Luciana Ross

Joined a year ago

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Learn JavaScript VISUALLY
Learn JavaScript VISUALLY
Learn JavaScript VISUALLY by Ivelin Demirov. Rated 3.1 out of 5 stars, with 28 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
JavaScript Grammar: In Color
JavaScript Grammar: In Color
JavaScript Grammar: In Color by Greg Sidelnikov. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Mastering OpenLayers 3
Mastering OpenLayers 3
Mastering OpenLayers 3 by Gabor Farkas. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide (6th Edition)
HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide (6th Edition)
HTML & XHTML: The Definitive Guide (6th Edition) by Chuck Musciano and Bill Kennedy. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 29 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Conversations with J. K. Rowling
Conversations with J. K. Rowling
Conversations with J. K. Rowling by Lindsey Fraser. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 16 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
Night Music
Night Music
Night Music by Jojo Moyes, Clare Corbett, et al.. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 435 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Fünf Kopeken (German Edition)
Fünf Kopeken (German Edition)
Fünf Kopeken (German Edition) by Sarah Stricker. Rated 3.2 out of 5 stars, with 61 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Dr. Death: An Alex Delaware Novel
Dr. Death: An Alex Delaware Novel
Dr. Death: An Alex Delaware Novel by Jonathan Kellerman. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 150 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Newsweek magazine (April 9, 2012) Forget the Church Follow Jesus, Hidden Stories of the Titantic, Can Tiger Woods Get Over Himself, The Travon Tinderbox, John Grisham on his $6M Screw-Up, Addiction-One Last High (Volume CLIX, Number 15)
Newsweek magazine (April 9, 2012) Forget the Church Follow Jesus, Hidden Stories of the Titantic, Can Tiger Woods Get Over Himself, The Travon Tinderbox, John Grisham on his $6M Screw-Up, Addiction-One Last High (Volume CLIX, Number 15)
Newsweek magazine (April 9, 2012) Forget the Church Follow Jesus, Hidden Stories of the Titantic, Can Tiger Woods Get Over Himself, The Travon Tinderbox, John Grisham on his $6M Screw-Up, Addiction-One Last High (Volume CLIX, Number 15) by undefined. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Mr Standfast
Mr Standfast
Mr Standfast by John Buchan, Felbrigg Napoleon Herriot, et al.. Rated 3.9 out of 5 stars, with 107 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Echo Burning (Jack Reacher, Book 5)
Echo Burning (Jack Reacher, Book 5)
Echo Burning (Jack Reacher, Book 5) by Lee Child. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 4861 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Learning PHP 5
Learning PHP 5
Learning PHP 5 by David Sklar. Rated 3.7 out of 5 stars, with 44 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Web Application Development with PHP 4.0
Web Application Development with PHP 4.0
Web Application Development with PHP 4.0 by Tobias Ratschiller and Till Gerken. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 31 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Oracle SQL Developer
Oracle SQL Developer
Oracle SQL Developer by Ajith Narayanan. Rated 3 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Oracle PL / SQL For Dummies
Oracle PL / SQL For Dummies
Oracle PL / SQL For Dummies by Michael Rosenblum and Paul Dorsey. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 37 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
The Complete Introduction to Node.js
The Complete Introduction to Node.js
I liked this book - such as it was. It appears to be the first in a series of articles (possibly blog posts) that were converted into a Kindle. At 55 pages and 5 chapters, it is clearly not complete. I've perused the author's entries on Medium and he's a qualified expert. I'm hoping this book gets an update. But for now, it's not even close to "complete."
express - Middleware für node.js (German Edition)
express - Middleware für node.js (German Edition)
Nicht mehr ganz so “erhellend” wie der Basisband über node.js. Die strukturierte Einführung ist extrem kurz gehalten. Der Referenzteil führt viele Möglichkeiten auf, die vorher nicht behandelt wurden. Dennoch gut für Neueinsteiger – nicht für Anwender mit Erfahrung zu empfehlen.
How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett
How to Pick Stocks Like Warren Buffett
Vick is a stock analyst himself with experience as an editor of a market newsletter. His investing experience and his clear writing help in learning about the important factors in Warren Buffett's investment style. The main problem is that there have been some changes in Buffett's style since the book was written. It does remain an excellent source of insight into his way of investing and thinking about investing.

Buffet showed an interest in earning money at a very early age. He did a great deal of experimenting with different investment techniques. Mathematics was of particular interest and very useful in analyzing businesses and possible investments. The magic of compound interest was particularly intriguing and he realized almost immediately that every dollar he didn't spend would compound in the future to a much greater amount. With this in mind he developed an aversion to spending money that could otherwise be invested. He was captivated with the book “The Intelligent Investor” by Benjamin Graham, and was impressed enough that he decided to study under Graham at the Columbia business school. He and Graham argued different points in class. Buffet wound up working for Graham for a short time, then started his own investment firm.

One technique Buffet uses is to compare all possible investments with long-term bonds especially treasuries. The long term treasuries are considered the safest investments (not accounting for inflation) so if you can get 3% on long term treasury bonds any other investment must have a better return since they will be riskier. He then uses the long term bond rate say 3% as the discount rate. The discount rate is supposed to take into account the volatility of the investments being studied as a proxy for risk. So if an investment is considered much riskier than treasury bonds you select a higher discount rate say 15%. Buffet makes this easier for himself by primarily looking at companies that have long-term growth rates that are rising and vary little. The problem for ordinary investors is that much business and investment expertise goes into selecting the appropriate discount rate to account for growth, volatility and risk. This has proved to be virtually impossible to do consistently even for professional investors.

