Skylar Davis

Joined a year ago

Skylar's Favorites
Ruby on Rails Bible
Ruby on Rails Bible
Ruby on Rails Bible by Timothy Fisher. Rated 3.4 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the ruby on rails category.
Daydreaming Danny and the Green Dragon
Daydreaming Danny and the Green Dragon
Daydreaming Danny and the Green Dragon by Joseph W. Ruder. Rated 5 out of 5 stars, with 29 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the J. K. Rowling category.
The Hideaway
The Hideaway
The Hideaway by Lauren K. Denton. Rated 4.5 out of 5 stars, with 3983 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Nicholas Sparks category.
Siete vidas (Spanish Edition)
Siete vidas (Spanish Edition)
Siete vidas (Spanish Edition) by John Grisham. Rated 4 out of 5 stars, with 17 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Il cliente
Il cliente
Il cliente by GRISHAM John -. Rated 3.6 out of 5 stars, with 10 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the John Grisham category.
Stephen King Collection: Bag of Bones, Black House, Blaze, Carrie, Cell, Christine, Cujo, Dark Half, Dead Zone, Desperation, Different Seasons, Dreamcatcher, Duma Key, Eyes of the Dragon, Everythings Eventual, Firestarter, Four Past Midnight, From...
Stephen King Collection: Bag of Bones, Black House, Blaze, Carrie, Cell, Christine, Cujo, Dark Half, Dead Zone, Desperation, Different Seasons, Dreamcatcher, Duma Key, Eyes of the Dragon, Everythings Eventual, Firestarter, Four Past Midnight, From...
Stephen King Collection: Bag of Bones, Black House, Blaze, Carrie, Cell, Christine, Cujo, Dark Half, Dead Zone, Desperation, Different Seasons, Dreamcatcher, Duma Key, Eyes of the Dragon, Everythings Eventual, Firestarter, Four Past Midnight, From... by Stephen King. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with undefined ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Demons and Other Inconveniences
Demons and Other Inconveniences
Demons and Other Inconveniences by Dan Dillard. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 70 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Stephen King category.
Absolute Java: (5th Edition)
Absolute Java: (5th Edition)
Absolute Java: (5th Edition) by Walter Savitch. Rated 3.8 out of 5 stars, with 48 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'Java programming' category.
PHP: Learn PHP Programming - CRUSH IT IN ONE DAY. Learn It Fast. Learn It Once. Get Coding Today. (PHP, PHP Programming, PHP Course, PHP Book, PHP Programming Language, PHP Book-Course, Learn PHP)
PHP: Learn PHP Programming - CRUSH IT IN ONE DAY. Learn It Fast. Learn It Once. Get Coding Today. (PHP, PHP Programming, PHP Course, PHP Book, PHP Programming Language, PHP Book-Course, Learn PHP)
PHP: Learn PHP Programming - CRUSH IT IN ONE DAY. Learn It Fast. Learn It Once. Get Coding Today. (PHP, PHP Programming, PHP Course, PHP Book, PHP Programming Language, PHP Book-Course, Learn PHP) by Giggle Publishing. Rated 3.7 out of 5 stars, with 18 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP
Wireless Web Development with PHP and WAP by Ray Rischpater. Rated 4.1 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
Learning Heroku Postgres
Learning Heroku Postgres
Learning Heroku Postgres by Patrick Espake. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 4 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'PHP programming' category.
SQL The Complete Reference, 3rd Edition
SQL The Complete Reference, 3rd Edition
SQL The Complete Reference, 3rd Edition by James R. Groff, Paul N. Weinberg , et al.. Rated 4.3 out of 5 stars, with 18 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the 'SQL database' category.
An Embedded Software Primer
An Embedded Software Primer
An Embedded Software Primer by David E. Simon. Rated 4.7 out of 5 stars, with 41 ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the Go programming category.
Life on the Mississippi (Dover Thrift Editions)
Life on the Mississippi (Dover Thrift Editions)
This book is written in Mark Twain's illimitable and distinctive style and is packed with anecdotes and facts about the river, both at the time he was writing and previously.

It is a fascinating portrait of life on a steamboat and of the River itself at that time and since Mark Twain had been a licensed pilot on the Mississippi, it is a book written by someone who knows his subject. (His pen-name of Mark Twain was taken from the leadsman's calling out the depth of 'two fathoms').

The passages about his apprenticeship when learning his trade as a river pilot are among the most fascinating, but the many historical facts which he also incorporates into the book also make extremely interesting reading.

The river is several thousand miles long, and when the young Mark Twain said to his instructor, the senior pilot Horace Bixby, "but surely you don't expect me to know ALL the landmarks all along the river?", his mentor replied, "Son, I don't EXPECT you to know them, you MUST know them". For at that time and without any modern technical aids, or even electricity for nighttime travel, navigation of the river could prove extremely dangerous.

One of the many fascinating facts about this river was its habit of continually changing course, or "cutting through" a bend - sometimes marooning a former riverside town several miles inland, and even putting it into another state or county entirely.

The author describes the river as being 4000 miles long. But the Internet gives a number of answers as to length, varying from 3,710 miles long to 2,550 miles - quite a difference! But whoever is right, it is certainly a very long river, (among the very longest in the world), and all agree that at its widest it is seven miles wide and winds its way through no fewer than 10 US states.

I would thoroughly recommend this book as a most informative read, but crucially, it is written not in a dry and dusty manner, but in a delightfully informal and racy style, and is packed with stories, anecdotes and historical facts, making it extremely readable.
Warren Buffett: A Biography of the most Intelligent Businessman Ever
Warren Buffett: A Biography of the most Intelligent Businessman Ever
This short booklet is rather article.

The content is a bit chaotic, and poorly researched. There could be much more interesting thing written about Warren Buffet. Instead there are some generalities.

I am afraid that you can find better written and more valuable Warren Buffet's biography on Wiki - for free.

As you can see the author had written a number of articles on various topics - from JFK, Holocaust through Ancient Egypt, and nearly all of those articles are rated 1* due to poor research, grammar and writing. This should answer a question if this booklet is worth buying.

The booklet is worth 1*. The second is because I got it for free - for free I just don't like it (2*), but if I had spend money on this - I would hate it and give it 1*.
Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement
Late Bloomers: The Power of Patience in a World Obsessed with Early Achievement
Rich Karlgaard defines a late bloomer "as a person who fulfills their potential later than expected; often their talents aren't even visible to others initially [and they may not even be aware of them]. The key word here is expected. And second, they fulfill their potential while marching to their own drummer. They don't grit their teeth to try to meet the expectations of their parents or society."

In his classic work, Denial of Death, Ernest Becker acknowledges that no one can deny physical death but there is another form of death that can be denied: The death that occurs when we become wholly preoccupied with fulfilling others' expectations of us.

