Rene Carter

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CSS: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners
CSS: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners
CSS: Basic Fundamental Guide for Beginners by MG Martin, William Bahl, et al.. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 8 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the css category.
John Grisham's Thrillers (Connect)
John Grisham's Thrillers (Connect)
John Grisham's Thrillers (Connect) by Damaris Team and John Grisham. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Like Lions: A Novel
Like Lions: A Novel
Like Lions: A Novel by Brian Panowich. Rated 4.2 out of 5 stars, with 92 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
The Cornwalls Are Gone
The Cornwalls Are Gone
The Cornwalls Are Gone by James Patterson, Brendan DuBois - contributor, et al.. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 572 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Shining
Shining
Shining by Stephen King, Julien Chatelet, et al.. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 148 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
The Stephen King Universe
The Stephen King Universe
The Stephen King Universe by Stanley Wiater , Christopher Golden , et al.. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 20 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
LDAP Programming with Java¿
LDAP Programming with Java¿
LDAP Programming with Java¿ by Rob Weltman and Tony Dahbura. Rated 3.2 out of 5 stars, with 19 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
Microsoft SQL Server 2017 on Linux
Microsoft SQL Server 2017 on Linux
Microsoft SQL Server 2017 on Linux by Benjamin Nevarez. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 5 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Transact-SQL Server User Defined Functions
Transact-SQL Server User Defined Functions
Transact-SQL Server User Defined Functions by Andrew Novick. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 2 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
R Programming Language: 2020 Edition
R Programming Language: 2020 Edition
R Programming Language: 2020 Edition by R Publishing. Rated 3 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the R programming category.
How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World
How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World
The modern American home is a veritable wonderland of technical innovations: clean water on demand, central heating and air conditioning, wireless Internet and telephony, flat screen electronics, and inexpensive lighting, to name just a few. “How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World” by popular science writer Steven Johnson describes, at a high level, how that wonderland came together over the centuries.

It is important to note that “How We Got to Now” does not explore six discrete technical innovations. Rather, Johnson provides a basic synopsis of events across a half-dozen areas, such as sanitation, lighting, and food preservation. Early on, he introduces a fascinating concept: the hummingbird effect. Put simply, an innovation, or cluster of innovations, in one field that ends up triggering major changes in a different domain altogether. He coins the term from the sexual reproduction strategies of plants (e.g. flowers supplemented pollen with even more energy-rich nectar to attract insects) that ended up shaping the design of a hummingbird’s wings (i.e. evolving an extremely unusual form of flight mechanics enabling them to hover). The best example, in my opinion, is how the Gutenberg press generated a demand for eyeglasses that led to a broader experimentation with glass lens that led to the microscope and the subsequent discovery of microscopic cells. Or how the advent of air-conditioning had a “long zoom” impact on American politics. Or how the development of sonar to listen to sound waves bouncing off icebergs led, a few generations later, to ultrasound and the abortion of tens of millions of female fetuses in China and India.

The content of each chapter is relatively superficial but peppered with fascinating personal anecdotes about the discovery of important insights or commercialization of technical innovations. Here are some of my favorites.

In the early 1900s, Clarence Birdseye was living in the frozen land of Labrador, Canada. He discovered that trout caught while ice fishing, which froze solid almost instantly in the minus 20-degree temperature of the Canadian winter, retained their flavor when later defrosted. Thus, the value of “flash freezing” was discovered and today we still enjoy “Birdseye” frozen peas for dinner.

In 1908, New Jersey doctor John Leal surreptitiously added chlorine to the public water reservoirs for Jersey City. His patent- and licensing-free discovery of a simple way to provide clean drinking water may be one of the greatest public health contributions in history. A recent study found that chlorinated water reduced the total mortality in the average American city from diseases like dysentery and cholera by 43% and reduced infant mortality by as much as 74%.

In the 1850s, Aaron Dennison, “the Lunatic of Boston,” mass-produced an inexpensive ($3.50) pocket watch, branded the “Wm. Ellery,” that was “the must-have consumer gadget of the late nineteenth century,” according to Johnson. Richard Sears, a Minnesota railroad agent, found that he could turn a nice profit selling the watches to other station agents. He partnered with Chicago businessman Alvah Roebuck to produce a mail-order catalog showcasing a range of watch designs, and Sears. Roebuck was born – and so was another example of the hummingbird effect.

