Otto Cox

Joined a year ago

Otto's Favorites
HTML、CSS和JavaScript入门经典(第2版)
HTML、CSS和JavaScript入门经典(第2版)
HTML、CSS和JavaScript入门经典(第2版) by Meloni) [美]朱莉,梅洛尼(Julie. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
Modular Programming with JavaScript
Modular Programming with JavaScript
Modular Programming with JavaScript by Sasan Seydnejad. Rated 3.5 out of 5 stars, with 2 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the javascript category.
CSS Cookbook
CSS Cookbook
CSS Cookbook by Christopher Schmitt and Dan Cederholm. Rated 2.9 out of 5 stars, with 18 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the css category.
PHP and MySQL 24-Hour Trainer
PHP and MySQL 24-Hour Trainer
PHP and MySQL 24-Hour Trainer by Andrea Tarr. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 18 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the mysql category.
点点星光灿烂
点点星光灿烂
点点星光灿烂 by 郭艳红. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the mysql category.
The Little Library Cookbook
The Little Library Cookbook
The Little Library Cookbook by Kate Young. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 41 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
Consultant
Consultant
Consultant by Sean Tyler. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars, with 3 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Une seconde chance (French Edition)
Une seconde chance (French Edition)
Une seconde chance (French Edition) by Nicholas Sparks and Jean-Noël Chatain. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 19 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
After Work
After Work
After Work by Simona Ahrnstedt, Vera Teltz, et al.. Rated 3.6 out of 5 stars, with 11 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
A Cruel Madness
A Cruel Madness
A Cruel Madness by Colin Thubron. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 5 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
The Shotgun Lawyer
The Shotgun Lawyer
The Shotgun Lawyer by Victor Methos. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 767 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Rainbow Six
Rainbow Six
Rainbow Six by Tom Clancy, Michael Prichard, et al.. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 1468 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Java Programming: Basic of Java Programming
Java Programming: Basic of Java Programming
Java Programming: Basic of Java Programming by Vishwajit Barbuddhe, Shraddha N. Zanjat, et al.. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Linux-based Web Programming PHP Web Development (with CD)
Linux-based Web Programming PHP Web Development (with CD)
Linux-based Web Programming PHP Web Development (with CD) by LIU ZHEN YAN ?WANG YONG ?CHEN LI PING BIAN ZHU. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Coding for Beginners Using Python
Coding for Beginners Using Python
Coding for Beginners Using Python by Louie Stowell. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 91 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Python programming' category.
Mastering Python High Performance
Mastering Python High Performance
Mastering Python High Performance by Fernando Doglio. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 5 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Python programming' category.
KOTLIN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE: AN OUTLINE
KOTLIN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE: AN OUTLINE
KOTLIN PROGRAMMING LANGUAGE: AN OUTLINE by KRANTHI KUMAR and CURIOSITY PUBLISHERS. Rated 1 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Kotlin programming category.
Kotlin em ação (Portuguese Edition)
Kotlin em ação (Portuguese Edition)
Kotlin em ação (Portuguese Edition) by Dmitry Jemerov and Svetlana Isakova. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 16 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Kotlin programming category.
ViVa (Cummings Typescript Editions)
ViVa (Cummings Typescript Editions)
ViVa (Cummings Typescript Editions) by E. E. Cummings. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the TypeScript category.
Aleister Crowley : SIGNED Letters, Diaries, Documents, Manuscripts, Typescripts, Calling Cards, Horoscopes, etc. - Various Items Owned By, or Passed Through the Hands of The Beast 666.
Aleister Crowley : SIGNED Letters, Diaries, Documents, Manuscripts, Typescripts, Calling Cards, Horoscopes, etc. - Various Items Owned By, or Passed Through the Hands of The Beast 666.
Aleister Crowley : SIGNED Letters, Diaries, Documents, Manuscripts, Typescripts, Calling Cards, Horoscopes, etc. - Various Items Owned By, or Passed Through the Hands of The Beast 666. by Aleister Crowley, The Master Therion, et al.. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the TypeScript category.
Warren Buffett: The Life, Lessons & Rules for Success
Warren Buffett: The Life, Lessons & Rules for Success
There is nothing worthwhile reading in this entire book. I have read many financial books, including biographies of well known investors. This book reads like a sloppy wikipedia article (seemed like it was seriously written at a 2nd grade reading level). There are only a handful of facts about Warren's early life that keep getting repeated over and over. The "life lessons" are cliche after cliche with no concrete or truly inspirational ideas. Moreover, there is no author or publisher even listed within the entire book. This is clearly some sort of scam book haphazardly put together to earn a few bucks by enticing people to buy it by putting Warren Buffett's picture on the cover. Save your money, read his wikipedia page for more detailed history, and buy a real book about Warren Buffett.
Becoming Facebook: The 10 Challenges That Defined the Company That's Disrupting the World
Becoming Facebook: The 10 Challenges That Defined the Company That's Disrupting the World
A decade ago if I wanted to tell people about a good book I’d read, I’d write a review on Amazon and post a link to it on some forums I’m active on. Today, it never really occurred to post a review of Mike Hoefflinger terrific new book Becoming Facebook on Amazon. Sure I’ll eventually get around to posting this on Amazon but it’s pretty low priority. This says volumes about the importance of Facebook today, and also why this is an important book for people to read.