For example, Karlgaard makes frequent references to the "early achievement obsession" and the damage it can do the late bloomers. They are judged according to the Wonder Child Ideal as exemplified by early bloomers -- including, listed in alpha order, Magnus Carlsen, Madame Curie, Albert Einstein, Enrico Fermi, John Stuart Mill, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Blaise PASCAL, Pablo Picasso, Arthur Rimbaud, and John von Neumann -- who achieved peak performance in one or more fields while in childhood.

Late bloomers suffer many of the same frustrations, aggravations, and anxieties that people with undiagnosed learning disabilities encounter, beginning in childhood. They are constantly the victims of unfair and usually humiliating comparisons and contrasts with family members and friends. Karlgaard identifies the major factors that can -- and often do, in combination -- delay blooming and perhaps even preclude it. His conclusions are driven by the latest neuroscience and cognition research. "That means our current obsession with early blooming is a human construct, not supported by science."

In Chapter 9, Kalgaard makes several key points while explaining "the keys to late bloomer persistence" by taking a closer look at the power of stories, the plasticity of persistence, and how they're linked. "Stories don't just describe what's happened -- they help determine what will happen. "The stories we tell ourselves help shape our attitudes and enhance our well-being. For late bloomers this is terrific news....if we late bloomers change our story [over time], we can change our behavior and even our life."

Then Karlgaard points out that, "While plenty of Freud's work has been discounted. part of his genius was in his ability to work with individuals to make sense of their otherwise messy lives. The key insight that Freudian psychoanalysts came up with was that their patients somehow couldn't keep the story of themselves straight -- or they had no story at all. They had the task of repairing essentially broken stories, like a script doctor. In other words, the real value in psychoanalysis was in working with patients to dissect or sift through random memories and events that on their own made little sense, to construct a coherent narrative. The story would be about how a patient got from point A somewhere in the past, to the present, then oriented themselves toward the future in a meaningful way."

In a sense, constructing a narrative did more than just help individuals see their life events in a new way. It shaped their reality by making it manageable."

Here's a question to consider. Who had the greatest impact on your personal growth and professional development? However different they may be in most respects, I'll bet all of them cared so deeply about helping you to succeed that they challenged you to meet (if not exceed) very high standards, then did everything they could to help you succeed. They cared enough to tell you what you needed to know and it was not always what you wanted to hear. Late bloomers need the same sustained support, encouragement, and reassurance.

Every human life is a work in progress. Obviously, some take much longer to "bloom" than do others. Some never "bloom" or at least fulfill a few expectations. Fortunately, Rich Karlgaard's book wholly repudiates the early-blooming madness. "We all have a supreme destiny: to discover our gifts [and help others to discover theirs] however long it takes, to pursue our deepest purposes, and to bloom."
Amazon CEO Letters ( 1997 - 2018 ) : CEO Letters & Biz Reports Book 6
Amazon CEO Letters ( 1997 - 2018 ) : CEO Letters & Biz Reports Book 6
“A huge thank you to each and every customer for allowing us to serve you, to our shareowners for your support, and to Amazonians everywhere for your ingenuity, your passion and your high standards.” ~ Jeff Bezos

Jony Dev has worked at Google, Facebook and Amazon. Now as a Chief Data Scientist he spends his time working for a Tech Start-up and writing interesting books. This is the only book I've read by him and it provides a lot of insight into the mind of Jeff Bezos as he created the largest Internet company in the world.

In this book you get to read over twenty annual letters by Jeff Bezos, which will get you up to speed on amazon history. Basically you will realize how amazon has evolved over time to the beloved site it is now.

What first struck me was how intellectual the letters were and yet they were very witty and lol funny in places. Jeff's charismatic personality definitely comes across well and this makes the letters very enjoyable to read. They can almost stand alone as a form of art without any explanation needed.

In the letters Jeff spends time explaining his point of view on allowing customers to post negative reviews. He discusses Alexa, Amazon Go, Amazon Books, Frustration-free packaging, marketplace, PRIME, quantitative analysis, skills-forward approaches, machine learning techniques, long-term thinking, FBA (Fulfillment by Amazon), Career Choice and Whole Foods. Every major thing amazon has done is spoken of reverently in these letters. It is however interesting that Jeff Bezos changed his mind about physical stores.

My favorite letter was the 2007 letter that talks about the Kindle. Besides PRIME, the Kindle is what has affected my personal life the most. I've downloaded and read thousands of books over the years. It is great to instantly get a book that you can start reading seconds from downloading. Many times the books I've downloaded have been in some way lifesaving as I've had to research health conditions. Reading on the Kindle has really become my most compelling passion. Kindle Unlimited is one of my favorite things ever as I can literally find books on nearly every topic I could wish to read about!

One thing about this book is the fact that each letter past 1997 has the 1997 letter repeated at the start of the new letter. I simply fast forwarded through it each time as reading it before each letter would have taken a lot of time. I was therefore able to finish the book in two days.

There are some things I wondered about in the past, like did amazon give tours of fulfillment centers? The answer is YES! The URL is given for more information. There is also a comment about Amazon Smile and how you can donate to the charity of your choice each time you shop.

This book is part amazon history lesson, part enthusiastic celebration of success. Every business owner and amazon customer should read this collection of letters to fully understand the “customer-obsessed culture” of amazon. Maybe the new tag line should be: “Delighting customers one PRIME shipment at a time!” For instant gratification has become a reality when shopping at amazon.

As someone who has purchased pillowcases from India, a battery operated candle from Malaysia and curtains made in China I can say amazon's commitment to global shopping is inspirational. You really can find anything your heart could wish for all in one place. In fact when I get a catalog in the mail, I just look up the items at amazon. And after an experience of going to four stores in one day with no luck finding a foot cream, I just came home and ordered it from amazon like I should have in the first place. I learn!