Buffet is generally looking for a company that is selling well below its’ calculated intrinsic value. Intrinsic value can be defined simply: It is the discounted value of the cash that can be taken out of a business during its remaining life. The intrinsic value is very difficult to calculate precisely since it depends on many factors, but in a very rough way over long periods of time changes in the book value of the co Gladmpany gives you a general idea of changes in its intrinsic value. There can, however, be large discrepancies between the two, and even larger differences with the stock market price. He believes in having a margin of safety by purchasing a company well below its’ intrinsic value when possible. This is most likely during significant market downturns.

There is some correlation between the long term growth of the book value and the return on equity, ROE, of the company and the company stock price. There is also a lot of fluctuation due to stock buybacks, the normal business cycle, and companies playing games with their numbers to look good. Generally increasing earnings, and return on equity, are good for the future stock price. But there are many factors such as buying back the company stock, borrowing more, etc., that could affect the future price of a stock. Buffet is usually looking for big stable companies to buy such as Coca-Cola, Procter& Gamble, Wells Fargo that have a long history of stable, increasing earnings and paying increasing dividends.

The next step is not to lose. This is easier said than done since the price of stocks obviously fluctuate quite a bit. He studies many companies carefully to find those that will do well in the long-term. To minimize the chances of a loss he waits to get the best price he can with the intention of holding forever. Over the years he has shown a preference for purchasing whole companies with the owners staying on to actually run the business itself. His chief function seems to be to allocate the income streams from many companies he is associated with into new and profitable businesses and the expansions of existing businesses. Since you coninue to discuss purchasing stocks, this might be be better at the end or before the next to the last paragraph. )

Several times in his long investing career he announced that he couldn't find any worthwhile stocks to invest as in during 1969, 1987, 2001, and 2008. Other times he announced he was like a kid in the candy store and there were many stocks he wanted to buy in 1974, 1982, 2002 and 2009. He uses many criteria to choose stocks to buy. Apparently when most of his criteria are showing that stocks are not a good buy he considers it may be a good time to think about selling. In other words he does the opposite of the average investor. He sells when everything is looking great and profits abound, he buys when it looks like the end of the financial world. This is quite easy to say, but quite difficult to do in practice.

Many other techniques are used to maximize profit such as arbitrage, especially in takeovers, options -both calls and puts, and the futures market. Buffett uses these techniques to improve his chances of getting exceptional long-term results. All these require some special knowledge and good timing. The stability and financial power of Berkshire have been used to get very good deals on convertible securities that ordinary investors don't have a chance of getting.

Craigslist with this piece of s***Buffett has several suggestions for better investment results. One is to consider a stock as an actual business and research as if you were going to be the owner for the next decade or longer. Another is to realize the business value and the stock price frequently show a large difference. It is best to purchase the stock when its price is depressed, which is most likely when entire market is in free fall. Look at stock fluctuations as your friend rather than your enemy. Try to buy a stock when there's a great deal of pessimism in its area and the price is depressed. Sell a stock when there's a great deal of euphoria and the price seems like it will climb forever. Finally always look for a margin of safety, some advantage that will make price fluctuations less severe.
Jimmy Buffett: A Good Life All the Way
Jimmy Buffett: A Good Life All the Way
Before I can truly review this book, I need to provide some background. I'm not a Parrothead, although I know Parrotheads. Like many non-followers, I have tagged along with other hardcore Jimmy Buffett fans to several shows over the past decades (Pine Knob, Buckeye Lake, The Palace, etc.) because seeing Jimmy live is, quite simply, a good time with friends. Whether you know the legends or just like the music, the concerts are a fun evening out (or whole day... or weekend). I originally purchased this book for a fan, the type that lives and breaths all things Jimmy. He, after devouring the book, passed it back to me and told me I HAD to read it.

From a non-fan perspective, this book is DEEP. Not deep in the philosophical sense, but deep in the shear amount of details and research that must have gone into the collection of stories and history within its pages. The book starts out with a lovely short chapter on the formation of the band. It reads more like a novel and is beautifully and vividly described. Even though I didn't know all the characters per say, I was able to follow the action. Hard core fans will have no issues following the story of Jimmy's arrival in Key West. The second chapter then jumps back into time to some family history, specifically Grandfather Buffett, the sea captain. While this chapter was a bit more academic and read more like history than novel, it does set the subtle ebb and flow of the book, like waves on the beach, skillfully moving from story telling to history lessons in the Encyclopedia Buffett. The book mostly follows this pattern, jumping from scene to scene, and through various places and times.

As a fan of history, and a good biography, I found the tales and history surrounding Mr. Buffett fascinating and well told. There is so much lore surrounding the legend of Jimmy Buffett, it was really fun to see the origins of the folklore (like any good hero, there is typically some truth to the surrounding myths). Additionally, after reading through all the history I feel quite lazy in comparison. The Buffetts and the extended family of personalities that have come and gone from the Coral Reefer band have (wildly in some cases) accomplished way more than I could ever hope to in my lifetime. The productivity of the collective is amazing, and Jimmy is STILL going, not so much the legend of years past... but still traveling, touring, and transforming into the ultimate master of brand and marketing he is today.