Mike is uniquely qualified to write this book. Bruce Schechter and I first meet Mike back in early 94, when he was talent computer chip designer at Intel. We were forming Intel’s first online marketing and Mike was already a web/internet fanatic. He taught us how the net worked, he made us read SnowCrash. and soon we spread out across Intel preaching the gospel. THE INTERNET CHANGES EVERYTHING YOU HAVE TO START WORKING ON THE INTERNET NOW!!!!!. Now, mind you this is one year before Amazon shipped its first book or any internet company you’ve ever heard of existed. The next year, Intel’s legendary CEO Andy Grove got the internet religion and our jobs got much easier. Shortly afterward Andy, picked Mike as his technical assistant because he knew more about the net than anybody in the company. In Jan 2009 joined Facebook as VP of global marketing working for COO Sheryl Sandberg, and closely with Mark Zuckerberg. As an engineer turned marketing exec, Mike is able to explain both how Facebook works as a platform and as a business. He is also a mighty fine writer and a good storyteller.
If you are doing business, you almost certainly should be advertising or at least experimenting with Facebook ads. Mike explains how advertising in Facebook works in a way which should help you make your FBs ads more effective. This is also a great book for entrepreneurs. Managing a hypergrowth environment, in the world most dynamic industry is embedded in Facebooks DNA. Each chapter leads off with a lesson, Facebook’s solution, and a question the entrepreneur should be asking. Finally, you should read this book if you want to get a behind the scene look at this thing that a billion of us spend an hour a day using, and get a glimpse of its future.

The book is divided into four parts. Setting the Scene, 10 challenges on the road to becoming Facebook, the Future, and Parting thoughts.

The heart of the book is the 10 challenges/chapters. Some like how Mark Zuckerberg turned down a billion offer from Yahoo when Facebook was an also-ran, are a perfect example of why we aren’t billionaires and Mark is. Others, like how Facebook grows are applicable to any business. Does everyone in the organization understand your mission, what your core product values are, and how you measure success?
Some of the most interesting chapters to me were the technology for making the Facebook application so fast in multiple dimensions. From the software and hardware behind making sure the Beyonce’s life stream isn’t lagging for millions, to making sure that my friends get to see popular pictures of my huge furry cats with no waiting. The process beyond continually enhanced the Facebook experience was also fascinating.
The biggest ah-ha moment for me in the book was understanding how Facebook advertising works. From the beginning, advertising has always been in conflict with the consumer. It doesn’t matter if its the annoying inserts in the Sunday paper, or the 10 minutes of ads in the last 5 minutes of the football games, pop-ups on the web, or the 15-second ads before a YouTube video. By having a keen understanding of what it is users like and dislike, Facebook is able to insert ads into a user's newsfeeds, that are at worse benign and in some cases actually perceived as valuable to the user. For example, I’m going be getting a new cell phone in a month or so, I expect FB to give me a lot of ads for cell phones, which is just fine. This turns out to be a win-win for consumers and advertisers. Those people who are concerned about the information tech companies have about you won’t be comforted by the chapters.

However, they may be comforted by the Facebook mission to connect all the people of the world and the obvious dedication and passion Zuckerburg has to make it happen. It is really remarkable the amount of money and management attention FB has devoted to trying to connect the poor of the world in India, Africa, and Asia. At some point the world’s poorest maybe profitable for FB, but that is likely to be decades away. It is a remarkable long-term vision, akin to Elon Musk’s goal of making humans a multi-planet species.

Interspersed throughout the chapters, Mike talks about the people behind of Facebook. This is the one area where I think the book fell short. Mike does an excellent job demonstrating that in no way is Mark Zuckerberg an accidental billionaire, as others have called him. Instead, he possesses a maturity well beyond his years, a rare insight into both people and products, and the courage of his convictions. But perhaps because Zuckerburg lacks the large than life personality of somebody like Steve Jobs (aka being a huge jerk), I didn’t really get a feel for what Zuckerberg is like. As for the rest of the Facebook staff, I appreciate that company is filled with a ton of certified (e.g. Ph.D.) smart folks who work really hard, but they ended up being interchangeable to me.

My favorite chapter was about the future. The Facebook of ten years from now, much less twenty years will be a radically different experience. The combination of Virtual Reality and augmented reality, along with artificial intelligence all combined with Facebook deep knowledge of our preferences, will not only pamper us when want to be but constantly challenge us to move outside of our bubble and experience different viewpoints and different experiences. I can hardly wait.

The penultimate chapter is something that would only happen in a book written by Silicon Valley insider in a place that celebrates failures. It is a laundry list of all the things Facebook has tried to do and failed miserably at. I loved it. Embracing failure is the most important piece of Silicon Valley DNA that rest of the world needs.

Becoming Facebook isn't a beach read, but it is a book that after you finish, you'll find yourself saying "wow I never knew that".
The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond
The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond
3.5 Stars

This is a sturdy hardcover (with a neat textured cover) almost 200 page book. The color page layouts are nicely done and visually attractive with plenty of high quality historical photographs. There are detailed illustrated diagrams of rockets, space shuttles, the International Space Station, and spacesuits.