A major theme of the book is that Johnson is deeply suspicious of the “great man theory” and “eureka moment” of invention. Consider the case of electric light. People had been tinkering with incandescent light for more than half-a-century before Thomas Edison’s breakthrough at Menlo Park in 1879. More than ten different inventors had earlier hit upon the same basic formula of a carbon filament suspended in a vacuum. “There was no lightbulb moment in the story of the lightbulb,” Johnson writes. Instead, the lightbulb, like most other technical innovations, was the result of a “slow hunch” that took years, sometimes decades, to germinate and mature. In Johnson’s estimation, “Edison invented the lightbulb the way Steve Jobs invented the MP3 player.” He made it reliable, easy to use, and widely available. If anything, Johnson says, Edison should be remembered for his contribution to the process of innovation, his efforts to collect a cross-disciplinary team to conduct a wide range of related research and development. The “invention” of Edison’s lightbulb was thus mostly about sweating the details and what Johnson calls “a bricolage of small improvements.” He acknowledges that Edison was a “true genius” and “a towering figure in nineteenth century innovation,” but that he should most be revered for his ability to build creative teams: “assembling diverse skills in a work environment that valued experimentation and accepted failure, incentivizing the group with financial rewards that were aligned with the overall success of the organization, and building on ideas that originated elsewhere.”

“How We Got to Now” is a fun, light read. Each chapter is colorfully illustrated and chopped up into several parts, each highlighting a part of the innovation chain that leads to the modern day. A week on your nightstand is probably all that it will take to enjoy this book.
Elon Musk: The Founder of Tesla, Paypal, and Space X
Elon Musk: The Founder of Tesla, Paypal, and Space X
This book is very basic and very thin (only 44 pages) and not worth the price $17.38. I returned the book for a refund. If you are looking for a more in depth book on Elon Musk, I recommend buying Elon Musk by Ashlee Vance (400 pages) listed at $14.99, New York Times Best Seller.
My Life and Work by Henry Ford: Fintan Books
My Life and Work by Henry Ford: Fintan Books
Few men have ever accomplished as much as Henry Ford did. His autobiography My Life and Work tells his early story in his own words.

Ford has been called many things, brilliant, eccentric, stupid, bigoted, stubborn, and more. The reader may find that he had many parts to make up his whole.

Ford explains why he created a car and then did not change it for many, many years. At the time he wrote My Life and Work, the Model T was still popular.

If you are studying business, you simply must read this book. It will give you a different perspective of how to run a business. Ford’s idea of paying higher wages was radical at the time. Today, it is a simple fact of life. If you want to keep good people, you have to pay them a fair wage.

My Life and Work was written pre-World War II. Many things have changed since then. This gives the reader a peek at what life was like “Between the Wars”.

For what it was meant to be, we give My Life and Work all five stars. Ford wrote this more to be an explanation of who he was than for anything else. We believe he hoped to some way validate himself to the American people.

There are many different versions of My Life and Work available on Kindle. Some are illustrated, some are not. They range in prices.

We were sent a complimentary copy of this book via a KDP promotion. Actually, we were sent three different versions of the book over the years. We are under no obligation to write any review, positive or negative.

