Royal Sanders

Joined a year ago

Royal's Favorites
A Walk to Remember
A Walk to Remember
A Walk to Remember by Nicholas Sparks. Rated 4.6 out of 5 stars, with 2539 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Harry Potter Books 1-7 Special Edition Boxed Set
Harry Potter Books 1-7 Special Edition Boxed Set
Harry Potter Books 1-7 Special Edition Boxed Set by J.K. Rowling , J. K. Rowling , et al.. Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars, with 1246 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
THE DARKNESS
THE DARKNESS
THE DARKNESS by Stephen R. King. Rated 3.6 out of 5 stars, with 15 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Frankenstein
Frankenstein
Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley , Bernie Wrightson, et al.. Rated 1 out of 5 stars, with 1 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
PYTHON: THE NO-NONSENSE GUIDE: Learn Python Programming Within 12 Hours! (Including a FREE Python Cheatsheet & 50+ Exercises With Original Python Files ) (Cyberpunk Programming Series Book 1)
PYTHON: THE NO-NONSENSE GUIDE: Learn Python Programming Within 12 Hours! (Including a FREE Python Cheatsheet & 50+ Exercises With Original Python Files ) (Cyberpunk Programming Series Book 1)
PYTHON: THE NO-NONSENSE GUIDE: Learn Python Programming Within 12 Hours! (Including a FREE Python Cheatsheet & 50+ Exercises With Original Python Files ) (Cyberpunk Programming Series Book 1) by Cyberpunk University. Rated 2.7 out of 5 stars, with 24 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Python programming' category.
WordPress Multisite Administration
WordPress Multisite Administration
WordPress Multisite Administration by Tyler L. Longren. Rated 2.5 out of 5 stars, with 2 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
The Complete Idiot's Guide to SQL
The Complete Idiot's Guide to SQL
The Complete Idiot's Guide to SQL by Steven Holzner Ph.D.. Rated 4.8 out of 5 stars, with 9 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Databases DeMYSTiFieD, 2nd Edition
Databases DeMYSTiFieD, 2nd Edition
Databases DeMYSTiFieD, 2nd Edition by Andy Oppel. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 44 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
SQL Queries: 200+ Queries to Challenge you.
SQL Queries: 200+ Queries to Challenge you.
SQL Queries: 200+ Queries to Challenge you. by Swaroop Kallakuri. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 81 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
Joel on Software: And on Diverse and Occasionally Related Matters That Will Prove of Interest to Software Developers, Designers, and Managers, and to Those Who, Whether by Good Fortune or Ill Luck, Work with Them in Some Capacity
Joel on Software: And on Diverse and Occasionally Related Matters That Will Prove of Interest to Software Developers, Designers, and Managers, and to Those Who, Whether by Good Fortune or Ill Luck, Work with Them in Some Capacity
Joel on Software: And on Diverse and Occasionally Related Matters That Will Prove of Interest to Software Developers, Designers, and Managers, and to Those Who, Whether by Good Fortune or Ill Luck, Work with Them in Some Capacity by Joel Spolsky. Rated 4.4 out of 5 stars, with 97 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Ruby programming category.
Migrating to Fortran 90 (Nutshell Handbooks)
Migrating to Fortran 90 (Nutshell Handbooks)
Migrating to Fortran 90 (Nutshell Handbooks) by James Kerrigan. Rated 4.9 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Shell programming category.
The Great Book of Hawaii: The Crazy History of Hawaii with Amazing Random Facts & Trivia (A Trivia Nerds Guide to the History of the United States 7)
The Great Book of Hawaii: The Crazy History of Hawaii with Amazing Random Facts & Trivia (A Trivia Nerds Guide to the History of the United States 7)
If you’ve never read one of this author GREAT STATE books, then you’ll be in for a treat. Like the rest of the books in this series Alaska, California, Florida, New York, Ohio and Texas, this book is chuck of state trivia, trivia which runs the gamut from just being amazing to being weird or depressing, all of which makes this book quite interesting. But unlike these books, since Hawaii had once been a possession of the US, it had its own language, Hawaiian language words are scattered all through the pages of this book.

The author, Bill O’Neill, in this book has copied the same format he’s successfully used in the rest of the books in this series.

In each of the six chapters this book contains:
1- Hawaii’s History
2- Hawaii’s Pop Culture
3- Hawaii’s Attractions
4- Hawaii’s Inventions, Ideas and More
5- Hawaii’s Biggest Haunts, Supernatural and Other Weird Facts
6- Hawaii’s Sports
Mr. O’Neill begins each chapter by taking an item regarding its topic and gives his readers a brief, yet informative description of about it, this is followed by some random facts, which is then culminated by his giving some questions related to the information which the chapter has just given, naturally the answers are given as well.

While some of the facts in this book answer the question raised the questions the author wrote about in the description for the book; others might answers a question you might have wanted to know about for a long time:

• How did Hawaii get its name?
• Why is it called the Aloha State?
• Why was it once called “The Kingdom of Hawaii”?
• Which sport was invented in Hawaii?
• Which movies have been filmed in the state?
• What legends from the Hawaiian culture haunt the state?
• What’s Hawaii’s most famous unsolved mystery?