Even though I had to web search for some of the references in the book (note: Parrotheads will likely not have this issue), I still found every chapter well worth the read. This was obviously a labor of love for the author, and I suspect it was a blast to research, collect these tales, and spin the yarns. Peering over at Mr. White's other offering Springsteen: Album by Album , which seems to be quite a different type of book, he does like his musical icons.
He's Lying Sis: Uncover the Truth Behind His Words and Actions, Volume 1
He's Lying Sis: Uncover the Truth Behind His Words and Actions, Volume 1
This book came at the right time. Three weeks after I had a break up I woke up and cried out to God to bring peace to my heart and help me see the plan he has for me. This book was discovered an hour after my prayer. I knew and saw all the red flags but decided to ignore them because I felt it was growing pains and we would get over the hurdles. I had been praying to God to reveal whether this was the right man for me. Well my ex took the initiative and ended the relationship after 3 months of dating. I was broken, disappointed and hurt because I had invested so much of myself even after 3 months. This book reminded me to trust my intuition, there are good men out there and continue to be open about who you are and what you expect upfront.
The Insider: The Private Diaries of a Scandalous Decade
The Insider: The Private Diaries of a Scandalous Decade
The Insider is an addictive read, providing compelling insight into newspaper editing and the role tabloids play in politics and public relations. Intriguing enough just to revisit ten years of scoops and scandals, it is most interesting to see how liberally supposed news stories get 'splashed' recklessly over tabloid covers without serious substantiation or attempt at impartiality. It also gives character to the hitherto invisible journalists behind these vitriolic, hectoring papers - often foul-mouthed, hard-drinking egomaniacs it seems - and exposing the hypocrites and sycophants in the world of celebrity. The question you have to ask yourself while reading this is whether Piers Morgan is to be trusted. The world he appears to inhabit is the same slightly dubious reality that the tabloids reflect, and Morgan is a shameless name-dropper who enjoys boasting of his relationships with Diana and Tony Blair. He seems fit to burst with smug satisfaction at doing over his rivals and is quick to point out how clever he is. He likes to think that he was, as editor of a major tabloid, one of the most powerful people in public life and politics, depicting the government as pandering to his whims. I think he overstates the case, and is perhaps a little naive, but this is no less enjoyable a read for that.
Finding My Virginity: The New Autobiography
Finding My Virginity: The New Autobiography
This is an interesting book no doubt. Branson is at his best when discussing various companies within his Virgin Group and how they were started, while his descriptions about how he makes business decisions is valuable for both establish business people and budding entrepreneurs. He is at his most dismal, however, when promulgating, in detail and even full chapters, some of his political causes and beliefs which are so left wing that at times it smacks of self indulgence as if he has to describe how liberal and truly open minded he really is. Of course, at the end of the day, life and all of its myriad of issues are a bit more complicated than that. He gives numerous pages to those he claims to have had good relations with and admires (Hillary Clinton and Barack Obama - not unsurprisingly - and those apparently less stellar, Donald Trump for example), but this is not necessary, even if it's true, and detracts from the book - leaving me to wonder where his editor is at times like these.

I also find it a real stretch of the imagination when he described his trip to Vietnam in 2015 and how he “told the crowd” about his "connection" to the country. However, that connection was only as a Vietnam War protester back in the 60's and not even in the US, but in the UK. Since I’ve lived and worked for over 5 years in Vietnam, his assertion is more than a stretch, it's disingenuous.

If Branson would have toned down some of his blatant political rhetoric and also spent a bit less time writing on arbitrary domestic/family issues, it would have made for a smoother, and more insightful - albeit- shorter read. I too, like other reviewers, wish I could ask for a refund, but the time for that has expired.
Steve Jobs, Richard Branson et Jack Welch : les leçons incontournables de trois patrons emblématiques: Edition spéciale : management et entrepreunariat (French Edition)
Steve Jobs, Richard Branson et Jack Welch : les leçons incontournables de trois patrons emblématiques: Edition spéciale : management et entrepreunariat (French Edition)
Steve Jobs, Richard Branson et Jack Welch : les leçons incontournables de trois patrons emblématiques: Edition spéciale : management et entrepreunariat (French Edition) by Allan K. Thomas, Des Dearlove, et al.. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with null ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Richard Branson" category.
The Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad: Henry Fords Railroad
The Detroit, Toledo and Ironton Railroad: Henry Fords Railroad
This book goes way beyond your typical railroad book. This is an outstanding corporate history that happens to be about a railroad that went through a succession of owners and finally gelled under the ownership and guidance of Henry Ford. It is filled with text, stories, maps and photos that demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of a railroad in America. Every business library and college archive should have a copy without exception. This book is a must have for every railroad buff. If you don't spend a penny for another book, buy this one!

Dan
La Diva
La Diva
LA DIVA (Billboard #146 Albums Chart and #25 R&B Albums Chart) has been frequently maligned by the critics and and even more sadly, was her least commercially successful release on Atlantic Records. In a major cover story, Interview Magazine noted, in the discograpy following Aretha's interview, that 1979's LA DIVA was the "nadir" of her entire career. It may not be Aretha's finest hour but she has never been in better voice. Her instrument was at its absolute glorious peak during that 4yr period from 1975-79. For Arethaphiles, that alone, is cause for celebration, but there's a lot more going on here than just the VOICE. In full disclosure I must confess that I played certain tracks from this album almost daily, for several years and that I adore the front cover photo. You may be too young to remember, but when this album was released the the word "diva" was very rarely used in everyday speech, nothing like it is today. As always Aretha was setting the stage for things to come.

Van McCoy's syrupy strings and the Ray Coniff Singers type back-up vocal arangements nearly overwhelm the two torch songs, "What If I Should Ever Need You" and McCoy's own "You Brought Me Back to Life"; yet the melodies and lyrics are touching, and Aretha's vocals convey such a heartbroken though restrained mania that both tracks end up being unforgettable. I'd love to hear her sing these songs w/ only piano acccompaniment.
Her son Clarence joins her on his own compostion, the lovely aching ballad, "You Were Made for Me." It's about as close to a Marvin Gaye (think a teen-aged Marivn)/Re duet that were ever gonna get.

It was the disco era and on her final Atlantic effort Lady Soul took the full plunge. Her self-penned "Ladies Only" (#33 Billboard R&B Singles Chart), released the same week as the much more successful dance song, with a similar title, Kool and the Gang's "Ladies Night, was the lp's first single. While well sung, it's corny and lacking in her trademark Re-funk. She also wrote "Only Star" which is pure Devine Diva Drag-Queen Disco, completely irresistable. Though not a huge disco fan I'll take Re's few attempts over the typical Donna Summer fair any day. The album's worst song, another disco entry, "The Feeling", (a rip-off of the Melba Moore dance hit "This Is It") frantically goes nowhere with Re's vocals buried way too deep in the mix.