We are disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission's 16 CFR, Part 255.
Let Me In Your Life
Let Me In Your Life
Aretha Franklin's 20th studio album dates from 1974 and contains hit singles 'Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing' and 'Until You Come Back To Me (That's What I'm Gonna Do)'. Anyone familiar with those two major records will get a pretty fair idea of the sound of the album, with some of the raw, emotive edges knocked off as the production headed in a smoother and more polished direction. A number 1 in the U.S. R&B chart, this is, as is much of Aretha's Atlantic output, a great album with well chosen covers by the likes of Bill Withers Ashford & Simpson, Leon Russell and Bobby Womack, which dominate the album. Just two of the 11 tracks are self-penned, but with Aretha that hardly matters as she makes the tracks her own. Ballads feature more prominently than on earlier Atlantic releases where the raw power of Aretha was to the fore, but here that voice is placed front and centre in the mix showing that delicacy is well within her ability, indicating an understanding of changing music tastes. Strings are very noticeable in the arrangements here in an album that just qualifies as being in The Queen of Soul's classic period, though seemingly striving to satisfy a wider audience with some of those rough edges knocked off.
Ring of Curse (English Subtitled)
Ring of Curse (English Subtitled)
"four black death
grudge feather death
poet demon blood lyrics
stub death child
paper dream nest teeth
teacher comparison bad
mystery man
heart pump blood
blood runs in body
you die when blood stops
artery and vein
breath stopping breath
think and breath
inhale exhale and inhale
and exhale, exhale, exhale, exhale
death death death death beat cut
gu fancy death
w eri death gogito death"

These are the words that open Ring of Curse following a short introduction by the members of Buono! Known as Gomennasai in its native country, Ring of Curse is a film adaptation of a cell phone novel. It stars the members of the three-person Hello! Project group Buono! as the characters of Yuka Hidaka, Hinako Kurohane, and Shiori Sonoda.

The story is split into three acts, told as a diary made by the protagonist, Yuka. Act 1 deals with Sonoda deciding to bully Kurohane following a test, disgusted by the fact that the weird, loner girl has been besting her grades. Since Kurohane had previously won a literary contest, Sonoda, as class president, decides to have her write a play for the cultural festival, with the intent to degrade her attempts. However, Kurohane soon turns the table on her tormentors through her writing.

Act 2 takes the form of Kurohane's diary, detailing her backstory and her reasons for what she did and Act 3 takes place a year after the events in Act 1 as Kurohane's curse rears its head again in Yuka's life.

I have to say, both Miyabi Natsuyaki and Momoko Tsugunaga did an excellent job portraying Kurohane and Sonoda. Miyabi does a perfect job capturing Kurohane's creepy and weird personality while Momoko nailed Sonoda's alpha bitch personality. If I didn't knew better, I would had thought Ms. Tsugunaga was one in real-life. Both women showed they can portray people that are complete opposites of their normal personalities and do it perfectly.

Airi Suzuki's portrayal of Yuka is just okay. Besides Ring of Curse/Gomennasai, I've seen Suzuki in Keitai Kanojo, Ousama Game, and Suugaku Joshi Gakuen (all three through fansubs since this film is the only one with an official English release). In the former two, it was the same as here. However, I quite enjoyed her appearance as one of the math girls of the week in Suugaku Joshi Gakuen and I think I know why. In Ring of Curse, Keitai Kanojo, and Ousama Game, her characters are mostly passive observers to the supernatural events, rarely actually taking an active role in the events. When the character does take an active role, as what happens here here and in Keitai Kanojo, she quickly becomes passive again, other characters taking the lead again. In fact, in Ousama Game, here character is completely a passive background character, occasionally delivering a line on the current situation and nothing else. In Suugaku, however, she actually takes an active role in her starring episode, being the antagonist of the week and showing a lot of personality. Really, the problem I find is that Ms. Suzuki just happens to get the misfortune of getting the weakest character and not really getting enough material to work with.

The translation for the subtitles are okay. Really, the only things that stick out to me is the fact that they translate -san, so you have situations where high schoolers are referring to each other as Mr./Ms. <insert family name>. It's just weird seeing students refer to each other in such a way. I feel they should had just omitted the honorifics in those situations. I also found they misspelled Yuka's name as Yuri neared the end and of course, there is the end of the opening text, which looks to have been left somewhat untranslated.

Now, throughout the film there are voice overs by Yuka, and some by Kurohane in Act 2. When it comes to Yuka's, they're mostly redundant. They mostly tell you what you are seeing on screen or are about to see. Kurohane's, on the other hand, actually helps to set the mood of Act 2 and works with the fact that we're supposed to be seeing what is in her diary as narrated by her words. It truly feels like a diary brought to life and brought substance to those scenes. Yuka's is just tedious and should had been dropped. Yeah, the whole movie is supposed to be Yuka's written recount of the events, but it just doesn't have the same feeling as Kurohane's.