There’s a brief overview of the solar system and aviation history before the book covers notable figures (and animals) in the drive to first go into space, then the moon, and in the future Mars (the text dives into assumption and speculation there). It also covers topics of technology, space related jobs, pop culture, and more.

While there are occasional mentions of budgets and the price of a mission and tourist trip, it could have been more informative to include additional price specifics and discussions of the cost factor. This would be one example where the narrative seems to downplay certain angles, thus not always presenting a balanced presentation of the subject material. The message is success rather than an accurate or well-rounded portrayal of the advances and setbacks of the space programs.

There is an index and glossary, which adds to its educational value. Despite a few of the book’s shortcomings, as a homeschooling parent, I still plan to use it in the coming school year with my fourth grader for a unit on space exploration and space history.

Additional analysis on content:

PROS:
While the space program started out a male exclusive program, the book includes pages detailing the women who faced additional obstacles as they paved the way for the program to become more equal opportunity. It was also nice to see attention given to “quiet heroes,” people with behind the scenes jobs that are also critical to the success of the program.

There’s an interesting spread devoted to “space junk,” which details the potential impact of trash and debris left from space missions.

There’s also an informative spread on space age technologies used to improve life on Earth.

CONS:
Space shuttle tragedies (the ’86 Challenger and ’03 Columbia) only get a small sidebar with absolutely no discussion of the incidents and their impacts. It’s clearly downplayed and a glaring omission considering both halted and curbed the program. As someone who sat in elementary school with her classmates ready to watch a teacher instruct from space for the first time only to witness the explosion on live TV, this certainly warranted more book coverage.

In the section “Why Space?” it attributes space exploration to curiosity. This is often a term used in history books to describe exploration (and colonization) on Earth to kids, and in both instances the real drive rarely boils down to simple curiosity. In fact, I cringed every time the word was not only tossed out but given so much weight. While knowledge, education, and scientific discovery are also a part of it, children shouldn’t be misled that there aren’t other material and ideological motivations for the space program and space exploration.

Ironically, later in the book, space discovery (as well as Neil Armstrong and Yuri Gagarin) is compared to “pioneer” Christopher Columbus, reinforcing age old hero myth-making, inaccurately crediting him as the inspiration for ocean travel, once again ignoring the less noble reasons for exploration. (Neil and Yuri should be rolling over in their graves at the analogy painting them in the same boat as Chris.)

Interestingly, while the narrative seems to keep a running score card on the space accomplishments between the US and Soviet Union, there is no mention or discussion of Reagan’s controversial Strategic Defense Initiative or “Star Wars” program.
Elon Musk: Como o CEO bilionário da SpaceX e da Tesla está moldando o nosso futuro (Portuguese Edition)
Elon Musk: Como o CEO bilionário da SpaceX e da Tesla está moldando o nosso futuro (Portuguese Edition)
Como uma pessoa considerada por muitos arrogante, que humilha e não sabe lidar com seus funcionários, consegue despertar admiração dos mesmos e inspirar uma geração?

Isto foi o que fiquei me perguntando enquanto lia este livro. E cheguei a conclusão que dois pontos foram de suma importância: O propósito de vida muito bem definido de Musk alinhado com seu desejo de fazê-lo da melhor forma possível, saindo do 'mais do mesmo'.

Elon tem muito bem definido qual seu objetivo na vida e não perde o foco do seu propósito. Suas ações estão sempre alinhadas aos seus pensamentos de longo prazo e ele não mede esforços para conseguir o que quer.

Como se já não bastasse pensar grande, Musk revolucionou o modo tradicional com que as coisas estavam sendo realizadas. Ele poderia seguir a maré e construir foguetes ou carros no padrão que a indústria estava acostumada a fazer, seria bem mais fácil, mas ele entendia que os processos poderiam ser melhorados e muito, e sua inteligência e dedicação mostrou que ele estava certo.
Radical Simplicity: How Simplicity Transformed a Loss-Making Mega Brand into a World-Class Performer
Radical Simplicity: How Simplicity Transformed a Loss-Making Mega Brand into a World-Class Performer
I couldn't put this book down! Part autobiography, part leadership manifesto, in this easy-to-read book Ken Allen shares his SELF Reflection philosophy of Leadership that produced one of the greatest turnarounds in corporate history. Most strategies fail because they're too complicated or because of poor implementation. He says you cannot run a large organisation such as DHL from behind a desk. You've got to get out and about and engage with your people. Ken puts employees at the centre of building a successful organisation. However, not symbolically as many Leaders do. Instead, he turns the front-line into heroes! Ken walks his talk and sets the bar very high for other leaders who aspire to do great things! A worthy read!
Uncommon Friends: Life with Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Alexis Carrel, and Charles Lindbergh
Uncommon Friends: Life with Thomas Edison, Henry Ford, Harvey Firestone, Alexis Carrel, and Charles Lindbergh
This book originally caught my eye as an addition to another book I read called Edison: A Life of Invention by Paul Israel. I wanted a book that would cover a little more of Edison's personal life, and this book did just that. However, James Newton's close, dedicated friendships with all of these twentieth century icons is truly amazing, and I learned more than I would probably learn otherwise about some of these important historical figures.