Though this album is remembered as her failed attempt at disco, most fans don't realize that Re also tackled some rocking R&B numbers with a vengeance: the Emotions "Reasons Why", Zulema's "Half a Love" and what maybe the album's most inspired 5 minutes and 20 seconds, Lalome Washburn's "It's Gonna a Get a Bit Better". On that track Aretha sings, screams, shrieks, moans and hollers the same line over and over-about a million times, on top of a throbbing bass, but... never repeats the same phrasing once. Gospel fervor marries funk ballet.
Finally in response to Natalie Cole's pushing her off the sales charts by employing Aretha's own style, her Majesty delivers the self-penned, "Honey I Need Your Love", a recording that is absolutely perfect in every way. It should have been the first single even if it wasn't a disco song. She shows Natalie how to rock, shout and swing it right on this one (just as she had equisitely demonstrated to Natalie, on a previous lp's title song, "You", how one should nail a soul ballad.) Don't mess with the Queen. "Honey I Need Your Love" is essential for any Aretha career anthology, yet it has criminally never been available on any Aretha cd, ever. Call the Cops! There are over a 100 cds out there with the same 50 Aretha hits but there's never been a single one with any of the magical cuts from the following albums: LA DIVA, YOU, SWEET PASSION, WITH EVERYTHING I FEEL IN ME or ALMIGHTY FIRE! These dismissed, overlooked and forgotten albums represent the era when The Queen's voice was at it's most volcanically flawless, powerful, sweet and high!
ATTN RHINO: GET ON THE STICK!
Ella and Louis
Ella and Louis
Ella and Louis by Ella Fitzgerald & Louis Armstrong. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Louis Armstrong" category.
Love And Theft
Love And Theft
Sandwiched between the 1997 Grammy-winning `Time out of Mind' and the equally excellent `Modern Times' in 2006, "Love and Theft" (the album's title is intentionally in quotes) was famously released to the world on 11th September 2001, its launch understandably eclipsed by other news of the day. This album is therefore central to Dylan's impressive late-in-life canon of work as a mature artist.

L&T paints on a broad canvas the varied colors of rock and roll, slow blues and R&B, bluegrass, rockabilly and country styles; it's an odyssey through American folk styles and as great as anything Dylan has produced in a long career of outstanding creativity.

With a trademark-ironic quip, Dylan himself said of the album "I think of it as a `Greatest Hits' album - without the hits". As so often with Dylan this throw-away line conceals a hidden truth: many of the songs are sing-able and get the feet tapping. Lyrically, these slice-of-life stories in the great American folk tradition sound bang up-to-date: is this why his music never seems to age?

It's hard to pick out individual songs in a collection so universally excellent, but "Mississippi" (an unused leftover from the `Time out of Mind' sessions re-recorded for L&T) has a rare repeat-play-please poignancy and was described by Rolling Stone as "A drifter's love song that seems to sum up Dylan's entire career, a rambling classic that ranks up there with `Tangled up in Blue'."

Bob Dylan shows no sign of going off the boil with age, or of hanging up his guitar. He really is truly the heir to his teenage idol Woody Guthrie, yet has reached global audiences Guthrie could never hope for. His uniqueness is in his refusal to be pigeionholed or typecast and he is, and always has been, his own man with his own unique vision and style. He is in some ways his own genre, all by himself. Long may he thrive.
The Basement Tapes Raw: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11
The Basement Tapes Raw: The Bootleg Series Vol. 11
Whereas the 1975 double-album The Basement Tapes had been prepared by Robbie Robertson and Rob Fraboni in an attempt to make the recordings sound like a finished product, the intention of this Bootleg series is to present them in their informal, homemade state. Garth Hudson had recorded the sessions on a stereo open-reel tape machine with the intention of mixing them to mono, and both the 1975 and 2014 versions sound mono, whether they are or not. This is not a review so much as a comparison.
If you own the 1975 set there no songs that you won't find here apart from those by the Band alone. These weren't actually from the Woodstock 1967 sessions anyway, although one of those songs, Don't Ya Tell Henry, which had a vocal from Levon Helm, does appear here with an earlier Bob Dylan vocal.
Six tracks appear in restored versions, with cleaner sound and reverb removed, and another eight that had additional instruments added for the 1975 release appear here in their original state. The other seventeen songs were not on the 1975 set and all but three of these were previously unreleased, those being a restored version of Quinn The Eskimo, I'm Not There and Santa Fé.
Here is the breakdown of the 1975 tracklist as the tracks appear on the 2014 RAW release
Odds And Ends (alternate take)
Orange Juice Blues (not included, by the Band only on original release)
Million Dollar Bash (alternate take)
Yazoo Street Scandal (not included, by the Band only on original release)
Goin' To Acapulco (without overdubs)
Katie's Been Gone (not included, by the Band only on original release)
Lo And Behold! (alternate take)
Bessie Smith (not included, by the Band only on original release)
Clothes Line Saga (restored)
Apple Suckling Tree (without overdubs)
Please, Mrs. Henry (restored)
Tears Of Rage (without overdubs)
Too Much Of Nothing (alternate take)
Yea! Heavy And A Bottle Of Bread (without overdubs)
Ain't No More Cane (alternate take)
Crash On The Levee (Down In The Flood)(restored)
Ruben Remus (not included, by the Band only on original release)
Tiny Montgomery (without overdubs)
You Ain't Goin' Nowhere (without overdubs)
Don't Ya Tell Henry (alternate take)(by the Band only on original release)
Nothing Was Delivered (without overdubs)
Open The Door, Homer (restored)
Long Distance Operator (not included, by the Band only on original release)
This Wheel's On Fire (without overdubs).
Bob Dylan: A Life In 37 Albums
Bob Dylan: A Life In 37 Albums
I'm sure that many Dylan fans would find this all a little superficial and not offering anything new. Nevertheless I found it a pleasant run through of the studio albums. Nice to have an illustration of each cover; an actual listing of the individual tracks would have been nice.