All in all, once again this book is a wonderful compendium of informational trivia, from the simplistic to the interesting to the amazing, trivia which should be quite interesting to anyone who reads it. So, in the end, with all things consider, for wanting to share the information he’s gathered with everyone who reads it, I’m happy to give Mr. O’Neill the 5 STARS he’s gotten from this reviewer.
Oprah Winfreys Special Wisdom (Korean Edition)
Oprah Winfreys Special Wisdom (Korean Edition)
Oprah Winfreys Special Wisdom (Korean Edition) by Oprah Winfrey and Jaehoon Song. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with null ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Oprah Winfrey" category.
shop4ever Re-Elect Trump 2020 Make Liberals Cry Again Women's V-Neck T-Shirt Political Shirts Slim FIT
shop4ever Re-Elect Trump 2020 Make Liberals Cry Again Women's V-Neck T-Shirt Political Shirts Slim FIT
The shirt itself fit great but the sleeves were way too tight. My bicep is only 10" around. I would expect a small to have some room but it is cutting off the circulation. It relaxes a little bit as I wear it, but as soon as I wash it again at super tight. Otherwise I really like the look of the print and the color of the shirt, I just only wish the sleeves were a little bigger. Maybe it's just this shirt, maybe someone else wouldn't have the same problem. I am only speaking from my experience.
Bokura no kagai jugyo [Japanese Edition]
Bokura no kagai jugyo [Japanese Edition]
主人公が死んだはずの少女を駅で見かけたことから事件は始まります。
舞台が実在する駅であることや主人公を振り回す魅力的なヒロイン等、読んでいてわくわくします。
大分昔に書かれた小説ですが、今読んでも面白い!
Case Closed, Vol. 14: The Magical Suicide
Case Closed, Vol. 14: The Magical Suicide
Gosho Aoyama, Case Closed, vol. 14 (ViZ, 1994)

Just when I'm ready to write Aoyama off, he gets back to the overarching storyline. Tangentially, to be sure, and he cops out at the end, but at least it's there, and so I know I'll keep going with Case Closed for at least a little while longer. It also seems as if he's getting a bit more complex in setting up his cases, which is nice. There's still some life in the corpse yet, I guess. ***
The April Robin Murders (A Random House Mystery)
The April Robin Murders (A Random House Mystery)
I have been re-reading some of the old classics and now I am ready to review them. Craig Rice did not have a great life: she had suicidal attempts and many other problems, but oh, brother, could she write great screwball mysteries! Aside from her Malone, and the Justuses mysteries, she wrote three books of Bingo Riggs and Handsome Kusack. The first is a masterpiece, The Thursday Turkey Murders, the second The Sunday Pigeon Murders can only be described as good, probably a case of writer's cramps.
The third, the one under discussion here is The April Robin Murders, which was finished by Ed McBain, remember his 87th Precinct Mysteries, is a wonderful example of the old fashioned screwball and more: a really puzzling mystery.
Now they are in Hollywood and both the writers, it is difficult to separate them, (but Mr. McBain's polished prose more than Ms. Rice's)shines through) give a great description of the town and the ambiance. The April Robins mansion and the people around are real. No, not the Chandler kind but Ms. Rice imbued them with real charm and wit:Mr. Bulong, and the lawyer, Arthur Schlee and others appear genuine. The mystery is vintage Golden Age- alas, the end in 1958 was near. The writing is crisp, the mystery is enjoyable and as usual with Ms. Rice, the ending does not always live up to the roller coaster ride before.
For Craig Rice fans, don't miss it.
For Your Eyes Only, and Other Stories (James Bond series, Book 8)
For Your Eyes Only, and Other Stories (James Bond series, Book 8)
Published in 1960, this collection of short stories was the eighth print outing for Ian Fleming's superspy James Bond. By using a short story format Fleming was forced to write pithier, faster tales than a full length novel, but was also free to experiment a little with his story telling and tell stories that would just not sit comfortably within the usual Bond milieu. For my money it is one of Fleming's best pieces of writing. Story by story:

From a view to a kill - This is a `straight' Bond adventure, a fast paced thrilling ride from start to finish, with a lot of incident packed into it. The tale opens dramatically with the murder of a dispatch rider in France. Bond is sent in to try and find the killer, and soon is onto a hitherto unseen trail due to an old maxim of M's. There is an interesting investigation and the tales ends with a thrilling action set piece.

For your eyes only - The tale opens with the brutal murder of an elderly couple in Jamaica. Bond is dispatched by M to avenge the murder, as it turns out the couple were old friends of M. The meeting between M and Bond is superb, and starts a running theme throughout the story of the morality of Bond's actions, and the weight that is sometimes on M's shoulders. There is a vividly drawn section with Bond closing in on his prey, and a tensely written and thrilling final shootout. It's the best of the `straight' adventures here.