Is Ring of Curse a bad film? No. Is it good? No. It is an average film of its kind. It's not really scary and the protagonist is overshadowed by her costars. The only part that really made me jumped was when Sonoda showed back up at the end of Act 1 and that was because of how sudden it was, not because of fright. *Nyan*

There was also a part before that that is just confusing. See, there is a scene where Yuka is at home where Sonoda calls her, asking if she was the one who sent the text with the weird message. Of course, it turns out to be Kurohane using Yuka's name. However, shouldn't Sonoda know from the get-go that it wasn't Yuka? She called Yuka's cell phone. She should have known that it wasn't from her by the fact the numbers wouldn't have matched. Plus, Yuka isn't someone who strikes me to forget to tell someone she changed numbers. It just feels like a plot hole.

I say only watch this if you're a fan of Buono! or one of the girls or are a fan of J-Horrors and want to experience all of them. Really, the best thing of the film is Miyabi and Momoko's acting. Other than that, the rest is just average.

As an aside, I find it funny that Arisa Komiya, who played Yoko Usami/Yellow Buster in Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters, plays one of Sonoda's posse. You see, back when all we knew of the sentai was the name Go-Busters, people speculated that it was going to be dealing with ghosts or curses in some way. That later turned out to be wrong. However, with that knowledge, it is funny that Komiya was in this before Go-Busters. In fact, her character's given name here is Yoko, same as on the show. It's almost as though Ring of Curse was predicting the future a little bit.
Rubies Lord of The Rings Child's Ringwraith Costume, Large
Rubies Lord of The Rings Child's Ringwraith Costume, Large
This costume works Ok as the base for my son's outfit. We added a lot of accessories. It's a little short, so I had to add on a little to the bottom.
Be warned: the size is very deceiving. It's called a large, both on the site and on the package . But the package also says for ages 8-10. Having shopped for kids clothes for many years now, nowhere have I ever come across clothes for an 8-10 year old labeled as 'large'. This costume should be called a 'medium'.
If you really need a large, buy the adult size and cut it to fit. It's made of lots of hanging bits haphazardly cut, so it should be easy to alter.
Also, it does shed a lot!!
And one more thing, the belt shown in the picture barely fits around the waist, let alone having any extra for hanging on the side. But it's not necessary anyway.
Stephen King's N
Stephen King's N
I can't help it. The visuals seem beautiful, the writing seems interesting enough but I can't help think that the viewer is being short changed. This is the second show I've seen done in this style, and I really hope this isn't the new trend. The art, is amazing but what ever happened to reading a graphic novel or a comic book or something. Has even that become too hard for us. I am being harsh for a reason. This isn't animation, it's story boarding for an actual animation being passed off as animation. I will not and cannot accept this.
Deadly Fall: A Protector Hero Romance (Harlequin Romantic Suspense Book 1928)
Deadly Fall: A Protector Hero Romance (Harlequin Romantic Suspense Book 1928)
Let me begin by stating that I am fan of Elle James' novels, but this is only the second novel I've read in her Devil's Shroud series, set on the Oregon coast, and it brought me back to my high school fixation on the Gothic novels of Phyllis Whitney and Victoria Holt, complete with the air of mystery surrounding a lost treasure in missing jewels, the possibility of a resident ghost, an oppressive fog, a Gothic mansion, and it all worked for me--I give it 4.5 stars.

As the novel opens, scarred yet handsome Wall Street billionaire Andrew Stratford is searching for his 6-year-old daughter, Leigha, and her dog, Brewer, in the thick fog that regularly descends over Cape Churn, Oregon. Although she's not supposed to leave the house, she's a willful, adventurous and curious little girl who spends far too much time alone with only their housekeeper, Mrs. Purdy, and an imaginary friend she's rather tight-lipped about, for company in Stratford House, the huge, 3-story Gothic mansion high on the cliffs above the Pacific ocean. As the Devil's Shroud fog closes in, Andrew senses a presence just before someone (or something) shoves him off the edge of the cliff, yet he manages to grab onto a tree root and climb his way back up to safety, rather than falling onto the jagged rocks 300 feet below. While at the hospital to have his wounds seen to, he reports the incident to the deputy policeman who, after hearing his tale, suggests that he contact SOS, the Stealth Operations Specialists, who have recently opened their service in Cape Churn, to have them recommend a bodyguard for his daughter. He's expecting a big brawny bodyguard, but that's not who they send him. If you're expecting a faint-hearted damsel in distress, you're in for a surprise.