Mr Redford mentions many of the tracks recorded at the time which ended on the cutting room floor, destined for the Bootlegs. But as said, nothing new for the experts, but I found the information and opinions expressed quite entertaining.

All in all worth the price.
Partners In Crime
Partners In Crime
Rupert Holmes' "Partners In Crime" was originally released in/ around September of 1979, and it's where you'll find the huge/ notorious #1 hit "Escape" aka "The Pina Colada Song". Although the song is sly as well as well-crafted & insanely catchy, its whimsical nature might lead listeners to think this 1979 album is some kind of wacky late '70s relic that's best forgotten. That couldn't be less true. Like usual, Rupert wrote every song on this album himself, & he displays his boundless songwriting creativity by unleashing one astonishingly well-crafted, inspired gem after another. "The Pina Colada Song" starts the album off in great fashion, but it's only the tip of the iceberg. The title track makes great use of a galloping drum line, features mind-bogglingly crafty lyrics, and has a deathless chorus. "Nearsighted" is a sentimental, melodic ballad and a solid example of Holmes' knack for writing lyrics that are at once humorous & moving. "Lunch Hour" has an off-kilter verse melody, a hilarious chorus, & an extended salsa-flavored instrumental coda. The reggae-flavored "Drop It" is about wanting a girlfriend to just lighten up & not be so serious & it features some laugh-out-loud humorous lyrics. "Him", another big hit, is a haunting song about a cheating girlfriend and features a punchy, dramatic chorus. "Answering Machine", like "Escape", is another highly whimsical song & unsurprisingly was released as a single (it reached the top 40)--with its mockery of the 30-second time limit of "old-fashioned" answering machines, the lyrics are, in a sense, quite dated in today's high-tech world, but the song is lots of fun nonetheless. He delivers another splendid ballad with the wistful "The People That You Never Get To Love", & song that neatly points out how certain people you casually pass by each day could have been "the one". The album ends with the ultra-catchy minor-keyed "In You I Trust" which is about the comfort of being able to depend on/ have trust in your companion in an otherwise devious, ever-changing (for the worse) world--it's also got a cool, Genesis-y instrumental break. If you're looking for an album that's loaded with catchy hooks, you've come to a great place--it's simply incredible how consistently super-catchy this album is. The production values are absolutely first-rate as well, as are the performances--aside from a Chrissy Faith vocal part on "Answering Machine", Rupert does all the vocals on here & plays all the keyboards, & guitarist Dean Bailin does masterful work playing all the guitars on the album. Rupert's vocals are loaded with personality & he gives just the right vocal treatment to suit each song. To make some comparisons, Rupert's songwriting fluency along with his ease of incorporating various styles brings to mind early Joe Jackson, but without the anger. At the same time, his combination of seedy lyrics & musically sophisticated, at times jazzy, soft rock strongly brings to mind Steely Dan. If you're a Dan fanatic, I can't imagine not loving this. By all means, this is complimentary! One thing about this album though is that his one of a kind knack for humorous-yet-charming romantic lyrics isn't very strongly in evidence. And that's the only thing that makes me hesitant in recommending this album as an ideal place to start discovering Rupert--his smile-inducing, sweetly romantic and tender side is in relatively low abundance on here. It's by no means absent--"Nearsighted" is a solid example, & in a way, so is "Escape", yet "Escape" feels more like a comedy skit-ish song than a heart-tugging romantic one. His 1981 album "Full Circle", as well as his brilliant 1994 "comeback" album "Scenario" both feature his tender side much more strongly on such terrific tracks as "Loved By the One You Love", "You Remind Me Of You", "One Born Every Minute", "The Eighties Never Happened", & "The Hurting Part". Admittedly, this album ends up being pretty low in the `heart-tugging' department--if you`re afraid that might turn you off, try starting with his "Full Circle" album. That's not an actual complaint though--"Partners In Crime" is a unique, brilliant, & irresistibly fun album that any serious music listener will get a blast out of.

(P.S. The standard MCA Records CD version of "Partners In Crime" does feature printed lyrics for each song & thorough album credits, but the sound quality overall is very disappointing, plus certain tracks fade out quite early--considerably earlier than they do on the original vinyl on Infinity Records.)
1500W Continuous/ 3000W Peak Pure Sine Wave Inverter DC 12V to AC 120V Car Power Inverter with Dual AC Outlets
1500W Continuous/ 3000W Peak Pure Sine Wave Inverter DC 12V to AC 120V Car Power Inverter with Dual AC Outlets
 I currently have it hooked up to a 12V deep cycle battery. No problem having a TV, Roku, 4k blu ray player and even a stereo and it running constant power. I have not gotten the wattage near 1500 yet, but it has been effective with what I have done.

The unit is very solidly built. Alarm lets you know when the voltage in your battery has dropped too low. Item comes with 2 solid cables to connect negative and positive. Cables easily connect to terminals on the inverter.

Overall, I am very happy with this item and will update if there are changes.
GUND Rexie T-Rex Dinosaur Stuffed Animal Plush, Blue, 13.5"
GUND Rexie T-Rex Dinosaur Stuffed Animal Plush, Blue, 13.5"
This is an extremely cute dinosaur. It is a nice, bright blue with a lime green tummy. It's hands and toes are in a soft gray. It is a soft plush fur and the filling is so as well (some stuffed toys are overstuffed and end up hard but this one is cuddly.) It has sew on fabric teeth and safety eyes. The dinosaur is hand washable and air dry. I really appreciate that as stuffed toys can get a bit dirty over time.