So I found this book inspirational and I feel anyone who loves amazon will be intrigued by these letters. In the words of Copywriter Robert Gibson: “The unknown requires relentless optimism.” Jeff Bezos' optimism and drive to please customers has made amazon my favorite website in the world. And I know millions of people agree that it is the best place to shop online. Jeff Bezos is leading us into the future of the Internet. I'm just wondering what fantastic thing will he think up next? :)

~The Rebecca Review

Reviewing this book is not an endorsement of any movies, shows, books or music mentioned in the book. I don't agree with everything amazon sells (who does?) but I'm grateful they have many Christian books going back centuries that I enjoy reading. I believe at amazon you have to make good choices about what you buy just like in any other store.
The Office: The Untold Story of the Greatest Sitcom of the 2000s: An Oral History
The Office: The Untold Story of the Greatest Sitcom of the 2000s: An Oral History
Ok...admission #1: I have yet to read most of this book. Why I am even bothering? Why am I bothering you? Because sometimes you just know. It's like meeting someone for the first time and after only a moment you just "know". You click. You're soul mates. You're in love. Or at least "in like". Admission #2: I haven't really watched the show. My daughter has been obsessed with it and my daughter is much more clever and intelligent and with-it than I can ever hope to be. If she says something is good then it's certainly worth my time to investigate, dabble and peruse. So, through her I've seen bits and pieces of it over the years. (Am I the only one who's experienced the oddity of never having seen something other than a snippet and then coming across it serendipitously channel surfing or looking over a daughter's shoulder find that you're seeing the exact same scene you saw the one other time you caught the program?). I've chuckled a time or two. Admission #3: I LOVE oral histories ('that's what she said') Seeing this was an oral history and having this program on my bucket list AND this being the second week of my life being on hold along with millions of others because of Covid-19 (I'm sensing a future 'oral history' of these strange days) I've decided to start Mr Greene's book AND begin binge-watching THE OFFICE starting with the original British version. I'll read along as I watch. Admission #4: Although true that I haven't actually read this book before audaciously 'reviewing' it, I have read through chapter 2 and have snuck enough of a peek at the rest to feel confident that my 5-Star rating will hold. Sometimes you just know.
Famous People: Elon Musk Biography
Famous People: Elon Musk Biography
Famous People: Elon Musk Biography by Pandora. Rated undefined out of 5 stars, with null ratings. Read more and check out similar items in the "Elon Musk" category.
Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum
Greenfield Village and the Henry Ford Museum
I was a little disappointed to see the book is all in black and white and no color photos.

The photo shown was rather misleading.

I don't mind but I ordered it for my 9 yr. old Granddaughter and they tend to dis anything not

in color.

A great book even though things have changed quite a bit since it was published.
I Invented the Modern Age: The Rise of Henry Ford
I Invented the Modern Age: The Rise of Henry Ford
This wonderful book pulls Henry Ford into the present by presenting us with his deep revealing shadow. Richard Snow has chosen to create a picture of Ford that starts in his early life and leads ineluctably to the development of the Model T, which Snow describes convincingly as having invented the modern age. This isn't a new idea of course but what this book does is not only evoke a vivid picture of genius at its peak but it provides the essence of what we gained and lost through Ford's bizarre twists of character. We gained, of course, mass production and the automobile as a transformative force. And with Ford doubling the working man's salary, we also gained a middle class. (The book goes on to report on the brutality Ford later used against his workers, but that early support of the worker was an almost heartbreaking reminder of what is now being lost --US manufacturing and the working middle class.) And we probably also lost the possiblity of a global organization right after WWI. The book doesn't shy away from Ford's very weird and destructive anti-Semitism, his ruthless treatment of men who had been indispensible in his rise, nor his damaging and tragic relationship with his son. However, throughout this brilliant book I was periodically reminded of two other men, Steve Jobs and Robert Moses, who were also initially motivated by the desire to change lives for good. All three achieved monstrous changes in the fabric of society by building tangible stuff and overcoming extreme obstacles to do so. In the process, however, all three also underwent crippling psychological changes that made them, somehow, monstrous. To make this point, the important biographers of Jobs and Moses wrote very long books. Snow elegantly and kindly reveals this in far fewer pages. And it reads like a novel. (I hope some smart producer notices that the Selden patent case by itself has enough drama and character to fill a mini-series.) Snow even manages to make machinery thrilling, and this for a reader who doesn't know the difference between a monkey wrench and a monkey. I recommend buying it on the Kindle because at the end you can expand the picture of Henry Ford's face and place your finger on each side of it. You'll know what I mean when you buy this book.
The Toddler in Chief: What Donald Trump Teaches Us about the Modern Presidency
The Toddler in Chief: What Donald Trump Teaches Us about the Modern Presidency
I have not finished reading Drezner's book yet, but the only thing that bothers me is that he doesn't refer to EMPIRE itself at all, although he does characterize and compare Emperor Trump with other child Emperors.

And while the author humorously notes:

The history of modern states being ruled by actual toddlers is scant and scary. The most obvious case is Emperor Pu Yi of China’s Manchu Dynasty. He ascended to the throne in 1908 at the age of two. According to his autobiography, Pu Yi responded to his ascension by throwing a temper tantrum and refusing to go to the Forbidden City for his coronation. In the end, he only agreed to go if his wet nurse carried him. During the ceremony, he threw candy at the Empress Dowager. His father, attempting to placate him, cooed, “It will soon be over.”98 For the courtiers in the Forbidden City, this was a bad omen. As it turned out their foreboding was prescient. Pu Yi acknowledged that while Emperor he was “without any real awareness of the political situation.” He was the last Emperor of China, abdicating from his post at the age of five “with a similar lack of comprehension of the true situation.”99

The last Chinese Emperor actually 'was' a child, and China in 1908 was neither a powerful Empire, nor had the world evolved/devolved to this 21st century form of an actual, though effectively camouflaged, Disguised Global Crony Capitalist Empire, as Prof. Robinson had diagnosed two years before Emperor Trump ascended to the throne:

“The U.S. state is a key point of condensation for pressures from dominant groups around the world to resolve problems of global capitalism and to secure the legitimacy of the system overall. In this regard, “U.S.” imperialism refers to the use by transnational elites of the U.S. state apparatus (hard & soft powers) to continue to attempt to expand, defend, and stabilize the global capitalist system. We are witness less to a “U.S.” imperialism per se than to a global capitalist imperialism.

We face an EMPIRE OF GLOBAL CAPITAL, headquartered, for evident historical reasons, in Washington.” [Caps added]

Global Capitalism and the Crisis of Humanity, 2014 Robinson, William Cambridge University Press
Google It: A History of Google
Google It: A History of Google
From the first page, a fascinating read about the two men who "wanted to organize the internet" for their dissertation projects and ended up "changing the world" when they created Google. I did not realize how much "Google" influences my life and how much more it may do so in the future; and I did not realize how Googlers learned as they went, always in pursuit of helping their users. In the beginning, you could only use Google to search text based info on the web, but then when everyone wanted to see an image of Jennifer Lopez’s dress at the 2000 Grammy Awards, Google figured out how we could search images. When 9-11-2001 happened, everyone wanted to search the web for current news, but Google only updated key words (based on new postings) every 24 hours at that point so when you searched Twin Towers, you weren’t seeing the news necessarily; they figured out how to change that.

Redding chronicles not only how Google (originally "Backrub") took off (Lego Duplo blocks were involved), but what they are doing to move us toward the future (think health, space travel, driverless cars and more). She does this in a conversational tone that YA (plus 5th-8th grade) readers will be drawn to and with a clear writing style that unpacks some difficult concepts.