Quantum of solace - Don't worry, this bears no resemblance to the film, it is much much better. This is the first of the tales here in which Fleming tries to do something different. Bond is attending a dull dinner party, after it ahs finished hi host starts to tell him a story about one of the hosts old friends, his emotional shortcomings and the break-up of his marriage. It's a clever piece of writing, managing to bring this every day tale into the Bond Milieu, and showing Bond's more human side as he reacts to the tale. Fleming in previous books had a really vivid prose style that he used to great effect to describe physical situations, here he uses it to similarly good effect to describe the emotional situation as he dissects the marriage. It's a superb piece of writing.

Risico - Another straight Bond adventure in which he is sent off to Italy to deal with a smuggling ring. After his initial contact with an informant he sets off to kill Enrico Columbo, who he has been told is the head of the racket. But after a dramatic scene, Columbo captures Bond and in a well written meeting the two men become friends. Columco tells Bond that he has been set up by the informer, adn they set off together to deal with the real villain in another excellently portrayed shootout.

The Hildebrand rarity - The second experimental tale here. Bond is travelling on a yacht with a tycoon and his wife. The tycoon is a bully, and regularly beats his wife. He is also searching for a rare fish, the Hildebrand rarity of the title. After finding and killing the fish, he is later found dead himself. After an internal debate, Bond sets the scene to make it look like an accident rather than murder, so as to save himself from being embroiled in a murder investigation, and because he feels sorry for the wife. This is another tale that focuses on Bond's human side, and looks at his attitude to death and morality.

The book is worth 5 stars.

This unabridged audio reading from Samuel West really does the book justice. He really does very little with his voice, yet manages to distinguish a host of characters. He also has a real pace for the rhythm of the stories, building up the tension in the thrilling sequences, and giving a very sympathetic reading in the softer tales. It comes on 6 discs in a spindle case, and clock in at 6 hours 20 minutes. It's superb, 5 stars.
Black Orchids, A Nero Wolfe Double Mystery,
Black Orchids, A Nero Wolfe Double Mystery,
I got this book for our 28th Wedding Anniversary, the "orchid" anniversary. At one point in our marriage, I read all the Rex Stout Nero Wolfe mysteries to my wife while she was nursing our children, and she enjoyed reading the two stories contained in this book again.

Alas, the particular edition I got was yellowing and falling apart.

But if you can get an intact edition, go for it for the mystery and the humor. You won't be disappointed.
The discoverie of witchcraft
The discoverie of witchcraft
The legal theory of witchcraft in Catholic Europe was airtight: It was a capital offense to be a witch, and it was also a capital offense to question whether witchcraft even existed. Had there been no Reformation, European Christians would still be burning witches, since the Roman church still believes in demonolatry.

Reginald Scot's "Discoverie of Witchcraft" is one of the few prose books from Elizabethan England that still enjoys an actual readership in the 21st century. It remains well worth reading.

Scot, a Kentish gentleman of wide reading, was able, in Anglican England, to attack witchcraft root and branch, and his attack is a mishmash of modern, evidence-based thinking, extreme religious bigotry, reporting from the field and medieval gullibility.

In Book XIII, Scot comes close to a statement of experimental investigation: "In this art of natural magicke, God almightie hath hidden manie secret mysteries; as wherein a man may learne the properties, qualities and knowledge of all nature. For it teaches to accomplish maters in such sort and opportunitie, as the common people thinketh the same to be miraculous."

This is not far from Arthur Clarke's observation that, to the uninitiated, any sufficiently advanced technology must seem miraculous.

Yet on the same page, Scot falls for the classical fable about the remora, the sucking fish that could halt the progress of the largest ship.

Scot was not a modern man. Throughout, he considers Holy Scripture the strongest authority, and his argument that so-called witches (and their devils) cannot perform miracles relies on nothing more than an assertion -- not countenanced in scripture -- that the age of miracles was shut down by God's power in apostolic times. This is grasping at straws.

However, although he got to his conclusions by reasoning that was far from airtight, he got to the right place.

He advises his readers to skip eight books "of bawdie," which of course are some of the most interesting that he penned. He knew conjuring tricks and gave away some of the tricksters' secrets, but not all. It appears he did not understand some of the stunts he had seen, since he often has to fall back on a formula that the last step of the conjuration "is easy to be doone," without saying how.

It is interesting to see how much effort he has to give to either debunking the ancient poets who trusted witchcraft, or building up the skeptics. The weight given to the poets, to us, seems contradictory considering the primacy he has already given to scripture.

It is not possible to tell whether he understood the contradiction. I think not, but it is possible that he was making a lawyer's brief and felt obliged to take note of evidence that others might find persuasive, even if he didn't. However, I think he was medieval enough that he had not really shaken off the shackles of scholasticism.

In the histories of ideas, Francis Bacon, who wrote more than a generation later, gets the credit for stating the modernist approach to nature, but most of what Bacon said can be found in Scot, although it takes a bit of tweezering to separate it from the superstitious bits.

As another reviewer notes, the Dover edition is incomplete, ending at Book XVI with this statement: "And now somewhat shall be said concerning divels and spirits in the discourse following."

Recent posts by Royal Sanders
Message Royal Sanders