yet. Purchased At: $17.09 View on Amazo
Firstborn Academy: Shadow Trials
Firstborn Academy: Shadow Trials
Firstborn Academy: Shadow Trials by Isla Frost. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 115 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
Uma Carta de Amor (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Uma Carta de Amor (Em Portugues do Brasil)
Uma Carta de Amor (Em Portugues do Brasil) by Nicholas Sparks. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 23 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Sycamore Row (Korean Edition)
Sycamore Row (Korean Edition)
Sycamore Row (Korean Edition) by John Grisham. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
The Shining (DELUXE LIMITED GIFT EDITION)
The Shining (DELUXE LIMITED GIFT EDITION)
The Shining (DELUXE LIMITED GIFT EDITION) by Stephen King and Vincent Chong. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Shining
Shining
Shining by Stephen King, Julien Chatelet, et al.. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 148 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
It Grows on You: And Other Stories
It Grows on You: And Other Stories
It Grows on You: And Other Stories by Stephen King , Gary Sinese, et al.. Rated 4.2 out of 5 stars, with 44 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Hood (The King Raven Trilogy Book 1)
Hood (The King Raven Trilogy Book 1)
Hood (The King Raven Trilogy Book 1) by Stephen Lawhead. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 283 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Leaf
Leaf
Leaf by Stephen Michael King. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 11 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
High-Performance Java Persistence
High-Performance Java Persistence
High-Performance Java Persistence by Vlad Mihalcea. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 35 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Confident Ruby: 32 Patterns for Joyful Coding
Confident Ruby: 32 Patterns for Joyful Coding
Confident Ruby: 32 Patterns for Joyful Coding by Avdi Grimm and Sandi Metz. Rated 3 out of 5 stars, with 11 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Ruby programming category.
Assembly language for x86 processors
Assembly language for x86 processors
Assembly language for x86 processors by KIP R. IRVINE. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 63 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the R programming category.
My Wonderful Word Box
My Wonderful Word Box
My Wonderful Word Box by Tim Healey and Jo/ Margaret Burroughes/Chamberla. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 6 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the undefined category.
Front-End Tooling with Gulp, Bower, and Yeoman
Front-End Tooling with Gulp, Bower, and Yeoman
I have used Gulp, Bower and Yeoman in several front-end JavaScript projects. Indeed, I have used the tools singularly, in pairs, or all together--and never given them much thought. I have followed their basic installation and use steps without really understanding what each package does. This book (nicely written and well illustrated) delves into the importance of each tool and how it is structured. And the author proves example code for how each tool can be used. The book's goal is to show you how you can set up an efficient automated development workflow for web projects (initialization, development, and deployment). But it also can give you a new appreciation for Gulp, Bower, and Yeoman. Gulp is described as "the build system" and "heart of your toolchain," and Stefan Baumgartner explains that "Gulp's main goal is to define a file-processing pipeline that runs your source files through multiple stages." Bower, meanwhile, is a dependency manager or "package manager." It manages the "self-contained modules that your application uses as a foundation for new software parts or as an extension to existing software." And Yeoman provides a scaffolding tool "that gets your project up and running," Baumgartner writes. "It creates the necessary folders, copies initial files (like build scripts), applies boilerplate code, and triggers the installation of dependencies."

You should have some experience with JavaScript and Node.js to effectively use this book. My four-star review of "Front-End Tooling" is closer to four and a half stars. I think that some of the code examples in the book could have been presented with a bit more clarity (such as where to best position some of the described new lines of code). Nonetheless, this is a worthy book for web developers wanting to know more about working with Gulp, Bower, or Yeoman.

My thanks to Manning Books for providing an advance reading copy for review.
An Ember in the Ashes
An Ember in the Ashes
If I look back at the feelings I’ve had for Young Adult books the last couple of years, I have to admit that have been mostly negative. Especially when books got quite the hype, somehow I didn’t get it. So I was a bit reluctant to believe the hype that surrounded this book. With a Goodreads rating of 4,32 stars and a synopsis that hinted at typical Young Adult storylines, I was scared that this was going to be another book that just wasn’t for me. But somehow, I loved it. It has all the elements that should make me not like it, but somehow Sabaa Tahir managed to weave it into a story that hooked me completely.

Laia lives with her brother and her grandparents in the poorer neighbourhoods of the Empire. They are all so called ‘Scholars’, which is a class of people defined by the exact characteristic the name refers to. They are ruled by the Martials, a wealthy and ruthless class of people that are trained specifically to stay in power. Her parents were rebel leaders of the Revolution and were murdered by the Martials. Her brother has been sneaking out during the night for the last few months, but Laia doesn’t want to ask why. When he comes home one night and asks her to hide his sketch book that he always carries with him, she alarmed that he might have done something dangerous. Their house gets raided by Martials and a specially trained assassin, a Silver Masks, because they suspect her brother of working together with the underground rebels who want to overthrow them. They take her brother into custody.