Two DOWN POINTS to consider (but not deal breakers) -
1) The quality of the photos is not great and some of the text is printed on a dark background with the print that is too pale to read well. I think there were some design decisions - how do we break up the text? how do we make it YA appealing? - that may have gotten in the way.

2) While there are a few points in the book, where Redding explores how some have criticized Google for failing their users in some way and Google has responded by making changes, Redding's perspective for the most part is a sort of 'feel good about Google' and 'Isn't Google amazing?' conversation. YA readers need to be aware of this and consider what the author has left out. A reoccurring note in the book is the internal MOTTO at Google of "DON'T BE EVIL"; as I was reading this news broke about YouTube, a subsidiary of Google, collecting children’s personal information without their parents’ consent and then about Google possibly violating the Sherman Anti-trust Act that outlaws monopolistic business practices. Readers should look for other perspectives or read additional sources to learn more about Google.

On a similar note, the author describes how people who work at Google get 20% of their time to work on projects of their own choice (this is how we got Gmail). There has been some debate in the press in the last few years (but beginning prior to the publication of this book) over whether, in reality, this is true. It’s very hard to make that time for professional inquiry of your own when you have an overwhelming job at Google. Some think the 20% independent inquiry time Google says they give employees is primarily a way the company promotes itself.

I’m not saying that the company Google is bad. I’m just saying that a reader needs to be aware of the author’s apparent perspective and of the perspective the reader begins to develop as they read this book (because of reading this book). Looking for other perspectives should be encouraged. (Personally, as a child of the 80s where you could only find info at the library, I appreciate everything Google has done for my life.)

NOT A DEAL BREAKER. I’d STILL RECOMMEND THIS TO YOUR STUDENTS.
Los innovadores: Los genios que inventaron el futuro [The Innovators: The Geniuses Who Invented the Future]
Los innovadores: Los genios que inventaron el futuro [The Innovators: The Geniuses Who Invented the Future]
Es el tercer libro que leo de Walter Isaacson (los dos anteriores son los que consagró a biografiar a Albert Einstein y Steve Jobs). Como siempre, la prosa fácil y fluida de Isaacson hace que viajes a una velocidad huracanada por sus páginas. Su nuevo libro es un coro de biografías, las de todos aquellos que contribuyeron a hacer más estrecha y fructífera la cooperación entre la inteligencia humana y la potencia de cálculo de las máquinas. Isaacson cree que este enfoque de la simbiosis hombre-máquina es más prometedor que el de la inteligencia artificial, la creación de artefactos que emulen o superen a la mente humana.
También Isaacson homenajea en su libro la inteligencia colectiva: muestra cómo los grandes hitos de esta relación simbiótica entre el hombre y los mecanismos (el transistor, el microprocesador, el ordenador, Internet, etc.) fueron el resultado de ensamblar pedacitos de inteligencia y habilidades individuales que, no obstante ser heterogéneas entre sí, se complementaban y daban lugar a un puzle coherente y de más valor que sus componentes por separado. La única excepción a esta norma fue la invención de la Web por el talento solitario del ingeniero informático Tim Berners-Lee.
Me ha parecido muy interesante en especial la aclaración del papel del Departamento de Defensa de Estados Unidos en la aparición de Internet, una de las tres patas del invento; las otras dos fueron las entidades académicas y la industria privada.
En el último capítulo de su libro, Isaacson propone una idea de lo más sugerente: que la inteligencia colectiva no tiene por qué reducirse a la cooperación entre humanos; puede asimismo integrar las habilidades complementarias de hombres (intuición, habilidades motoras) y máquinas (inmensa capacidad de cálculo). Esta cooperación transfronteriza entre hombres y mecanismos tal vez supere tanto los logros de la inteligencia colectiva humana como los de la inteligencia artificial.
Una última idea que me ha hecho «ruido» de este libro es que los grandes innovadores de la era digital, desde Ada Lovelace hasta Steve Jobs, eran en su mayor parte personas situadas en la intersección de las ciencias y las humanidades.
Satchmo: The Wonderful World and Art of Louis Armstrong
Satchmo: The Wonderful World and Art of Louis Armstrong
Who wouda thunk that Louie was such a wonderful collage artist? I do photo collages myself and these are some of the best I've seen and the added plus is that they not only document his life but those of his musician buddies and collaborators. I actually like these better than most of Romare Beardon's collages, the great black artist of the middle 50 years of the 20th century - Satchmo's contemporary. I wonder if they ever met and if Beardon knew Armstrong was kicking ass in his artform?
Bob Dylan Hard To Handle
Bob Dylan Hard To Handle
When I saw this was from Brazil or whatever country in South America speaks Portuguese, bells went off, alarms sounded and that little voice in the back of my head said "don't buy this, it's a cheap, shoddy rip-off." I had it on VHS and being unable to find an American release of the tour on DVD, decided to take a chance. I was glad I did. Quality-wise, its as good as the VHS tape and shows Dylan and Petty with the Heartbreakers as a superb back-up band in the days before the Traveling Wilburys had been dreamed of. Was this tour perhaps the genesis of that legendary super-group? Makes no difference, if you're a Dylan fan, this belongs in your collection. If you're a Petty fan, it belongs in your collection. Highlights include: Like A Rolling Stone, Knockin' on Heaven's Door, Just Like A Woman (one of Dylan's forgotten mid-'60's masterpieces) and others. If you only buy one Dylan DVD, this should be the one. Don't let the Portuguese scare you....it's not subtitled.
LVYUAN 150W Power Inverter for Car, Inverter 12V to 110V AC Car Inverter Converter with 3.1A Dual USB Car Adapter for Car Cigarette Lighter
LVYUAN 150W Power Inverter for Car, Inverter 12V to 110V AC Car Inverter Converter with 3.1A Dual USB Car Adapter for Car Cigarette Lighter
Out if the box, the power inverter seemed to only intermittently work. After checking that my SUV had no electrical problems I tried checking the plug. It was a loose fit. So, I bent out the pieces of metal that provide rigidity to the connection. I also noticed that the tip of the plug was shallow. I unscrewed the conical housing and stretched out the spring to provide a solid connection. I double checked the solder on the wiring to see if there were any apparent defects. Seeing none, I tried it out with charging my netbook and phones. Success! Thus far it has worked like a champ.
Xiaomi Redmi Note 9 4GB RAM + 128GB, 48MP Quad Camera Hotshot, 5020mah Battery, 6.53 ”FHD +, LTE Factory Unlocked Smartphone - International Version (Forest Green)
Xiaomi Redmi Note 9 4GB RAM + 128GB, 48MP Quad Camera Hotshot, 5020mah Battery, 6.53 ”FHD +, LTE Factory Unlocked Smartphone - International Version (Forest Green)
Update: found a work around for the lag in full screen games, thanks XDA developers.
-Enable Developer options (click 5x on the OS build #)
-Then Goto "Settings" > "Additional settings" > "Developer options" > activate "Disable HW overlays" (by default the games get a black bar to hide the camera punch out, that takes a ton of extra GPU power. disable the hw overlay disables that "feature" freeing up the much needed resources on this slug of a SOC. Enjoy!