Enter Dixie (Dix) Reeves, a new hire at SOS, a well-trained Army Ranger who was once captured and tortured by terrorists, and has the PTSD and emotional scars to prove it. She's also a champion MMA fighter, and she doesn't like Stratford's assumption that she's too small and weak to be of service until she has no problem subduing him. While she didn't expect that her first assignment with SOS would be something so common as to be tasked with being a bodyguard to scarred and reclusive Andrew Stratford and his daughter, Leigha, she’s committed to doing her best to keep them safe, and the sparks that fly between Dix and Andrew are a distraction she doesn't need.

What follows is a rock-solid, suspense-filled Gothic romance novel, with quite a bit more sexual tension between the main characters than the novels I read in high school. Leigha is an absolutely charming child, although she too bears emotional scars from the incident that caused Andrew's physical burns and scars, and the explanation for all that is one I won't reveal, but it was hard to miss the similarities between this story and elements of Daphne de Maurier's classic novel, Rebecca, and Charlotte Bronte's brilliant novel, Jane Eyre--two of my all-time favorite reads.

My only complaint with the novel is that Ms. James never gives us a full explanation of exactly what happened while Dix was held captive to make her so wary of a relationship that she calls herself "damaged goods" when Andrew makes his attraction to her known. It was far easier to understand Andrew's physical scars when the explanation for how he got them is revealed.

Aside from the aforementioned minor flaws, this was a very good read, with well-drawn characters, mystery-upon-mystery, and it was hard to put down. The nefarious goings on at Stratford House, ghostly encounters, hidden tunnels, and the multi-layered family history behind them is riveting, the characters are compelling, and although part of a series, it all worked perfectly well as a standalone, and I am happy to recommend it.

I voluntarily reviewed an advance reader copy of this novel.
Untitled David Baldacci
Untitled David Baldacci
I am a big fan of Baldacci but this was extremely disappointing. It was dull from the beginning and I thought it was about to improve when Robbie came on the scene but unfortunately the dullness continued. I understand that Decker is changing but he's seems to be writings out all the mannerisms which have made the character and books so enjoyable. Robie's introduction was wasted and he could of been any CIA assassin. Displayed none of the character that he had developed over his own series of books. It seemed like ages waiting for the next book in this series and after reading it I wish I was still waiting. Tired and lazy writing.
The New Gothic: A Collection of Contemporary Gothic Fiction
The New Gothic: A Collection of Contemporary Gothic Fiction
Like most anthologies, this does contain a number of excellent pieces, but there are some problems with it as a collection. It looks like they were trying to cobble together the beginnings of a movement, but there is a fair amount of disparity in these pieces. The only thing they have in common is that they are all more or less literary works that present a somewhat gothic sensibility, altho I would argue that a couple of them dont even have that. Included here are works that are overtly gothic, but others that are from very different genres, like experimental fiction. A couple of the pieces are not even short stories, but excerpts from longer works, like a fine clip from Anne Rice's Interview with a Vampire (I guess they had to include her), and a completely unnecessary bit from Martin Amis's London Fields (I like Amis, but there is no way you could consider his writing gothic, i.m.o.)

However, there are a few outstanding items here that made it a worthwhile read, and most of them were from women. Do women have a greater ability to write in the gothic mode than men? I loved Angela Carter's "The Merchant of Shadows", a witty take on a Sunset Boulevard-esque scenario. Ruth Rendell contributes one of her cold gems, this one a satirical piece about a posh lady who finds herself taking her first ride on a London tube train and beginning to freak out. Emma Tennant (another British female) checks in with "Rigor Beach", a very dark and perverse little number about a black widow-type who lures a man to her apartment, has sex with him, poisons him , and then has a little fun with the corpse. John Edgar Wideman's "Fever", a story I have seen turn up in other anthologies, is a brilliant (and yes, feverish) depiction of a pandemic disease ravaging a city (that might be Philadelphia) in some decade long past. Other good ones were Jamaica Kincaid's wildly creative "Ovando", McGrath's "The Smell" about a puritanical man's obsession with a strange smell in his home, Jeanette Winterson's sketch of a neighborhood oddball, and Scott Bradfield's "Didn't She Know", in which a sexy girl flirts (harmlessly, she thinks) with a bunch of lonely old retirees. Morrow's story about a man who compulsively steals little prized possessions from people was interesting as well.