I recently purchased a much larger version of this Gund dinosaur at a local big box store. It was a different color and different fabric. It was for my grandson to play with when he was at our house. He was really disappointed when it proved too big to fit on his toddler bed, so he let it sit in the chair he uses for reading. I looked for and found this version of the same dinosaur but in a great cuddly, nap size.

He was so happy to have one he could sleep with. The big one is now the daddy and the small one is the baby. He's thrilled with it and so am I!
The Maine Woods: A Fully Annotated Edition
The Maine Woods: A Fully Annotated Edition
"The Maine Woods" is the first American classic and still the best book in the field of naturalism, mainly because Thoreau writes from the perspective of his own safari-experience while at the same time observing plants, animals, birds, insects and topography scientifically. As a scientist his writing is informed by virtually all the books available on New England naturalism in the 1840s. Jeffrey Cramer's notes are especially helpful in tracking Thoreau's scientific sources. As a traveler interacting with others, Thoreau respects the privacy of others while disclosing his personal foibles. As a writer cognizant of history, he puts Ethan Allen in his place (a self-promoter) while comparing his northern trek to Benedict Arnold's more heroic one in 1775. (Cramer falls short in this regard when he cites Arnold's march toward Quebec as a failure.) As a sign of objectivity, Thoreau avoids the knee-jerk reaction to Benedict Arnold as "traitor." He appreciates his Abenaki and Penobscot guides for their expertise. Stylistically this is Thoreau at his best, better than "Walden," perhaps because he is less self-conscious of a need to say something clever.
Lando: The Sacketts, Book 7
Lando: The Sacketts, Book 7
Having read all of the Sackett Series Books several years ago, I decided to read them again. Lando is very much like old Barnabas Sackett, in the description of his body build and his forgiving disposition. In fact, these are two of my favorite characters in the series. When beginning a new book in the series, if these same characters are not mentioned, I miss them as if a long, lost friend has left me forever.

If you have not read any of the Sackett books or watched the t.v. series, Barnabas is basically the beginning of the line. I say this because he was an only child living in the Fins in England prior to boarding a ship to come to, what is now, the United States of America. His father taught him to wrestle, fist fight and how to use a sword. Barnabas passed these skills along to his own sons and they have continued the traditional teachings.

This series is not just for the guys! It is an awesome story of a family line who sets their roots in the new world and how they manage to live off the land and to survive during brutal times. It is a story of love of the land, freedom and then the great love a person has for their spouse. You will want to read and read again over and over this great series of books.

Louis L'Amour has written a tremendous number of books about the land, the people and the sheer determination to survive in a world that was uncivilized when they arrived. What an awesome writer of books! He traveled to the places he has written about and it is evident.
The Daybreakers: The Sacketts, Book 6
The Daybreakers: The Sacketts, Book 6
Not his best and some anomalies with the earlier books in the Sackett series. The first Sackett, Barnabas, came from the Fen country in eastern England in the early 1600s. If Orrin and Tye were descendants it’s hard to see how they’d have had Welsh accents.
However, this was written in 1960 more than ten years before the preceding books and was the first Sackett book he wrote.
There is an error at 23% into the book. Much has been said about Orrin and Tye having no ‘learning’ and having a wish to learn to read and yet Orrin picks up a letter at the burnt out wagons and tells us the victims of the Indian attack had a 16 year old daughter at home.
Great climax to the book as we’ve come to expect from Louis L’Amour
The Sky-Liners: The Sacketts, Book 11
The Sky-Liners: The Sacketts, Book 11
I was glad to (temporarily) leave William Tell Sackett behind but wasn't impressed with Flagan or Galloway either. And, as for Judith... don't get me started. She's the typical snot-nosed teen who wises up toward the end, but she doesn't feel solid or consistent. She starts out spoiled - I was reminded of Orrin's ex, Laura - until she sees Black Fetchen for what he is and comes to her senses; then, Judith becomes this meek, subservient creature proclaiming her love for Flagan. The romance is weak, there's no courtship and little interaction between her and her love, so I didn't buy it. And, because Judith reminded me of Laura, I expected her to be a turncoat, playing the Sacketts for Fetchen's advantage but the story isn't even strong enough to support that plot - ultimately, Judith fades into the background, just another love interest of the Sackett fellas. L'Amour missed an opportunity to give us a strong-female character.

This story is action-packed, especially toward the end. But, I'm still wondering about the horses. Flagan and Galloway are hired to escort Judith and several horses cross-country to Colorado. But the horses are stolen, along with some cows from a traveling cowpoke, and the Sackett boys go off chasing the cows and we never learn what happens to the horses. Nobody - not even Judith or her father, the owners of said horses - ever brings up their missing stock. I was probably supposed to assume that the horses became the horses that Fetchen and his gang rode but I chose to imagine the horses breaking free during one of the battle-scenes, running wild across the plains until some Lakota men (led by Michael and Eddie Spears, haha) rounds them up and rides off into the sunset (but feel free to go your own way with your own imaginings because L'Amour certainly didn't fill in the holes).

In short, the inconsistencies made it difficult for me to suspend my disbelief for this book.
Pop Goes the Weasel (Alex Cross Book 5)
Pop Goes the Weasel (Alex Cross Book 5)
Not as good as "Along Came A Spider" or "Kiss the Girls", but it's a lot better than "Cat & Mouse". Patterson does manage to redeem himself and the Alex Cross series in this next installment, "Pop Goes The Weasel".

The new killer, Geoffrey Shafer, is indeed one of the most terrifying villains since Casanova and Soneji. He takes scariness to a whole new level and really gives Alex a hard time. The romance between Alex and Christine is just beautiful in this novel. I love how they care for each other and love each other. I'm glad that they are getting married. And I know I said this before, but I freaking love Alex's kids in this series. So adorable and cute. And you got to love Nana Mama (the only person who can get away with arguing with Alex and making him angry). For once (even if it is for only the beginning and middle of the story), I'm happy that things are settling down.