Trash for games and embedded videos. Lag monster. Better than nothing. Very under powered but getting the job done while my phone gets repaired. The battery life is amazing. It does the basics very well. Very iphone like UI (after updating) Actually takes decent pictures on the rear camera. Great wifi and cellular LTE connection but not enough "power" to utilize it (i.e. slow download speed reguarless of the capabilities of the network AT&T & Google Fiber 1000mbps up/down). If you do any gaming I would not recommend it, if not I would recommend it for the battery life.
+25
+25
Are you in the market for a black steampunk shirt of an owl? You are? Well then, this is the right review for you. I too once was in the very same place as you with one difference -- I bought the shirt. Now hear my story.

It's not always the case that what you buy looks as good in person or better, but that IS the case here. No matter how cool this shirt looks on your screen, it will look exactly 1.5 times as cool in person, even after multiple washes. The image doesn't fade or flake. No annoying tag. This is nice (silk-screened stuff I am assuming) ladies and gentlemen.

If you usually wear a large, then get this in large. I did. It fits comfortably, with no tightness in areas where tightness shouldn't be. Neither is it roomy enough for you and a friend. One shirt -- one person. It's owleriffic bliss.

The price is a bit higher than your usual t-shirts, but it is worth it. Remember, I was once where you stand, considering the cost of the shirt and the security of your money in whatever place you store your money.

It's a steampunk clockwork owl on a black shirt that fits, feels good, looks good, and and keeps looking good. It's made of quality material, and it's worth the price. What else can I say? Oh yeah. In the spirit of the age, 'tis owleriffic!
Funko Pop Marvel: Venom - Venom Captain America Collectible Figure, Multicolor
Funko Pop Marvel: Venom - Venom Captain America Collectible Figure, Multicolor
I got four of these venom-superhero hybrid FunkoPops.
Why are you thinking of buying this and is this FunkoPop worth it?
1) You buy because you are a FunkoPop collector: this is definitely worth getting. The head bobbles (it's on a spring), therefore is not like the conventional type FunkoPops. It's really nice and looks really pretty.
2) You are a marvel fan/collector: this is definitely a really nice collective piece. I would get all these marvel memorabilia now that they're hot and, relatively, cheap. Captain America as Venom? You don't see that - it's original and kooky and is perfect for any Cap fan.

It's really well made, even though I am a little concerned of how the bobbly head will hold up in the future.
Delivery - super fast and very well packaged.

Would totally reccommend
Red Dawn (1984)
Red Dawn (1984)
I first saw this as s kid and taped it. Hadn’t seen this for about 25 years. I saw it on Amazon for a great price and remembered liking it, having it taped. I put it in and my reaction to it as an adult was chilling as it never had been. It felt like a story more possible now than ever. I was more emotionally invested and it seemed like a foretelling, a prediction. I’m VERY glad to have purchased this for my collection. I hope I’m wrong and that NOTHING like this will ever come to pass. Maybe with maturity, cynicism and more knowledge of world politics and the very real dangers in the world beginning with 9/11 to the present it now seems more prescient. A very believable and terrifying film. Seeing the late actors Patrick Swayze, Powers Boothe, and Harry Dean Stanton also gave it an air of melancholy as well. Also, remembering that this was Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey’s first film together was interesting. This was the first film released rated PG-13. Also, like Keanu Reeves I have never been a Patrick Swayze fan, for his acting OR looks. I just didn’t understand the attraction. Swayze’s final scene in this film is annoyingly bad. It almost ruins the movie for me. He and Keanu were always bad actors, who, because women thought they were so hot, kept getting roles better suited for almost anybody else. Picture and sound on this blu ray release are great and 1/4 of the price of Shout Factory’s release which only added a 15 minute retrospective with no one in the film and reversible cover with the great original poster art (which is the only reason I almost bought their version instead of this one). But, alas, the price difference was too great to justify buying the Shout release. This release is more than sufficient.
Thor Epic Collection: The Black Galaxy (The Mighty Thor Epic Collection)
Thor Epic Collection: The Black Galaxy (The Mighty Thor Epic Collection)
It's a truth universally acknowledged that any long-running superhero will go through a number of changes intended, usually temporarily, to shake up the status quo and prevent complacency setting in. This latest Thor Epic (volumes 18, covering 1990-1991) is just another example. If you picked up the chronologically preceding volume, In Mortal Flesh, you will know that in this period, Thor was merged with the mortal architect Eric Masterson.

It's a return of sorts to the very earliest days, when Thor had to take the place of frail doctor Donald Blake whenever he sprung into action, although this time the two characters are literally separate people, rather than two identities of the same one. Eric, too, comes with his own supporting cast and personal plots, trying to balance a custody battle for his son and his career with the need for the god of thunder to protect both Midgard and Asgard. It definitely adds a great deal of freshness to the book, with the new cast additions clashing interestingly with the existing heroes and villains.

Tom DeFalco and Ron Frenz, who produce the vast majority of the issues here, are one of my favourite creative pairings, balancing emotional human-level concerns and vast cosmic calamities without it ever seeming jarring. There's a whole lot packed into this volume - the return of Surtur and Ymir; an amazing arc involving the High Evolutionary, some new gods, and the Celestials; the brutality of the Wrecking Crew; and a battle with Loki that has dramatic repercussions.