Laia manages to escape and tries to find the rebels her parents leaded so long ago and together with them hatches a plan to infiltrate the Martial academy to get inside information in return for their help in freeing her brother.

The other point-of-view character is Elias Veturius, a boy who is in his last year of training at the Military Academy to become a Silver Mask. However, he doesn’t feel comfortable being this cold, ruthless person they want him to be and he plans to run away after his graduation. He has a best friend, Helene, who he has this strange chemistry with, but his mind is more on escaping his military future than on anything else. His grandfather, Quin Veturius, is the patriarch of the genus Veturius and a powerful, rich man. The curious character in his family though is his mother who is also the Commander of the Military Academy. There’s no love lost between mother and son, which has also soured her relationship with her father, Quin.

When the mysterious and almost mythical Augurs come to fulfil a prophecy they made a long time ago regarding the next Emperor, he has a difficult dilemma put before him. Will he leave, or will he stay and fulfil his destiny and try to make the Empire a better place?

I’ve read some reviews pointing out that the names for the different layers of the society (Scholars, Martials, etc.) are a bit easy and unoriginal. I think I will have to agree with them on this point. It’s not very imaginative and it probably could have had more exotic, made-up names that went with the fantasy world. However, it simplifies the story to a certain degree and that’s not always a bad thing. It gave more room to focus on the character development instead of the world.

It is quite obvious that at some point both main character’s paths will cross and as I mentioned before, this does have typical elements of a Young Adult book, so it seemed pretty likely that they would fall in love. However, both also have other love interest, which make it a bit more tense and uncertain. In the end I really liked the chemistry between all these characters and how it led to certain confrontations, but never seemed to resolve into one particular relationship. It leaves a lot open for the next book, which will have the more romantic souls among us definitely yearning to read more.

I’ve always been a fan of a sort of “games” format in books, where there are for example different trials for the main character(s) to overcome. That’s probably another reason why I liked this book so much. An Ember in the Ashes chose to utilise a darker side of this. These particular scenes were some of the most cruel and emotionally heavy, but somehow it fit very well with the story and only made it stronger. The fact that I didn’t know what the trials were going to be and how they would turn out, added that element of surprise that I love when reading.

I really enjoyed most of the characters. Elias is definitely a complex character and his part of the story was probably my favourite. His internal struggle to do the right thing while being born on the wrong side of the good-evil balance was really powerful. He also had some difficult choices to make and he definitely decided to follow a path I would never have chosen. Another one of my favourites was Helene, his best friend. She’s such a strong and vulnerable person at the same time, it left me rooting for her. She is very loyal to her family and to the Martials, but her loyalty for Elias rivals that which gives her a lot to think about too. The chemistry between them is palpable and made for some enjoyable reading. I think my third favourite character was the kitchen slave Izzi, who grew up in the Military Academy as a kitchen slave to the Commander. She’s like a delicate flower that completely blooms open throughout the book.

I think you can see from this review that the character development for most of the characters was definitely one of the main positives in this book, along with the actual storyline. I already aluded to it earlier, but in terms of worldbuilding we don’t get a lot. It didn’t bother me personally, there was enough going on to distract me from it, but I would love to see a bit more in the next book.

In the end I was really sad when I finished the book because I wanted more. I can’t wait to buy the second book and get reading again, because the book ended on quite a surprising note and I’m dying to know what happens next.
The Hunting Wind: An Alex McKnight Mystery (An Alex McKnight Novel Book 3)
The Hunting Wind: An Alex McKnight Mystery (An Alex McKnight Novel Book 3)
Steve Hamilton delivers another solid performance! I've just started reading the Alex McKnight novels, so far this one is my favorite.
First off, I really enjoyed the atmosphere that Hamilton creates with the location being in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. It reminds me of Poisonville/Personville in Dashiell Hammett's Red Harvest.

Hamilton did a great job of linking years and time together between two close friends before the big leagues and after when they've both careers cut short. However, they are both linked by one time, place and a woman. McKnight's friend is in search of this lost woman because he could not let her go. Little does McKnight know, there is something deeper to the connection with this missing woman. Hamilton's characters are great and relate-able. I think we all have a friend like Randy, who has an itch that can't be scratched. I felt bad for McKnight being dragged into a case he didn't really want, but wanted to help out his friend. McKnight once again demonstrates his dominant trait of loyalty and trustworthiness. He doesn't stop until the mystery is solved. I think we could all use a friend like McKnight.

Great book, leaves you guessing til the end.
Best Dearborn Stories Voices From Henry Ford's Hometown
Best Dearborn Stories Voices From Henry Ford's Hometown
Best Dearborn Stories Voices From Henry Ford's Hometown by Glenn Good, David Wisniewski, Karen and O'Kray. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Henry Ford" category.

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