The entire book is fascinating, and surely different parts will appeal to different readers. I was particularly enchanted with a poignant description of how Charles Lindbergh handled dying as he lay on his deathbed. I was also fascinated with how environmentally conscientious some of these men were, particularly Edison and Lindbergh, but also Ford. For example, Ford was very interested in making automobile parts out of soybeans in order to reduce the need for metal parts. It seems that all of these men had numerous ideas and ideas for inventions that were way ahead of their time - perhaps some of them still are.

Newton's writing is quite good, and I only have one very minor criticism: it seems that he preaches a little bit and dwells on the religious facet of his relationships with these people. Of course, I'm sure this was a very important part of his relationship with these men and their families, but it seems that he has a grand, overarching agenda via constantly illustrating their connection to God and religion.

If you are interested in any of these historical figures and their fascinating relationships with each other, this book is definitely the best book you will find on the subject.
Donald Trump Make 4th of July Great Again Men's Tank Top Patriotic Singlet
Donald Trump Make 4th of July Great Again Men's Tank Top Patriotic Singlet
This is a cute-ish tank top. I just like silly shirts like this when I'm at the lake, and this is fitting for the 4th of July. I'm a female. This is a guys tank top (obviously). I bought a small. The are openings are a little big, so some side boob shows. I plan on wearing a bandeau type bra or another slimmer tank top underneath. I'm 5'4" 140lb-ish (give or take 1-2 lbs) and my pant size is a 28 or size 6. The quality of this shirt is better than I was expecting, honestly. I haven't washed it yet, so not sure how it will come out, but I'm hopeful it will be just fine.
In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives
In the Plex: How Google Thinks, Works, and Shapes Our Lives
This book holistically explores the history and various products of Google Inc. The book’s significance comes from Levy’s ongoing access to various Google employees, attendance at company events and product discussions, and other Google-related cultural and business elements since the company’s inception in 1999. In essence, Levy provides us with a superb – if sometimes favourably biased – account of Google’s growth and development.

The book covers Google’s successes, failures, and difficulties as it grew from a graduate project at Stanford University to the multi-billion dollar business it is today. Throughout we see just how important algorithmic learning and automation is; core to Google’s business philosophy is that using humans to rank or evaluate things “was out of the question. First, it was inherently impractical. Further, humans were unreliable. Only algorithms – well drawn, efficiently executed, and based on sound data – could deliver unbiased results” (p. 16). This attitude of the ‘pure algorithm’ is pervasive; translation between languages is just an information problem that can – through suitable algorithms – accurately and effectively translate even the cultural uniqueness that is linked to languages. Moreover, when Google’s search algorithms routinely display anti-Semitic websites after searching for “Jew” the founders refused to modify the search algorithms because the algorithms had “spoke” and “Brin’s ideals, no matter how heartfelt, could not justify intervention. “I feel like I shouldn’t impose my beliefs on the world,” he said. “It’s a bad technology practice”" (p. 275). This is an important statement: the founders see the product of human mathematical ingenuity as non-human and lacking bias born of their human creation.

This conception of the ‘pure’ and ‘good’ algorithm that is devoid of human bias drove the aesthetic development of the Google’s products line, insofar as “the message Google wanted to convey was that its products had no human bias” (p. 207). Calling their mobile operating system Android is clearly linked with this popular conception: the device is distinct from humanity and independent of it past creation; creation itself (seemingly) is not seen as establishing particular narratives, biases, ethics, or other determining contingencies. Similar conceptions drove the naming of Google’s web browser, Chrome.

Though the algorithm might be seen as pure, actions surrounding those mathematical equations and code are often wrapped in ethical and political questions inside of the company. Ethical questions arose when the GMail team discussed inserting ads based on data mining email. There were strong worries at Google that this behaviour was “just going to be creepy and weird”, though the company’s founders “were really entranced by it . . . We felt like, ‘Wow, something was mentioned in my email and I actually got an ad that was relevant!’ That was amazing. We thought that was a great thing.” As for the potential blowback, Brin says, “We didn’t give it a second thought. There were plenty of things to question, but I never batted an eyelash at that. It never occurred to me as a privacy thing” (p. 170-1). This issue of privacy, highlighted in the middle of the book, returns with a fury towards the conclusion when Levy examines Google’s involvement with the Federal Trade Commission (FTC).

In Levy’s discussion of the DoubleClick acquisition we learn a great deal about Google’s corporate behaviours. The FTC investigated the potential implications of DoubleClick’s acquisition and ultimately permitted Google’s purchase. After explaining, in quite some depth, the significance of Google’s potential acquisition of the company Levy writes that the FTC investigation “failed to perceive the admittedly complicated privacy implications that were unique in this case. For its part, Google helped foment misunderstanding by not being clear about the unprecedented benefits it would gain in tracking consumer behaviour . . . the DoubleClick cookie provided a potentially voluminous amount of information about its users and their interests, virtually all of it compiled by stealth” (p. 333). While Google’s actions here are not terribly surprising – we somewhat cynically expect companies to struggle to increase their revenues within the confines of the law – they are telling: DoubleClick’s acquisition was key to Google’s continuing dominance of the online advertising marketshare and, as such, if government couldn’t find out it was coming to a bad conclusion then Google wasn’t going to help correct that conclusion.

Questions of ethics also arose around the problem of video-based copyright infringement. Key people at Google felt, and presumably still feel, that such infringement “when you come right down to it” is “evil” (p. 229). Similarly there were serious questions around what is an inappropriate degree of censorship to incorporate into the company’s Search product, questions that were prominently raised not just when Eric Schmidt tried (and failed) to remove some search results about himself but also when Google entered the Chinese search market.