But then there are the problems that I have with this story. There are too many sub-plots going on. I mean, the new character, Patsy Hampton, she doesn't fit into this story at all. Even as I character I don't care for her, because I'm still trying to figure out why she is even in this story. There is also a story-plot that involves Geoffrey being involved with three other killers, who call themselves the "Four Horsemen" (which he is one of them). I felt like Patterson could have done more with all four of these killers instead of just mentioning them throughout the story and only having them appear together once, which is the ending. Also, Christine's kidnapping went on for "way" to long in this story and it also feels like a cliché. And while I do kinda like the ending, I felt like Patterson could have done so much better.

"Pop Goes The Weasel" is an okay novel and it does redeem Patterson for his work on "Cat & Mouse", but it doesn't hold up for what made "Along Came A Spider", "Kiss the Girls", and "Jack & Jill" so good. The beginning and most of the middle really had me going, but it is the final part of the story that didn't sit well with me. If you are a fan of the Alex Cross series, then maybe you might like this one.
Triple Threat (BookShots)
Triple Threat (BookShots)
Book Shots is Patterson’s way of keeping himself as the leader of crime mystery. You can tell which parts his co-writer has written but it’s almost seamless. The characters are well developed, and you can’t help liking the protagonist despite what he has done.
English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (Excluding Drama) (Oxford History of English Literature) by C. S. Lewis (1954-12-01)
English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (Excluding Drama) (Oxford History of English Literature) by C. S. Lewis (1954-12-01)
In response to Amazon software's failure to carry over reviews to other offerings of the same book, I'm reposting one of my older reviews with some changes. (I wrote it in 2003, and then expanded it in 2005). It may wind up elsewhere, thanks to the same software -- in which case I can only accept the dictates of Heaven....

C.S. Lewis's "English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (Excluding Drama)," was first published in 1954, as an installment in the Clark Lectures series (for 1944), which contributes an additional subtitle in some listings, but primarily as part of a multi-volume "Oxford History of English Literature." It is perhaps the most most distinguished contribution to latter (but see below). It certainly seems to have been its top seller, and was at one time available in paperback (see picture of cover). Instead of the usual solemn catalogue of dates, names, and received critical opinions, Lewis had delivered a witty, sometimes impassioned, re-assessment of the Golden Age of English literature -- a conventional phrase which he turned into a technical term for later Elizabethan "Golden Style."

Oh yes; he did include all those dates and names, and a lot of comments on what he thought was wrong with the received opinions of the past and present (that being roughly the 1930s).

Inevitably, the response from fellow academics was not a chorus of approval. But it is obvious that many of them read it with care, even if some of them did tend to take the little jokes and apparent paradoxes too seriously. For example a critic claimed to be puzzled that Lewis argued that a writer who claimed a retelling of a very old story as entirely his own invention, in the hope of increased sales for the publisher, would for the same reason misrepresent an original story as a translation. Lewis wasn't discussing plagiarism as a moral or a psychological issue, but illustrating responses to the new economics of publishing (instead of patronage) in a particular case (that of Thomas Lodge).

For reasons not immediately apparent, Oxford University Press reissued this book at the beginning of the 1990s in a "New Version" with the title "Poetry and Prose in the Sixteenth Century." As the same fate has overtaken E. K. Chambers on "English Literature at the Close of the Middle Ages," probably the other outstanding book in the series, which is now called "Malory and Fifteenth-Century Drama, Lyrics, and Ballads," there seems to have been a policy of titular refurbishing of at least some of the volumes in the series (once known, in an unfortunate acronym, as the O.H.E.L.).

The new titles are accurate, although "Poetry and Prose" should have included the old warning that Elizabethan drama was covered in a different volume. (Due to the facts of human biology, Lewis' book not unexpectedly covers a slightly longer period than either title indicates.) Still, the changes can cause confusion for anyone not aware of them; given the current prices, this may be more than a little annoying to some people. If you have one version, you probably don't need the other!

Lewis on the "Sixteenth Century" was the product of enormous labor, including actually reading a huge body of writing generally ignored in literary histories, or customarily treated without much firsthand knowledge. Acquaintances -- not all of them friends, or even especially sympathetic -- described Lewis spending his days doggedly reading sermons and polemics, minor poets and bad poets, over the course of years. (He came to refer to the effort by the "infernal" acronym for the series noted above.) The result is a treasury of first-hand information, and with it Lewis' often-idiosyncratic summations. It is engaging reading, even for those who frequently disagree with Lewis - and, as noted, he seemingly set out to overturn most critical orthodoxies established between about 1900 and 1940, as well as older ones.

For example, he treats Elizabethan literature as an extension of medieval culture. Humanism, in its period sense of concern for a classicizing Latin style, and the disparaging of the immediate past, is treated as an often-harmful interruption. This reverses a judgment that actually goes back to the period -- but a judgment originally made by self-styled Humanists themselves, of course. And he very much includes the literature of Lowland Scotland, often ignored, or treated as something apart.

When "English Literature in the Sixteenth Century" appeared as an Oxford paperback, under the original title, in 1973), it lacked the bibliographic supplement in which Lewis discussed textual histories and modern editions, if any, of both the well-known and the more obscure English and Scots literature of the late fifteenth through early seventeenth centuries. This portion is, of course, now over half a century out of date, but Lewis' observations are still of value. Even without this section, the paperback is worthwhile, and may be a good, reasonably-priced, alternative, but anyone familiar with the original form may be disappointed.