Extras include a Marvel Fanfare pinup, three pages from the Marvel Swimsuit issue, the cover art for the original Black Galaxy Saga trade, and three pages of original art by Frenz. It's a great run of Thor, both new and comfortingly familiar in turns, and a highly recommended Asgardian addition to your book shelf.
Face the Fire: Three Sisters Island Trilogy, Book 3
Face the Fire: Three Sisters Island Trilogy, Book 3
Face the Fire is the third book in the whimsical, spellbinding Three Sisters Island trilogy by Nora Roberts set on a picturesque island in Massachusetts. Having this series set in New England only adds to the magic and coziness of each story and each season - small, charming seaside town, with its sandy beaches, blue surf, sail boats and fishing docks, bookstore/cafe, cottages and characters that are near and dear to each and of course, sizzling romance, and witch's magic - though not the hokey kind of magic but modern day witches - think "Practical Magic" (if you’ve ever seen the Sandra Bullock/Nicole Kidman classic movie or read the book). Three Sisters Island is a cozy place to live and work! In this book we follow Mia's story, the most powerful sister preparing to face the third and final test that the three witches, Nell, Ripley, and Mia - must face in order to save the island and themselves from perishing into the roaring sea. However, Mia never counted on Sam Logan being a part of the final battle. He who is Earth and who is Mia's first and only true love has come back to Three Sisters to win back the heart of Mia and to share his magic in order to help save the island during the final battle with darkness that licks and threatens his girl and his island. Mia is perturbed at his sudden appearance, after breaking her heart and leaving the island years before, but she who is Fire is destined to open her heart and free herself and those she loves or lose her own life. Which path will she choose? With the help of her sisters and her carefully refined Craft and gift, Mia must gather the power within her and be brave enough to face the fire, to take a chance. This book will make you want to hang dried herbs in your kitchen, plant lavender in your garden, and drape crystals from your rear view mirror! Enjoy this mystical tale with a hot cup of coffee, happy reading!
Dance Upon the Air (Three Sisters Island Book 1)
Dance Upon the Air (Three Sisters Island Book 1)
This book is one of my most favorite Nora Roberts' books.
I have the physical book copy of this novel and years and years of reading and re-reading have curled the pages, cracked the spine, warped the cover and yet the story still sucks me in every time.
I am in process of replacing the majority of my physical books with e-books (I sure wish they'd give us credit or something so you don't have to buy the same book twice at full price, grrr)
Anyways one of the first books to be replaced with an e version is this one, Dance Upon the Air.
As part of a trilogy it is a beautiful first part...but in truth more often than not I read it as a stand alone.
It's not that the plot is so complicated or intense or anything...it's just that what Nora does best, she does in this book. She writes a world that you can drink in lie water. A few pages in you see the world, not the words.
I can't tell you how many times I stepped off the ferry and wandered the high street with the main character.
There have been times I'd leave this book (the physical copy) in a convenient place and just pop it open and read and re-read my favorite scenes.
The description of the cafe and all the baked goods and the kitchen....just perfect. There's something about the way Nora writes, when she's "on" she is soooo on. The world is larger and richer than the few words on the page.
Considering how she likes to weave a little magic in to a lot of her books, this one included, perhaps these novels where she's "on" are her own form of magic, the few simple words together on the page creating something together much grander than it really ought to be...
Anyways, this book is my go to feel good story.
The drama is light, not too intense.
I don't mind intense but when life gets hectic or crazy or down right crappy it's nice to pick up a story that you can slide in to on any page and visit that world.
I am from the East Coast myself originally so perhaps the descriptions of the little village on an island, the trees and water and rocks and salty air just strike a particular chord with me.

I've said before, Nora could write an entire book or books on the day to day mundane goings on in the little cafe book shop and I'd read it.
Sometimes the things she writes about, the most simple are the most effective...

As I said it's part of a trilogy so you sort of have to read all 3 to feel complete.
But this is my favorite of the 3. I'll attach photos of the physical copy so you can see how well loved it is.

Not all of Nora's books are hits for me...in recent years some of them are almost misses. I remarked in another review that I wasn't sure if it was her or me who has changed.
Thus far this story hasn't changed for me, it's familiar and comforting like your favorite blanket :)

I didn't and won't go into plot details, if you like small island life, books and cafe offerings. A bit of mystery a lot of magic and a sweet touch of romance (actual romance!) then you'll like this.

I am thrilled to have the e-book version finally. There is something supremely comforting at knowing I have a ton of Nora stories in one little device that I can carry every where. :)

Oh and one other thought while it's on my mind. I know firt hand how slightly painful it can be to part with physical books. But nostalgia and cost of e-books etc aside, I can say from experience that the physical book is not what you love. It's the story. And a good story, like this one, sucks you in. You'll forget within moments WHAT you're reading on, or even what you're reading. A good story is alive and not bound to paper.
I started reading my new ebook version of Dance Upon the Air and on my tablet and was succcccked right in, as always. :)
Louis L'Amour: An Annotated Bibliography and Guide
Louis L'Amour: An Annotated Bibliography and Guide
Reviews of novels are not quoted; only cited. Volumes are not cataloged in alphabetical order, for easy reference. You have to consult the index first--then use the number to hunt the page where your item of interest is to be found.
Astro Boy Omnibus Volume 7
Astro Boy Omnibus Volume 7
When last we left Astro Boy he was lost in the Mekong River in 1979 drained of all power. As volume 7 opens it’s 24 years later and Astro is being dredged up from the water. He is sent to Shingo Yamahaka whom Astro had met in the previous book back when Shingo was a begger boy. Shingo is now the president of a large corporation and with his wealth he’s able to give Astro enough power to activate him again but power is a lot costlier in 1993 than in Astro Boy’s time and even with Shingo’s considerable wealth he can’t afford to maintain Astro’s power. Astro meets Shingo’ daughter Surume who is quite taken with Astro and by taken I do literally mean romantically and yes she does realize he is a robot. He ends up getting involved in helping a robot falsely accused of robbing a bank but by the end of the story he has again run out of power. The story then flashes forward in time to when Dr. Tenma’s son Tobio was still alive and the story essentially moves into an extended origin story.

Volume 7 spans December 1967 to September 1968 and it’s perhaps the most shocking volume I’ve yet to read. It’s no secret that Osamu Tezuka was greatly influenced by Disney and you can see it in his artwork. As a westerner, experience has taught me to have certain expectations as far as storylines go when I see Disney like artwork so in can be a jolt when Tezuka does something dramatically un-Disney like. For instance, if the story introduces a sympathetic character, even if it is just a sentient robot, you would expect that in his moment of greatest victory he would be torn to pieces by an angry mob. Also wouldn’t expect in the retelling of Astro Boy’s origin to see a horrifying image of Tobio’s flattened car. Perhaps the most shocking event in the book is the eventual fate of the future Astro Boy. I was wondering how Tezuka would handle having two Astro Boys’ in the same time period but I was not expecting what happened.

This volume is more than shocking; it’s kind of a downer. Throughout the series Tezuka stresses the idea of robots rights but there is no joy for the Robot’s in this volume. If you’re a fan of happy endings this may not be the book for you. One of the saddest parts is the relationship between Astro and Tobio’s mother who comes to love Astro as her own son but as anyone who knows the origin of Astro knows he’s eventually rejected by his creator, Dr. Tenma. Tenma isn’t so much a villain as he is just a deeply flawed man.