Indeed, it is the many-page account of Google’s troubles in China that are amongst the most important – and revealing – in Levy’s book. To begin, from the book we discover that there were intense debates within Google about the appropriateness of even doing business in the country, with the company’s chief policy directory Andrew McLaughlin strongly arguing against launching business in China. McLaughlin lost the argument but, upon entering the Chinese market, another problem arose for Google: a cult culture arose around the Googler in charge of China, Kai-Fu, which was seen as very ‘non-Googley’. There were also culturally-driven missteps, including gifts that were (mis)perceived as bribes and other cross-cultural frictions.

These cultural issues, however, paled in the face of determining what the company would censor in their Search products. Specifically, there was a problem in “determining what information should not be given to Chinese users. Though the government demanded censorship, it didn’t hand out a complete list of what wasn’t allowed. Following the law required self-censorship, with the implicit risk that if a company failed to block information that the Chinese government didn’t want its citizens to see, it could lose its license.” To deal with the problem Google examined and probed “the sites of competitors, such as China’s top search engine, Baidu, testing them with risky keywords and see what they blocked” (280). This was seen as both technically and politically (and, perhaps, ethically) savvy: Google itself would not engage in censorship beyond the censorship that already existed in the Chinese market.

This process of navigating the Chinese business, cultural, and censorial environment forced Google to establish differing security permissions between their North American and Chinese operations. It wasn’t that the company’s executives didn’t trust their Chinese engineers but that “when you go to a place like China, there’s lots of examples of companies where intellectual property has gone out the door.” Moreover, the company’s engineering director was “concerned that employees in China who were Chinese nationals might be asked by government officials to disclose personal information, and all our access policies derived from that” (p. 301). So, in essence, it wasn’t that Google was necessarily worried about specific engineers but about the social situation and governmental pressures that could be applied to engineers, and thus affect their behaviour and actions.

While Google worried about data exfiltration by employees, it established even more extensive security precautions after some of its Beijing employees succumbed to spearphishing. The consequence of this successful attack was the theft of confidential security code. Though Levy’s book just offers a brief account of the attack on Gaia, Google’s master password system, it succinctly draws together the body of public writing on the topic and boils that writing down in terms that the layperson can both appreciate and understand. This data was subsequently used to gather information about Chinese dissidents who used Google’s products: Google, though being compromised, acted as a boon to the Chinese state in its efforts to surveil and suppress dissenting members of its population.

In the end, this book is incredibly useful for anyone interested in corporate growth, privacy, or corporate-government relations. It’s also, obviously, of interest to “Google-watchers”. Levy has brought significant insights to how Google developed and why certain paths and decisions were chosen over others. He is routinely attentive to the ‘big picture’, or how Google’s services interact with one another and with the world. Though not covered in the review, there are interesting bits and pieces around the company’s relationship with telecommunications carriers and spectrum policy, hardware development, business secrecy, and other topics sure to interest policymakers, scholars, business readers, and the generally interested member of the public. Without any doubt, this is one of the ‘must buy’ books about big data, big corporations, and one of the biggest information giants that collects and controls vast amount of the world’s information.
Aretha Franklin: The Queen of Soul (Celebrating Black Artists)
Aretha Franklin: The Queen of Soul (Celebrating Black Artists)
Aretha Franklin: The Queen of Soul (Celebrating Black Artists) by Charlotte Etinde-Crompton and Samuel Willard Crompton. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Aretha Franklin" category.
"louis armstrong ella fitzgerald"
"louis armstrong ella fitzgerald"
There is no match better than Louis and Ella! This collection is pure magic and joy, perfect for dispelling the dark news of today. Put on your dancing shoes, and get ready to be schooled in joyful jazz!
Bob Dylan for Clawhammer Banjo
Bob Dylan for Clawhammer Banjo
This is a book full of excellently done tabs for Bob Dylan in clawhammer banjo. The way the songs are tabbed out don't make it seem like the songs were "forced" into the necessary pattern for clawhammer style, they're all in standard tunings (G, D, Double C, and all along the watchtower is in D minor), and different rhythms that are great fun and fit inductively to the natural "bum ditty" groove of clawhammer. Rather, the tabs make it seem like the songs were meant to be played this way. Most tunes are easy enough for the intermediate player to work through, and to entertain fully the advanced player. Playing claw hammer banjo can get a little repetitive when all you're playing are folk tunes that all sound quite similar, and I found this book to be a great change of pace while staying true to the clawhammer style. I can't recommend this book enough for anybody who likes to play clawhammer banjo.
Pixel 4 - Clearly White - 64GB - Unlocked
Pixel 4 - Clearly White - 64GB - Unlocked
Leaks and early reviews made people know what was coming and the few details we were missing were a disappointment. Google justifies that a telephoto it's more useful than an ultra wide but when you are joining the big league of flagships you give customers the options that the market offers and in this case I think that the wide angle omission was a big miss. This and the surprise of a smaller battery compared to last year's pixel are the drawbacks that I wanted to get out of the way first.