Those interested in Lewis as a Christian apologist will find here his considered reflections on many of his predecessors, not all of them flattering, but his comments on doctrine are pretty strictly limited to explaining the issues debated. It may seem odd to see the Reformation through the lenses of literary history, but Lewis avoids open advocacy, unlike his "Preface to 'Paradise Lost,'" in which (it seems to me) his concern that readers take Milton seriously tends to blend with a concern that they take seriously their own salvation.

Lewis was also a poet, novelist, and occasional short-story writer. Here he occasionally briefly retells a story, with his usual skill, but, except for some overlapping topics, connections to his own fiction are less obvious than in some of his writings on the Middle Ages. There is a section on the Scots poet Sir David Lyndsay (d. 1555), who provided the epigraph to Lewis' novel "That Hideous Strength" (1946). And it includes, as others have noted also, a quotation with the words "Stygian puddle glum." This undoubtedly lurks somewhere behind both the Marshwiggle named Puddleglum and the visit to the Narnian Underlands in "The Silver Chair" (1953, written 1950), although Dante, Virgil (of course), and a host of others, are under contribution there as well.

I was under the impression, from my first reading of the book decades ago, that it was given as a quotation from Gavin Douglas' Scots translation of "The Aeneid" (1513; Lewis describes it with enthusiasm); but I had never been able to locate it in the appropriate section. A search of my old copy of the shorter paperback eventually revealed that it was indeed quoted from a translation, but as an example of bad one, and English, not Scots; of the dramas of Seneca, not Virgil. (Oh well, at least it was Latin....) On page 256 (where I had marked it in pencil thirty years earlier), there it was: "Tacitae Stygis" in "Hippolytus" (line 625), rather weakly rendered by the utterly obscure John Studley ("which cannot now be read without a smile").

Perhaps establishing just how much Lewis read, and with what close attention, no matter how dreary.
Split Second / The Christmas Train Omnibus
Split Second / The Christmas Train Omnibus
Zwar spannend, aber leider viel zu unglaubwürdig (ein bisschen ist es immer, aber zu viel ist zu viel). Leichte Kost.
Christmas train hane ich nach ein paar Seiten gelangweilt weggelegt.
Strange News from Another Star and Other Tales (English and German Edition)
Strange News from Another Star and Other Tales (English and German Edition)
These are some of the most spiritually awakened stories I have ever read. Fairy tales for grown ups, yet truly insightful and remarkable literature. I recommend these stories to everyone without reservation. Hesse is not just for teenagers with unfulfilled religious needs and spiritual curiosity. Read them!
Exiled: Clan of the Claw (Exiled Series Book 1)
Exiled: Clan of the Claw (Exiled Series Book 1)
Mantiene le sue promesse, questa antologia basata su un universo condiviso dove l'evoluzione ha preso una piega ben insolita, contrapponendo un popolo felinoide alla ricerca di nuove terre ed un popolo di sauridi che non vogliono accettare la coesistenza.
Un tema che oggi è più che mai attuale, qui sviluppato con grande maestria e senza faziosità.
Return of the Magi: A heartwarming Christmas story
Return of the Magi: A heartwarming Christmas story
First Sentence: Emil Rice was snuggled in the back seat of his mom’s car under a fuzzy blanket printed with Marvel Comics superheroes, watching the dark countryside roll by through the frosty window.

Emil Rice is a charming man and a very bad thief as he’s been caught 22 times. In fact, his parole officer, Harry Foster, runs a betting pool on how quickly Emil will be re-arrested. However, on Emil’s 23rd arrest the judge doesn’t send him back to jail but sentences him to community service at a secure mental health facility where he is befriended by Gloria and Edith, two elderly women who see Emil is the final piece of a life-changing plan.

For those who appreciate descriptions that provide a strong sense of place, Tracy satisfies that need—"It was a clear, bitter night—the kind that made your ears and eyes and teeth hurt—but the moon was full in the sky, with freckles of bright stars scattered around its happy face, smiling an apology for the brittle temperature.”

Beginning with Emil as a boy, all the characters are wonderful. Whether lead or supporting, they are fully developed. Yet it’s also a delight to watch them change and grow.

Tracy’s humor is subtle—“Gloria put the teddy bear by his head and pressed the Bible into his hands. ‘Read Matthew chapter two, verses one through eleven. Don’t bother to read John. We think he might have been just a little psychotic.’”—and balanced by the ability to convey emotion—“Foster clicked off and stared at his silly tree, the presents stacked along its green skirt of branches, and felt all the happiness leaking out of him.”

“The Return of the Magi” is an unexpectedly delightful story. It is not overly sentimental but does make one think of the stories by O. Henry. It warms one heart and makes one think of there always being possibilities.

RETURN OF THE MAGI (Holiday Story-Emil Rice-Nevada-Contemp) - Ex
Tracy, P.J. – eBook Novella
Penguin – Nov, 2017
2 Sets Thicken Adjustable Balloon Column Stand Kit Base and Pole 5 Feet Balloon Tower Decorations for Baby Shower Graduation Birthday Wedding Party
2 Sets Thicken Adjustable Balloon Column Stand Kit Base and Pole 5 Feet Balloon Tower Decorations for Baby Shower Graduation Birthday Wedding Party
I was going to build a stand for the tower and good ole Amazon had this pop up in my search. This was my first time doing this and having the rings you attach the ballon to was great. The plastic is not the best but works. I would not recommend this for outdoor use but inside it was great. I didn’t add water to the base which I should have because it keep falling over.
Aurora - Shaun The Sheep - 11" Shaun The Sheep Small Plush, White
Aurora - Shaun The Sheep - 11" Shaun The Sheep Small Plush, White
If your child is anything like mine stuck in this quarantine, we have Netflix binged Shaun the Sheep until my roommate threatened to move out from lack on concentration on anything else except the theme song. Needless to say, “Netflix says that show is broken and to say they are sorry they sent Shaun to keep you company” and voila, Shaun came to stay with us. Best quarantine buy.

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