Despite the whimsical art style this really isn’t a book I could recommend for young children. Astro starts the book being pulled from the Mekong River and he ends in an even worse position if that seems possible. As if Astro’s life couldn’t be any worse after being rejected by his creator and sold to a sadistic robot circus owner an even greater tragedy strikes. Imagine the movie Dumbo if Dumbo’s life were 10 times worse and these are only the tragedies heaped on Astro Boy. There are no happy endings for anyone. Lord, I hope things improve for Astro Boy in volume 8 because this is getting painful to read. Despite the pathos this to me was one of stronger volumes and it sure was one of the most emotional.
The Intimate Sex Lives of Famous People
The Intimate Sex Lives of Famous People
This book is chock-full of strange and interesting tidbits about all kinds of unexpected people throughout history. It naturally focuses on different aspects of their love affairs and love lives, but with the impressive goal of trying to tie these anecdotes and accounts into the overall body of knowledge we have about these people. As the book states, intimacy is an important part of life, and so if you want to really know about how a person was, what was important to them, and how they dealt with things, their approach towards love shouldn't be neglected wholesale in a thorough discussion of their lives. That said, who knows how much of this information is apocryphal, as can happen all too easily with biographical accounts. I would view this book as a good way to get a feel for what was said and thought about famous figures throughout history, during their lifetimes.
NRSV, The C. S. Lewis Bible, Hardcover: For Reading, Reflection, and Inspiration
NRSV, The C. S. Lewis Bible, Hardcover: For Reading, Reflection, and Inspiration
I'll list the good and the bad, starting with the bad.

The bad:
The only thing I do not like is the color scheme and design on the cover. I bought the hardback version (mainly because I've never owned a hardback Bible) and was hoping that once I removed the dust cover there would be a blank book underneath. No such luck. There was the same horrible colors and design underneath on the book itself. Of course, someone might like it, but I'm very put off by it. I now wish I'd have gone with the leather-bound version.

Now for the good:
Inside the book it gets better--way better. The font style, design, and layout of this Bible are the best I've ever seen. Why they did not keep it that classy on the outside I'll never know. The book titles are stylishly written, not quite Celtic or Medieval, but just very tasteful with an old-world look and appeal; and there is ornamentation in various places on the pages. I'm not sure what to call it but I like it.

The pages have plenty of blank space left on either side, as well as above and below the text. Many Bibles have the pages crammed and crowded, but this one seems to let the text breathe; it just makes it more appealing and readable to my eye. And the pages are so beautiful that for the first time in my life I hesitate to mark it up and make my own notes.

Then there is Lewis sprinkled here and there. Never too much, but just about as many "notes" as I wanted and hoped to see. The publishers kept it to where you could reference Lewis if you wanted, or just choose to leave him out entirely for a given session in the Bible.

There's a preface written by Douglas Gresham, and there is an informative Introduction and detailed notes to the reader by other Lewis scholars--all of which I found interesting and helpful.

I've never owned an NRSV Bible before, but I'm enjoying the flow and feel of the translation.

This is not C.S. Lewis "teaching you the Bible." If you're looking for a "Study Bible" where the scripture will be explained and broken down for you, this is not the route to take. But if you're interested in some of the thoughts of C.S. Lewis to go with your Bible reading, this is perfect. And if you're looking for something of quality, that is aesthetically pleasing, you'd be hard-pressed to find anything better, in my opinion.

I will be spending a lot of time with my copy.
メタコレ マーベル アイアン・スパイダー (ウェブ・シューター Ver.)
メタコレ マーベル アイアン・スパイダー (ウェブ・シューター Ver.)
おおまかには2016年2月発売のメタコレ・スパイダーマンの通常スパイダー・スーツがアイアンスパイダー・バージョンになってクモ糸の形違い。または2018年3月発売の手がグーのメタコレ・アイアンスパイダーに2017年7月発売のメタコレ・スパイダーマン(ホームカミング・バージョン)のウェブ発射状態の手にしたものにクモ糸を付けたものと見受けられます。この付属のウェブ(クモ糸)の末端に.動きがあり棒立ちのスパイダーマンなりの工夫が感じられる。歴代を並べると変化が楽しめます。
The Dandelion Conspiracy (Like Michael Crichton's Andromeda Strain or Robin Cook's Outbreak)
The Dandelion Conspiracy (Like Michael Crichton's Andromeda Strain or Robin Cook's Outbreak)
This book had its exciting moments with some clever twists and turns, but much of it lacked character or plot development. Parts of it were superficial enough that I thought I might have purchased a children's book, but then in other places, the plot would thicken and the author(s) built suspense and hit me with a surprise or two. The book was co-written by two authors. Perhaps one did a better job than the other? Andromeda Strain or Outbreak are not proper comparisons as was improperly mentioned in the Amazon description.

The main character, Sid Bruenell, is a team leader with the International Terrorism Taskforce (ITT). He is trying to capture or extradite an international bio-weapons inventor and trafficker named Henry Anzler. He can only trust his sidekick and friend since college, Arty. Everyone else, including his nemesis, Anzler, are not always who they seem to be. Sid has the uncanny ability to solve puzzles and notice facts and patterns that others miss. He has to figure out who's good and who's bad while saving varying parts of Illinois and staying alive. This one is both a detective novel and science fiction. I was able to finish it, but it wasn't like a Robin Cook or Michael Crichton (or even Michael Palmer) novel that I didn't want to put down.
Bleach, Vol. 4
Bleach, Vol. 4
This fourth volume of the excellent Bleach series is slightly more comedic than the previous volumes. The volume begins with a day in the life of Kon which sees him run away but find that the world isn't quite as friendly as he had hoped. After this the main plot of this volume starts up with a popular spiritualist show coming to town that threatens to upset the local ghost population.

As I have already stated this is something of a light hearted volume with the Kon story being quite funny and Don Kanonji's spiritualist show that is not only funny but also thoughtful. As well as this, this volume also includes some good action sequences and some more information on the nature of spirits and how they become Hollows. The volume also finishes on something of a cliff-hanger and I cannot wait to read the series further.
Wish You Well
Wish You Well
This movie is based on an early Baldacci novel, and fans of his more recent works will find this a different sort of story. It's set in the Appalachian Mountains of Virginia in a time when mining was a major industry in need of more land containing coal. This sets up a conflict between a strong-willed, scrupulously honest grandmother who has recently lost her son, who had left for the area for city life, and now has responsibility for her two grandchildren and her daughter-in-law, who has been injured in her husband's fatal car crash. The grandmother makes her living from farming the land and feels it is her duty to preserve it, She does her best to pass on her feelings and knowledge to her grandchildren. The coal company wants the mineral rights to her land and has been pressuring her to sell at a time when she is just barely making ends meet. She has a local attorney who is her friend and who is on her side. The story masterfully develops relationships between grandmother and grandchildren, grandchildren and other young people of the area, and people who want to ensure the land stays in the family and those who would do almost anything to put the land into the hands of the coal company. The suspense is well built and leads to a bittersweet conclusion. It is in the building to this conclusion that the movie shines. The acting is believable, and the viewer is left nodding in agreement that the ending is as it should be. It's a bonus that the movie was filmed in Giles County, Virginia, a place of awe-inspiring beauty.
Princess Daisy: A Novel
Princess Daisy: A Novel
I read this as a young Girl back in the 80's and fell in love with Judith Krantz's novels. All of these years later I decided I needed some major glam fantasy to escape to during our crazy coronavirus days and decided to revisit Judith Krantz and Jackie Collins. I still love this book and it has held up half a lifetime later. Daisy is still a magnificent heroine and Miss Krantz's writing still commands my attention until the last page. Go ahead and indulge this guilty pleasure, you won't regret it!
Target Practice
Target Practice
Target Practice is a collection of early Rex Stout short stories which were originally published in the 1910's and 20's in the now long defunct "All-Stories Magazine." Some were published under the pseudonym "Evan Day." Stout had mostly disavowed his early work and didn't have copies of them in his personal papers after he died.