The battery is not great as people expected and on my two day use, I have had around 4 hours of screen on time. I feel like this is making a big favor to goole, and in no way this is a justification, but my smaller battery has made me rethink that probably being on my phone for 4 hours and being stressed about it is probably something I could improve and adjust on my personal time management. Normal phone use with camera use every once in a while is achievable for sure with the regular pixel 4. For me the trade-off of a smaller battery but a more manageable body compared to the XL is worth it.

To combat the lack of wide angle, I luckily had a moment wide angle lens I used on my pixel 2 that I did not get rid off when I got my S10e. I can confidently say the convenience of having the lens on the phone is great, but in case of the Samsung lens the quality dropped from the main lens to the wide angle and using the awesome lens from moment doesn't decrease the quality or adds any distortion to the main lens. Having moment announce the support of the Pixel 4 gives me a wide angle and basically convert my two lens to the ideal 3 lens scenario we all wanted. I seriously recommend the products and content Moment has to anyone interested in photography.

Now for the good stuff, Pixel 4 shines in what I expected and made me come back for a pixel. I went from Nexus 6p- Samsung s8 and Pixel 2 - Samsung s10 and both times I kept missing my Google phone. If rellying on a camera that will ALWAYS deliver a great photo is something you value, I don't think there is a better option than Pixel. It's more difficult to take a bad photo than it is to take GREAT one. The lack of original quality cloud backup is a bit sour, but you can still back them on a good enough quality, considering most people just like to go back and see their photos on their phones and not for a big print out where amazing quality is required. The price of Google one is also reasonable and gives enough space for original quality backup.

Lastly, the screen and 90hz screen are the cherry on top of this cake. If you use your phone, you need to unlock it so having something that makes this process go this smooth because of the early waking up of the phone from the radar to scan for your face it's really wonderful. The 90hz helps on another side of our everyday use equation : scrolling CONSTANTLY. The difference is noticeable and it's something I know I will get used to. As with many other things and features, it's one of the little things techlovers appreciate and other consumers just don't care about.

There is no perfect phone but Pixel constantly proved for me that there's no match for their camera and having the best Android experience is what you get. With this year's Pixel 4 you get that plus an awesome clean and finally finger print free construction, a superb pair of speakers that do not make me miss the front firing speakers of the Pixel 2 and some nifty features that scratch my geek technology itch.
The Lord of the Rings The Fellowship of the Ring: Piano/Vocal/Chords
The Lord of the Rings The Fellowship of the Ring: Piano/Vocal/Chords
At a family reunion recently, I heard my nephews playing some beautiful piano music from "Lord of the Rings" and the cover of the book they had looked like this one. In sorting through the arrangements to purchase (many with identical covers), and after studying the reviews, I selected "soundtrack piano", thinking this would be the most challenging and interesting arrangement-- most like the film soundtrack as is possible on a piano. I was a music education major in college, so I like at least intermediate level arrangements. I was very disappointed to receive such a thin book containing so many huge movie pictures and proportionately so little music! Plus, I found the keyboard arrangements to be fairly simplistic and sometimes even "empty"/boring. If I can still return/exchange this, I will. Largely a waste of money, if I can't return it. This is why I usually DON'T purchase piano music over the internet unless I've had a chance to review it more thoroughly at a music store first!
Pawn Stars Volume 6
Pawn Stars Volume 6
I enjoy this show thought I must admit that at first I thought it was a goofy idea. But Pawn Stars has caught our attention and enthusiasm to the point my wife has added stopping in to see the guys to her "bucket list." The show is formulaic and simple yet as Rick says during the opening, you never know what's coming through the door. What makes it is the interaction between the four men -- Rick, Corey, the "old Man" and Chumlee -- as well as the insight provided by the pool of experts drawn in to examine weapons, art, rare books and other historic objects. Plus Rick has an excellent education and explains the history of whatever item catches his fancy. Excellent and engaging.
Thoreau's Morning Work: Memory and Perception in A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, the "Journal", and Walden
Thoreau's Morning Work: Memory and Perception in A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers, the "Journal", and Walden
This book is an in depth study to "A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers" and "Walden" by Henry David Thoreau and is aproached in a sensative way reflecting the fame of the ideas that Thoreau spread via Count Leo Tolstoy to Mahatma Gandhi reinventing the Sancrit word {Ahimsa} none violence into modern usage.
This book is a deeper look into different angles of the wisdom that Thoreau dismininated in his journals from reflextions from old Vedic scriptures with an interlctual trend that continued through to beyond Dr Martin Luther King and the movement of the nineteen sixties.
In all its a book that continues with a sympathetic view onto the ideas of Thoreau as the growth emerges from his closeness to nature and a profound care for all beings. Thoreau was one of the direct action man living in a time of delusion who is much negelected in these days of media hype and worship of the mighty dollar.
One Piece, Vol. 72 (72)
One Piece, Vol. 72 (72)
One Piece is my favorite manga/anime of all. It's always had a great balance of comedy & action... and it can also bring tears to your eyes in occasions.
The story & the characters have grown as the story has progressed.
Plus, the little covers for the chapters many times give you insight into what other characters have been up to in the mean time, and that has always been great!
Maybe You Should Fly a Jet! Maybe You Should Be a Vet! (Beginner Books)
Maybe You Should Fly a Jet! Maybe You Should Be a Vet! (Beginner Books)
This Dr. Seuss book is from 1980 and is out of print in retail book stores. Pros: Easy to read and rhymes, cool pictures, a variety of careers/jobs, incl some women in traditional male jobs and vice versa. Puts lots of ideas in the readers head, some that mightve never heard of.
Cons: Some jobs are not really "careers" (w/ much less income). This would need to possibly be explained to the child, if desired. A bit outdated maybe, but I think overall a great book.
Bis(s) zum Abendrot: Twilight-Saga 3
Bis(s) zum Abendrot: Twilight-Saga 3
Nach einem großartigen ersten Band folgte ein eher schwacher zweiter Teil. Mit "Bis(s) zum Abendrot" ist es der Autorin allerdings wieder gelungen, das Niveau zum ersten Band wieder zu erreichen.