Some of the other pieces were well-written, but the content did not particularly grab me. Overall this was a mixed bag. I am not sure how much the editors had to work with - I mean, there are a few McGraths and Rendells out there, but is adult gothic fiction really a big field that produces a lot of short stories? Maybe not.
The Christmas Lodge
The Christmas Lodge
After a long and illustrious career traveling the galaxy and fighting the Goa'uld with the rest of the Stargate SG-1 team, Daniel Jackson retires to his childhood home in woodlands of Oregon/Washington and takes over the bed & breakfast that his family has run for generations. Trying to forget his past off-planet loves lost, he kept a low profile about his past and tried to live a fairly anonymous life. Known to the locals by his childhood name of "Little Jack", he married a beautiful lady and became a daddy to a wonderful daughter; but then, tragedy stuck. His wife died leaving him to raise their young little girl all alone. Then, his parents got in a bad traffic accident forcing Little Jack to care for them in the big city hospital until, they too, died. All the while, a few big snow-storms-of-the-century begin to devastate the historical lodge, leaving it and Jack's dreams close to ruin.

Eventually, a former frequent guest of the lodge returns. Mary hasn't been there since she and Jack were young, but finds it in her heart to try to save the building her family spent so much time in. Can Mary help save the lodge? Will Mary be able to heal the divisions in her family? Does Teal'c, O'Neill, and Carter stop by with a hammer and wrench to help rebuild the deteriorating plumbing? And once everyone else is out of earshot, will they will reminisce about their past adventures and all the times they saved the Earth? Indeed.

This is decent TV movie. If you're a scifi fan, imagining Michael Shanks in some sort of post-SG-1 secret identity reassignment program makes it even better. You can see the Daniel Jackson mannerisms in many scenes and it brought an extra smile to me.
Harry Potter Ornament
Harry Potter Ornament
This ornament is adorable i cant wait to hang it on my tree this Christmas! I'm making a "movie themed" tree so I'm getting an ornament with all my favorite movie characters :D the detail on this ornament is awesome!
Mystical Fire Flame Colorant Vibrant Long-Lasting Pulsating Flame Color Changer for Indoor or Outdoor Use 0.882 oz Packets 12 Pack
Mystical Fire Flame Colorant Vibrant Long-Lasting Pulsating Flame Color Changer for Indoor or Outdoor Use 0.882 oz Packets 12 Pack
Fairly cool product. Here's the deal: the item is small packets made of plastic about the size of an instant hot chocolate pack, but more rectangular. You toss a packet in your fire, and as the fire starts to burn through the plastic, the material inside ignites and you start to see blue and green flames in your fire. The effect is neat. We used it for a fire in our fire pit during camping. To really get a cool effect you'll have to use more than one pack at a time because the effect is pretty localized on the area you threw the pack in and the packs are relatively small as mentioned before. We cut open a pack, and the material inside looks like blueish sand. We wanted to see if we could get the effect by pouring this sand directly on the fire or spreading in all over the wood, but no luck!! Not sure what is so special about the bags. They seem to be just tough plastic. But the sand only seems to burn well if it is inside the bag, as per the directions from the manufacturer. Regardless, the effect was fun. We enjoyed using it and added a little ambiance to the ghost story telling! Also, because the effect was created by chemicals, we DID NOT cook any food over the open flames. You should probably cook any hot dogs or marshmallows first before you decide to use this product. I'd buy this again because it wasn't too expensive and it added a little fun to our fire.
Promo Codes
Promo Codes
Was hoping for coupons for amazon didn't get anything out of this dont get options for zero stars so gets a 1

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