A Stout fan came to the rescue a number of years later while researching Stout's early work. Apparently, he had to go to extraordinary lengths to find them. The only copies left in existence were in the United States Library of Congress. Not only did the library refuse to let the editor look at the magazines because of their fragile state, but they had no intention of preserving them either. Foolish really.

It took intervention by a member of Congress to get permission to have the magazines copied. A transcription later and the stories along with a few novels ("
LEGO, Star Wars, Kylo Ren's Command Shuttle (30279) Bagged
LEGO, Star Wars, Kylo Ren's Command Shuttle (30279) Bagged
I ordered some Legos for my nephew for Christmas and I know that Legos have a tendency to be expensive but I was very disappointed with the small plastic bag of Legos that arrived. These are the small bags that you would not want to pay more than $5 for. I gave 2 stars instead of 1 because the shipping was quick, but overall I am just very disappointed at the quality vs. cost but didn't have time to get my nephew a replacement gift.
Schlunder Choco-cake (14 ounce)
Schlunder Choco-cake (14 ounce)
While I got the product on time as promised and the texture of the product before trying to consume it was as soft as a pillow, the cake itself was as dry as a cracker. I bought three cakes with the intention of giving two away. The second one I tried to "microwave" a little bit to make the texture a little bit better for eating. This did not help at all. I did not even try to eat with the third cake and threw it out. My maternal grandfather (my "opa") told me that you always would want to have a "Schlünder" product. Things must have changed.
NFL: A Football Life: Ray Lewis
NFL: A Football Life: Ray Lewis
I purchased this for my 10 year old son. He absolutely admires Ray Lewis. Very encouraging story! Was delivered on time and in great condition.
Magic and Paganism in Early Christianity: The World of the Acts of the Apostles
Magic and Paganism in Early Christianity: The World of the Acts of the Apostles
This volume, smallish but rigorous enough, may for some students be an insightful supplement to the study of Luke's Acts. However, it is interesting in its own merits, as history/ scholarship and as exegesis.
From Klauck's introduction: "[W]e now have the possibility of standing afresh in a situation that was a matter of everyday living for the first Christian generations. At the beginning, the Christian faith had to assert itself among the rival religious views which literally competed with one another on the market-place for the favour of the public."

"Like Philo and Josephus, Luke begins by presenting his material in a form which met the expectations of an educated Greek and Roman public." (p4) Luke, we recall, was a gentile and a scientist (a physician) -- the sciences of the Greco-Roman world being astronomy, mathematics and medicine. It is not surprising that Luke's interests engage the 'marketplace of ideas' in which Christianity grew in spite of resistance on all sides. While his approbation of the apostles is evident, his Acts of the Apostles is essentially documentation, it is not polemic. "The primary intention of the Acts of the Apostles as a book is not missionary, but it does portray missionary history, as an inspiration to the reader." (p121)

Klauck's many interesting considerations include Paul's discourse with the Epicurean and Stoic philosophers in Athens, at the Areopagus, and encounters with practitioners of magic. In the author's summary words: "Acts employs dramatic episodes, verbal discourses, summary descriptions of the state of affairs, and narrative commentaries. . . the result is a broad and vivid picture. In the course of the narrative, we gradually encounter a whole series of . . . magicians, astrologers and exorcists . . . a king who does not distance himself sufficiently from the cult of rulers . . . a seer . . . devotees of polytheistic belief . . . philosophers whose curiosity is more noticeable than their academic training . . . kindly barbarians and some genuinely 'noble' pagans.
"Despite all the criticism of some defective forms, we do not find any heavily aggressive polemic. Instead, there is a subtle irony which occasionally takes the form of brilliant parodies." (p119)

The bibliography lists a wealth of resources essentially for the multi-lingual reader (German, English, French).
Funko Pop Rocks: Music - Mariah Carey Christmas Collectible Figure, Multicolor
Funko Pop Rocks: Music - Mariah Carey Christmas Collectible Figure, Multicolor
Funko has an amazing ability to capture someone's likeness, real or fiction, despite the limits of their very unique stylization. Sometimes they miss the mark, but from her trademark curls cascading over the right side of her face (Her left side is her good side) to her beauty mark they've captured her perfectly!
As a long time fan, merchandise like this is hard to come by.. so to finally have her immortalized in vinyl is something I've been waiting for since I can remember!
The Queen of Christmas reigns!
Eastland Women's Bandana Fashion Boot
Eastland Women's Bandana Fashion Boot
Very soft inside with a nice cushy sole, pretty brown color and no imperfections on the exterior. However I'll be returning because the heel is a bit higher than I expected and I think it would get uncomfortable after walking around in it a long time and they're a bit fancier looking in person than what I was gonna use them for lol. Other than that extremely nice boots
Atlantis (Geschenk Edition)
Atlantis (Geschenk Edition)
why the two star from another?? Warum (why?) This album is going platinum in Deutschland. So many people can't be wrong. 25 new titles. Sounds fresh and Andrea Berg is reaching new height. I have several other albums/CD of hers and I think this is the best by far. Abenteuer 20 Jahre Andrea Berg is really good CD/DVD; but this, I think is better.

If you want to listen to sample go to amazon dot de and there, you can play the samples. I think first two tracks Atlantis lebt and Das Gefuhl have been uploaded on youtube.
Vivo Y69 (Gold)
Vivo Y69 (Gold)
Excellent phone.All new features with updated versions. Inbuilt antivirus app (I manager).Camera is soo nice,Sound quality superb, Automatic brightness and more are perfect. Request vivo to improvisations of battery life. Vivo Y69 really rockzzz.

Recent posts by Skylar Davis
Message Skylar Davis