Die Geschichte wird wieder einmal gut und flüssig erzählt, dazu wird die Handlung immer spannender und actiongeladener. Allerdings muss man aber auch sagen, dass die Geschichte viel zu vollgepackt ist. Es gibt viele Handlungsstränge, die am Ende miteinander verbunden werden, aber dennoch wirkt es beim Lesen an einigen Stellen zu viel auf einmal. Da gibt es die Werwölfe, die ihre eigenen Probleme haben, die Dreiecksbeziehung zwischen Bella, Jacob und Edward, die angebliche Mordserie und Victoria, die es weiterhin auf Bella abgesehen hat.

Trotz der vielen Handlungsstränge gibt es dennoch ein paar interessante Dinge, die man in diesem Buch vorfinden kann, so kommt z.B. endlich mal Rosalie zu Wort. Obwohl sie ein eher wenig beachteter Charakter bislang war, mochte ich sie auf Anhieb, da sie ganz anders als die anderen Cullens wirkte. Nun, wo man mehr über ihre Vergangenheit und ihre Zeit als Mensch erfährt, kann man sie und ihre Ansichten immer mehr verstehen. Gleiches gilt für Jasper, der auch endlich mal zu Wort kommen darf und nicht mehr nur wie ein stiller Beobachter wirkt.
Gleichzeitig bekommen die Wölfe wieder weniger Aufmerksamkeit, was mir sehr gut gefällt, denn ich sehe die "Twilight"-Reihe nach wie vor als Vampirroman an. Zwar ist die Geschichte der Werwölfe ganz nett und auch die Verhältnisse untereinander sind ab und zu interessant, allerdings werde ich mit Werwölfen allgemein nie ganz warm.

Die Charaktere entwickeln sich weiterhin relativ gut. Zwar gibt es mit Jacob die große Ausnahme, die restlichen Charaktere entwickeln sich jedoch von Kapitel zu Kapitel. Auch wenn mich Bella sehr oft nervt, muss ich gestehen, dass sie immer reifer und mutiger wird. Zwar war der Mut von Anfang an vorhanden, allerdings wirkte vieles oftmals unbeholfen und naiv, was man nun kaum noch bei ihr vorfindet. Victoria halte ich nach wie vor für eine unglaublich gute Protagonistin. Obwohl sie meist nur im Hintergrund agiert, spielt sie dennoch eine wichtige Rolle und will nur eines: Rache! Ihr Ziel ist Bella, die jedoch von allen Seiten beschützt wird.
Bei Jacob ist immer noch das Problem vorhanden, dass er sich absolut nicht weiterentwickelt. Bei ihm habe ich eher das Gefühl, als würde er Rückschritte machen, denn er benimmt sich nach wie vor enorm kindisch und aufdringlich. Ich wüsste absolut nicht, wie ich mit ihm umgehen würde, wenn ich ihn in meinem privaten Umfeld hätte. Er hält sich zum Teil für unwiderstehlich und lässt dies auch stellenweise deutlich raus, besonders wenn es um Bella geht.

Auch das Ende hat es in sich. Die Handlung ist nach wie vor nicht abgeschlossen, viele Fragen kommen weiterhin auf und es wird immer spannender. Dazu wird am Ende eine gewisse Bree Tanner vorgestellt, die zwar nur kurz auftaucht, der aber dennoch eine ganze Geschichte gewidmet wird. In "Bis(s) zum ersten Sonnenstrahl - das kurze zweite Leben der Bree Tanner" wird ihre Geschichte erzählt und man erhält weitere Einblicke zu "Bis(s) zum Abendrot", allerdings aus ihrer Sicht. Für Twilight Fans ein toller Zusatzband, für Gelegenheitsleser ist es jedoch nicht unbedingt spannend.

Mit dem Cover bin ich leider nicht warm geworden. Zwar erinnert dieses Cover nicht mehr zu sehr an einen historischen Roman, dennoch gefällt mir das Originalcover deutlich besser. Sehr schön sind allerdings die vielen Rottöne. Die Kurzbeschreibung liest sich toll und macht Lust auf mehr.

Insgesamt ist "Bis(s) zum Abendrot" ein Teil, der mir ganz gut gefallen hat. Zwar reicht dieser aufgrund seiner vielen Handlungsstränge nicht ganzcan den ersten Band heran, aber dafür ist es deutlich besser als der zweite Teil. Ein Muss für Twilight Fans!
Doctor No (The James Bond Classic Library)
Doctor No (The James Bond Classic Library)
My husband wanted to collect this whole set of Bond books. He's a huge fan. He loves the colorful design of each book and how every one has illustration that uniquely captures the feel of each book. He has them all now and really loves the way the set looks as a whole.
Dashing Through the Snow by Mary Higgins Clark, Carol Higgins Clark
Dashing Through the Snow by Mary Higgins Clark, Carol Higgins Clark
This was a very disappointing book. A complete waste of time. I kept hoping it would get better but it didn't. It bounced back and forth between two scenarios, completely losing any continuity, The story itself was .... stupid. Its only saving grace was that it was short. This is the first novel I read by Higgins Clark and I think the daughter is trying to hitch on to her mother's popularity. I'd really give it zero stars if possible.
harrap's A Stranger is watching (Yes you can) (French Edition)
harrap's A Stranger is watching (Yes you can) (French Edition)
Remarquable ! Non seulement le livre est passionnant comme toujours avec l'auteur, mais cette édition est une trouvaille, rendant la lecture en Anglais aisée et fort agréable. Vivement de nouveaux titres ! A signaler que la traduction est excellente...
Harry Potter 3 - De gevangene van Azkaban (Steelbook)
Harry Potter 3 - De gevangene van Azkaban (Steelbook)
I think Harry Potter 3 is brilliant. Directed by the mega multi-award winning director Alfonso Cuaron, of course. The 4K UHD copy is very dense and brilliantly coloured. My copy is from Poland and there are others from eg Italy and Australia but beware region compatability. We are region B in this, ok?
Why aren't the Harry Potters available in 4K UK? What are they holding back on?
Control, Variable Speed, Foot Pedal, Plastic, SR, L, 3 Prong - C-FCT-1
Control, Variable Speed, Foot Pedal, Plastic, SR, L, 3 Prong - C-FCT-1
I bought this item as I am just getting started in power carving. I am using a Dremel 300 with Flex-Shaft assembly. You plug the Dremel/rotary tool into the foot pedal and the foot pedal into the wall outlet, set the Dremel/rotary tool on the highest setting and you are all set. This beats having to reach to turn the Dremel off all the time. Works with variable speed Dremel/rotary tool with no problem; however the Dremel/rotary tool must be set at the highest setting. Do not use with the setting set on anything other than the highest setting or it may damage the rotary tool and/or foot pedal. Has rubber "feet" on the bottom to keep from sliding on the floor as well as mounting holes if you wanted to attach it more permanently. Great tool to have when using a rotary tool with a flex-shaft.
Primeval: Dangerous Dimension
Primeval: Dangerous Dimension
Based on the series episode, Helen leads the team to an anomaly. As dodos emerge, Helen slips away. Connor's friends Duncan and Tom steal a dodo accidentally left behind by the team. If you're familiar with the series, you'll remember what came next.

The adaptation remains true to the episode adding only descriptive explanations and filling in emotional context to introduce dialog. If you want to relive the episode, you'll enjoy this book. The book is also a good introduction to the series.

The publisher, Puffin Books, also offers A Rip in Time and The Lost Predator.
Leading Impact Teams: Building a Culture of Efficacy
Leading Impact Teams: Building a Culture of Efficacy
Leading Impact Teams provides a practical way to re-energize your professional learning teams. The book lays out the phases needed for systems to rethink teaching and learning to be more student centered while backing up their thinking with research around collective efficacy and the formative assessment process. Each chapter can help leaders focus team discussions using self assessment checklists, discussion prompts, and provides video examples of students and teachers in action through QR codes. Compared to the other books out there for professional learning communities, the authors made sure to keep it student focused in every aspect including providing the reader with classroom protocols for student ownership of the learning process. I have not found a more practical book for the busy educator.
Love, Alaska
Love, Alaska
This really captures every bit of the reason we all watch these kind of movies. You can escape just a little and fall 'in love' with the idea of love and what happens if you let you guard down a little. Two friends who have known each other over half of their lives went their separate ways only to find themselves back in the town of Love, Alaska...a small town that is big on romance. Each year singles travel to meet their soulmates and Finn is the pilot that picks them up and takes them to their destinations. Maggie, a Doctor soon learns of her favorite Uncle's passing and comes back to her hometown to take over his medical practice. The two of them realize they never really forgot about one another but, will they be able to look past all those years apart?
Amazon Brand - Vedaka Premium Green Moong Whole / Sabut, 1 kg
Amazon Brand - Vedaka Premium Green Moong Whole / Sabut, 1 kg
I am sure a lot of people who have cooked pulses and lentils would know what I am going to say: To cook whole pulses, the best way is to soak them for a day and then boil them. But sometimes we come across a few that won't soften even after soaking for a day or two. They wont soften even after boiling. In Kannada we call them ಕಲ್ಲು ಕಾಳು. Now here is what disappointed me about my purchase of 500gm Vedaka whole moong dal . Generally we come across 5-6 such pulses in 250gm. But, in this I find 10-12 in every handful (50 gm). The photograph is the number of such hard pulses I found in two handfuls (about 100 gm). This is definitely zero value for money because I am sure that atleast 10-15% by weight is wasted like this. But, it is horrible to come across even one such hard pulse while eating. And it is unacceptable if your guest finds such hard pulses in the dishes you serve them.

Recent posts by Otto Cox
Message Otto Cox